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View Full Version : BBC: Why do some Americanisms irritate people?



jr1
2011-07-14, 00:48
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/14130942

Article about the entry of American terms into British English. It doesn't bother me much but it really irks some people, for example every email I send to my father is sent back with stern reminders about not using Americanisms when writing to him.

I think its gone too far when British people start saying 'gas station' instead of petrol station and 'candy' instead of chocolate, but other than that who cares?

Curiouscat
2011-07-14, 00:54
Agreed.

Candy is definitely an issue though. They are called sweets and chocolates LOL

Sometimes Brits are too moany !! Victor Meldrew probably inspired that article.

Unome
2011-07-14, 04:18
Muahahahaaa… our Amerikanized Engrish is contaminating your precious British dialect.

jr1
2011-07-14, 04:23
Muahahahaaa… our Amerikanized Engrish is contaminating your precious British dialect.

It is and the problem I have is that I don't know which phrases are Americanisms in a lot of cases. I received a severe reprimand from my father for saying 'back in' somewhere, I didn't even know I was using an Americanism! At the more elite British educational institutions you really lose points for using neo-English (Americanisms, colloquialisms, slang of any kind), because these things are considered informal and inappropriate for academic writing, but I don't even know what constitutes 'proper English'.

Well, we might as well accept American language in its entirety now, we are too far gone.

Unome
2011-07-14, 04:31
I honestly don't know the difference between US and British dialect… :unsure:

Maybe if I can afford a vacation someday then I can tour Britain. :thumbsup:

Haha: "Back in."

jr1
2011-07-14, 04:37
I honestly don't know the difference between US and British dialect… :unsure:

Maybe if I can afford a vacation someday then I can tour Britain. :thumbsup:

Haha: "Back in."

Yeah you'll find the accents are many and varied, and probably very humorous to your ear.

Its easier to tell the difference between British & American English with spelling, so colour v color or centre v center, than it is to discern whether a phrase is English or American.

Curiouscat
2011-07-14, 04:48
and my bloody computer that keeps correcting British spellings to American spellings doesn't help...

Dave
2011-07-14, 05:09
I wish I knew people who spoke with posh and proper accents so that I could sound educated, but most of my friends not only speak poorly, they speak using terms they heard on youtube.

Curiouscat
2011-07-14, 05:13
I like saying "Whatever" with a fake American accent of sorts...

jr1
2011-07-14, 05:17
I like saying "Whatever" with a fake American accent of sorts...

What like Valspeak? What[slight pause] ever.

Dave
2011-07-14, 05:20
I do the opposite I use lots of British expressions and pronunciations.

Curiouscat
2011-07-14, 05:23
What like Valspeak? What[slight pause] ever.

Thats correct!

Although sometimes it becomes the British harsh version"Woteva" haha depending on my mood :)

I'm one of those people that has no control over my accent, so whoever I am with, I end up talking like them!

When I came back from Turkey after 5 years, my Sister said "oh ello, who dropped you off the boat" LOL
:lol::lol::lol:

---------- Post added 2011-07-14 at 05:23 ----------


I do the opposite I use lots of British expressions and pronunciations.
What are your fave ones?

jr1
2011-07-14, 05:24
I do the opposite I use lots of British expressions and pronunciations.

I find accents to be the same as body posture, clothing or any other attribute, it is just a variable component of your phenotype. I have a very normal West Midlands accent when I'm in my home town and the company of my friends, when I have to impress somebody I turn on received pronunciation (aka BBC English aka The Queen's English).

Me and a friend had two girls we met convinced we were Norfolk landowners and attended public (in the British sense of the word, as in elite private schools) using accents. It was lulzy.

---------- Post added 2011-07-14 at 05:27 ----------


Thats correct!

Although sometimes it becomes the British harsh version"Woteva" haha depending on my mood :)

I'm one of those people that has no control over my accent, so whoever I am with, I end up talking like them!

When I came back from Turkey after 5 years, my Sister said "oh ello, who dropped you off the boat" LOL
:lol::lol::lol:[COLOR="Silver"]



My mom does that and it embarrases me so much. We'll be ordering food in a Greek restaurant or a Spanish one and she'll basically imitate the waiter's accent, I'll say, "Mom they'll either think you're stupid or you're taking the mick" but she apparently has no control over it. Usually they are just bemused by it, they probably think, "Well I must have a perfect English accent because I sound exactly like that English lady" :lol:

I used Woteva (said in a drawn out Essexy, Ali G kind of way, and 'Wassup' off the old Budweiser advert (when I was about 10 I used it so much that it became a banned word and any use of it resulted in withdrawal of PS2!).

Dave
2011-07-14, 05:28
I like to say sheduel as opposed to the american skeduel, aluminium as opposed to american aluminum
Militry as opposed to american Militaery
Obamar as opposed to Obama, Americar, I'll say dodgering but only to an english bird :P

bloke is one of my favorites :P

Curiouscat
2011-07-14, 05:32
I find accents to be the same as body posture, clothing or any other attribute, it is just a variable component of your phenotype. I have a very normal West Midlands accent when I'm in my home town and the company of my friends, when I have to impress somebody I turn on received pronunciation (aka BBC English aka The Queen's English).

Me and a friend had two girls we met convinced we were Norfolk landowners and attended public (in the British sense of the word, as in elite private schools) using accents. It was lulzy.

---------- Post added 2011-07-14 at 05:27 ----------



My mom does that and it embarrases me so much. We'll be ordering food in a Greek restaurant or a Spanish one and she'll basically imitate the waiter's accent, I'll say, "Mom they'll either think you're stupid or you're taking the mick" but she apparently has no control over it. Usually they are just bemused by it, they probably think, "Well I must have a perfect English accent because I sound exactly like that English lady" :lol:

I used Woteva (said in a drawn out Essexy, Ali G kind of way, and 'Wassup' off the old Budweiser advert (when I was about 10 I used it so much that it became a banned word and any use of it resulted in withdrawal of PS2!).

:lol::lol:

It really is out of my control, I don't do it on the spot, but after a bit of time with them.
I actually enjoy doing different accents and have been able to phone prank quite a few people with my fake African, Jamiacan, and Indian accents. Of course I am best at doing the Torkish accent :)
Not bad at Russian either.

When I worked with Aussies, Kiwis and South Africans I got the craziest accent going, you would not believe it !! People actually thought I was Australian.

jr1
2011-07-14, 05:33
I like to say sheduel as opposed to the american skeduel, aluminium as opposed to american aluminum
Militry as opposed to american Militaery
Obamar as opposed to Obama, Americar, I'll say dodgering but only to an english bird :P

bloke is one of my favorites :P

Yes, the pronunciation of schedule is a bone of contention for me, I like SHEDULE not SKEDULE, the latter is so lazy. It's like spelling doughnut donut.

Aluminum just makes me laugh, since it is spelt (or spelled?) ALUMIN-I-UM.

I pronounce Obama as Obama, rather than Abama the way some English people do, or O-Bama the way other English people do. In truth I don't think the English way or the American way of pronouncing Obama will be the correct way since it is a Kenyan name.

Curiouscat
2011-07-14, 05:34
This is an excellent representation of how Americans see the British accent... it always makes me LOL

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DBXUXqf8FXk

please listen to it... its great

jr1
2011-07-14, 05:36
:lol::lol:

It really is out of my control, I don't do it on the spot, but after a bit of time with them.
I actually enjoy doing different accents and have been able to phone prank quite a few people with my fake African, Jamiacan, and Indian accents. Of course I am best at doing the Torkish accent :)
Not bad at Russian either.



Russian is funny. Me and my friend had some hilarious moments by ringing people up and saying in very Russian, very fast tones without even saying hello, "Boris the shipment will come through Estonia, if you have problem speak to Vlad". We'd get, "'Ello? Ello? Who is this?" Then they'd hang up most of the time.

Or Indian, hahaha.




When I worked with Aussies, Kiwis and South Africans I got the craziest accent going, you would not believe it !! People actually thought I was Australian.

I can do a pretty good Boer accent, I've thought about trying it out on some real Boers the next time I'm around them (i.e. in London lol), I'll probably get a smack in the mouth if they realise I'm not die real deal. I wouldn't try Aussie or NZ lol.

Curiouscat
2011-07-14, 05:40
Russian is funny. Me and my friend had some hilarious moments by ringing people up and saying in very Russian, very fast tones without even saying hello, "Boris the shipment will come through Estonia, if you have problem speak to Vlad". We'd get, "'Ello? Ello? Who is this?" Then they'd hang up most of the time.

Or Indian, hahaha.



I can do a pretty good Boer accent, I've thought about trying it out on some real Boers the next time I'm around them (i.e. in London lol), I'll probably get a smack in the mouth if they realise I'm not die real deal. I wouldn't try Aussie or NZ lol.

I usually surprise my friends, like if we are out shopping, we walk into a shop and my friend asks for assistance from someone, suddenly I am speaking in a Russian accent!! and my friend is trying not to laugh.
Or I'll do my best ever freshy Turk accent... and my friends are usually on the floor at the end of it.

One of my best mates is an Aussie... the Melbourne accent is great! It always depends on how much time I spend with the person though.

jr1
2011-07-14, 05:43
I usually surprise my friends, like if we are out shopping, we walk into a shop and my friend asks for assistance from someone, suddenly I am speaking in a Russian accent!! and my friend is trying not to laugh.
Or I'll do my best ever freshy Turk accent... and my friends are usually on the floor at the end of it.

One of my best mates is an Aussie... the Melbourne accent is great! It always depends on how much time I spend with the person though.

LOL that woman is a joke of a dialogue coach.

My worst offence is putting on a deliberately obscure Brummy/Black country accent, "Oright mate you ay gor any [whatever I want] av ya?".

Curiouscat
2011-07-14, 05:46
LOL that woman is a joke of a dialogue coach.

My worst offence is putting on a deliberately obscure Brummy/Black country accent, "Oright mate you ay gor any [whatever I want] av ya?".

I do love the northern accents I just can't do em....

I have too much of a strong London accent for that :|

I can sometimes do an irish traveller one though :p

That woman ... I swear she must be crazy,,, Coffeehh I have never heard that used ever, I wonder if some American do actually think Brits "tawk layk thaat"

jr1
2011-07-14, 05:50
I do love the northern accents I just can't do em....

I have too much of a strong London accent for that :|

I can sometimes do an irish traveller one though :p



I wouldn't do an Irish traveller one in public unless I knew I was perfect, I imagine I would get a severe beating if one of them thought they were having the Michael taken out of them.




That woman ... I swear she must be crazy,,, Coffeehh I have never heard that used ever, I wonder if some American do actually think Brits "tawk layk thaat"

Some do I suppose, but they are mostly posers (Americanism alert!). I can't count the number of wannabe posh people who teach at private schools, trying to live out some sort of fantasy out of Tom Brown's Schooldays.

If you're imitating it is important to get the beats of your body language right, and in time as well. Non-English people tend to gesticulate a lot more than English people + if you are supposedly speaking a foreign language (e.g. imitating a Russian speaking English) you may be gesticulating even more than when speaking your native language, this is something many people leave out.

Curiouscat
2011-07-14, 05:57
I wouldn't do an Irish traveller one in public unless I knew I was perfect, I imagine I would get a severe beating if one of them thought they were having the Michael taken out of them.



Some do I suppose, but they are mostly posers (Americanism alert!). I can't count the number of wannabe posh people who teach at private schools, trying to live out some sort of fantasy out of Tom Brown's Schooldays.

If you're imitating it is important to get the beats of your body language right, and in time as well. Non-English people tend to gesticulate a lot more than English people + if you are supposedly speaking a foreign language (e.g. imitating a Russian speaking English) you may be gesticulating even more than when speaking your native language, this is something many people leave out.

I wouldn't do an Irish traveller in public either. Only in private, if im in the accents mood and my friends are pushing me (to be a clown)

LOL well, I didn't go to a public school, but my school was pretty damn posh, I swear my form tutor thought she was always on some BBC radio program. She would go mental correcting our "slang" haha. Years later I feel grateful for that, I can speak in a lovely British accent when needs be, not as good as the Queen does though... can't get rid of the "London"

In regards to the gesticulation thats something I haven't really noticed whether I do well or not.
I do think it comes naturally though, for example, when you do an Indian accent you have to do the "head moves" which I do quite well, and be a bit stiffer for Russian. Yet, if you hadn't mentioned it, I would't have even thought about it.. now its going to be on my mind!!

jr1
2011-07-14, 06:03
I wouldn't do an Irish traveller in public either. Only in private, if im in the accents mood and my friends are pushing me (to be a clown)

LOL well, I didn't go to a public school, but my school was pretty damn posh, I swear my form tutor thought she was always on some BBC radio program. She would go mental correcting our "slang" haha. Years later I feel grateful for that, I can speak in a lovely British accent when needs be, not as good as the Queen does though... can't get rid of the "London"



Nor did I, my private schools were strictly middle class lol. Mostly scrap metal dealers/factory owners/solicitors' kids, not really any Baronets or oligarch's kids.

People who speak like they're presenting the BBC news can be very irritating, the trick seems to be having a lot of accents in your repotoire and deploying them in appropriate situations.

A touch of Cockney can be a good thing in an accent though, you certainly have more of an advantage the further south you go; there's Estuary English and Mockney, nobody imitiates Geordie and there's certainly no Mockwegian :lol:




In regards to the gesticulation thats something I haven't really noticed whether I do well or not.
I do think it comes naturally though, for example, when you do an Indian accent you have to do the "head moves" which I do quite well, and be a bit stiffer for Russian. Yet, if you hadn't mentioned it, I would't have even thought about it.. now its going to be on my mind!![/

I have a habit of doing that don't I lol.

Curiouscat
2011-07-14, 06:10
Nor did I, my private schools were strictly middle class lol. Mostly scrap metal dealers/factory owners/solicitors' kids, not really any Baronets or oligarch's kids.

People who speak like they're presenting the BBC news can be very irritating, the trick seems to be having a lot of accents in your repotoire and deploying them in appropriate situations.

A touch of Cockney can be a good thing in an accent though, you certainly have more of an advantage the further south you go; there's Estuary English and Mockney, nobody imitiates Geordie and there's certainly no Mockwegian :lol:



I have a habit of doing that don't I lol.

Your school sounds fun, we had, so much variety at mine, some were living in the million pound homes up the road, while others were fresh immigrants from Somalia, we all mingled quite well.

It was an arty lot more than anything, although we had a high amount of kids whose parents were actors, writers, musicians and stuff.

My accent isn't much cockney, its just "London" North London to be more precise.

Is Geordie Imitable? I have no success with that!

You actually are quite a "detailed - plan and proceed" person in your thoughts, and you do project that here. Whereas I am a "skip to the important bit" kind of person. :lol:

jr1
2011-07-14, 06:20
Your school sounds fun, we had, so much variety at mine, some were living in the million pound homes up the road, while others were fresh immigrants from Somalia, we all mingled quite well.

It was an arty lot more than anything, although we had a high amount of kids whose parents were actors, writers, musicians and stuff.



Some areas, like parts of Greenwich, seem to be dominated by arty tyes. The kind of people who would send their kids to state school as a political statement, even though it's far from original since everyone of them is making it.




My accent isn't much cockney, its just "London" North London to be more precise.



The strongest London accent to my ear is Catford. Is North London getting out toward the Home Counties more?




Is Geordie Imitable? I have no success with that!



Probably but nobody wants to imitate them lol.





You actually are quite a "detailed - plan and proceed" person in your thoughts, and you do project that here. Whereas I am a "skip to the important bit" kind of person. :lol:

Why thank you.

Curiouscat
2011-07-14, 06:25
Some areas, like parts of Greenwich, seem to be dominated by arty tyes. The kind of people who would send their kids to state school as a political statement, even though it's far from original since everyone of them is making it.


Yea, my school was in the "Crouch end" part of London, we actually had a lot of Eastenders cast members living there, among other TV personalities. The schools in the area generally had a really good rep (in my days) so I guess they just sent their kids out of convenience.



The strongest London accent to my ear is Catford. Is North London getting out toward the Home Counties more?

East and South London accents are more Slang and cockney'ish. North is closer to West London, clearer with less "slang words" however, we have the F instead of TH at times.
Norf Landon mayt.


Probably but nobody wants to imitate them lol.

:lol:





Why thank you.

You're welcome.:D

ghostface
2011-07-14, 06:27
Brits should know that some "Americanisms" could possibly be the way people in sixteenth and seventeenth century (southern/eastern) England actually spoke. North Americans use word like "gotten" instead of "get" or "hire" instead of "employ". Even the American accent has been theorized to be more akin to Victorian English

jr1
2011-07-14, 06:30
Yea, my school was in the "Crouch end" part of London, we actually had a lot of Eastenders cast members living there, among other TV personalities. The schools in the area generally had a really good rep (in my days) so I guess they just sent their kids out of convenience.



Yeah, it is easier than organising alternative schooling, but I do think there is some sort of anti-elite elitism (I'm going to start sounding like synop with the zionist anti-zionism stuff :lol:). They want to be posh and educated, but they want to prove their kids can slum it with the Somalis etc Think Guardian journalists and Guardian readers.





East and South London accents are more Slang and cockney'ish. North is closer to West London, clearer with less "slang words" however, we have the F instead of TH at times.
Norf Landon mayt.



I used to assume that the F in place of TH thing was deliberately done, but I think for some people it just comes naturally (i.e. they learn to speak that way and so that is how they speak). Is there any rhyme or reason to where F is used in place of TH, or is it just whenever?

Curiouscat
2011-07-14, 06:31
Vic'bloody'torian English!! time to check and update yourselves then mate!

No actually, you are probably right.

jr1
2011-07-14, 06:32
Brits should know that some "Americanisms" could possibly be the way people in sixteenth and seventeenth century (southern/eastern) England actually spoke. North Americans use word like "gotten" instead of "get" or "hire" instead of "employ". Even the American accent has been theorized to be more akin to Victorian English

Very true, I heard that Dickensian English would have sounded closer to the present day Virginian accent than it would to any form of modern day British English.

However among the academic elite, who are the ones making a noise about the use of Americanisms (most people use them while oblivious to their foreign provenance), have very clear rules on grammar, sentence structure, spelling and use of words; they get angry when those things are, disturbed.;)

Curiouscat
2011-07-14, 06:36
Yeah, it is easier than organising alternative schooling, but I do think there is some sort of anti-elite elitism (I'm going to start sounding like synop with the zionist anti-zionism stuff :lol:). They want to be posh and educated, but they want to prove their kids can slum it with the Somalis etc Think Guardian journalists and Guardian readers.



I used to assume that the F in place of TH thing was deliberately done, but I think for some people it just comes naturally (i.e. they learn to speak that way and so that is how they speak). Is there any rhyme or reason to where F is used in place of TH, or is it just whenever?

I guess Synop is rubbing off on you :lol:
Yea, thats right, but straight after school a lot of them had private tutors at home and many went off to "drama classes" in some pretty prestigious acting schools. So although they were slumming it, they were keeping it real with their roots too :)

I haven't a clue whether there is a rhyme or reason, I think, as you said it just comes easily to some people. It also depends on how "lazy" you speak, there isn't a lot of tongue movements in English (compared to more eastern countries) so that can also affect it. I mean it takes effort to make that th sound :lol:

After being in the UK a long time, when i go to Turkey, my tongue gets knackered!! there are so many more sounds to make. However th isn't one of them. I am doomed with that LOL

jr1
2011-07-14, 06:45
I guess Synop is rubbing off on you :lol:
Yea, thats right, but straight after school a lot of them had private tutors at home and many went off to "drama classes" in some pretty prestigious acting schools. So although they were slumming it, they were keeping it real with their roots too :)



Ah yes, the tutors, the drama classes, the Chelsea tractor and the mews house. All while attending school with some very exotic characters don't you know. Talk about having your cake and eating it, or with those lot your hummus and pomegranite juice.:lol:

Everyone at my school, more or less, was hothoused by tutors to pass the 11+ but the parents didn't pretend to be anything other than pushy bastards who wanted their little darlings in the best school. So I suppose there's less hypocrisy in that sense.




I haven't a clue whether there is a rhyme or reason, I think, as you said it just comes easily to some people. It also depends on how "lazy" you speak, there isn't a lot of tongue movements in English (compared to more eastern countries) so that can also affect it. I mean it takes effort to make that th sound :lol:

After being in the UK a long time, when i go to Turkey, my tongue gets knackered!! there are so many more sounds to make. However th isn't one of them. I am doomed with that LOL

LOL.

Laziness is a factor, I personally find it much easier to speak perfect Queen's English than I do to do anything physically exerting. I do think there is an element of linguistic laziness though, perhaps people's tongues literally get weak through underuse (in the sense that it is a massive exertion to enunciate) so they just use lazy, replacements.

Perhaps the lack of tongue movement is testimony to European neanderthal roots? The neanderthals would have had a very simple sort of language, and their mouths weren't made to complex words at all.

I have noticed how lazy you can be with English if you are so inclined, anything from a grunt to a lazy 'Yeah' to 'Yes' can qualify and be understood by others as meaning Yes . I don't think you get quite so much leeway in French, for example.

Curiouscat
2011-07-14, 07:22
Ah yes, the tutors, the drama classes, the Chelsea tractor and the mews house. All while attending school with some very exotic characters don't you know. Talk about having your cake and eating it, or with those lot your hummus and pomegranite juice.:lol:

Everyone at my school, more or less, was hothoused by tutors to pass the 11+ but the parents didn't pretend to be anything other than pushy bastards who wanted their little darlings in the best school. So I suppose there's less hypocrisy in that sense.


Well, I reckon this is why the UK has a much "nicer" multicultural society, than in "other" parts of the world, where usually intermixing of classes and ethnicities doesn't occur.




LOL.

Laziness is a factor, I personally find it much easier to speak perfect Queen's English than I do to do anything physically exerting. I do think there is an element of linguistic laziness though, perhaps people's tongues literally get weak through underuse (in the sense that it is a massive exertion to enunciate) so they just use lazy, replacements.

Perhaps the lack of tongue movement is testimony to European neanderthal roots? The neanderthals would have had a very simple sort of language, and their mouths weren't made to complex words at all.

I have noticed how lazy you can be with English if you are so inclined, anything from a grunt to a lazy 'Yeah' to 'Yes' can qualify and be understood by others as meaning Yes . I don't think you get quite so much leeway in French, for example.

Oh there is definitely linguistic laziness. It depends, sometimes, we just mmmm instead of saying yes, I mean, how much lazier can we get? murmuring our response:| .
I suppose the neandrethals did have quite an easy go of it, but then again, I wouldn't think that they didn't have a lot to talk about, lol, go hunting, eat food, get in cave for action :evilgrin: should suffice.

You certainly don't get that leeway in French, nor many other languages, as I said the more East you go the more tongue movements you make and even throat movements etc...

Particula
2011-07-14, 08:41
Does she use Americanisms?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IdfJySxOb6U
Can Americans understand her?

---------- Post added 2011-07-14 at 07:58 ----------

I've found this on the internet

As I said above, we can understand the kind of accents you hear in most TV shows like Seinfeld, for eg. However, we do have to concentrate to fully understand rather than just let the language flow over you like we do with English accents. I assume the accents on programmes like BEverley Hills 90210 or things in Orange Country are Californian ones - they are quite difficult to understand. When it comes to accents from some parts of america like in 'True Blood' for example, we need subtitles or we miss probably 70% of the dialogue. American is just anbother foreign accent to us. – DaveLancs Jul 6 at 19:01
is that true?
Do the British have to concentrate in order to be able to understand American Southern accents?

as a non-native English speaker and someone who loves English and is still learning the language
American accents are much more easy to understand than British accents especially those from the North like Mancunian accent for example,American sounds more clear while british sounds like If they had something stuck in their throats and American English is much more easier to pronunce than British English

Curiouscat
2011-07-14, 09:49
Does she use Americanisms?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IdfJySxOb6U
Can Americans understand her?

---------- Post added 2011-07-14 at 07:58 ----------

I've found this on the internet

is that true?
Do the British have to concentrate in order to be able to understand American Southern accents?

as a non-native English speaker and someone who loves English and is still learning the language
American accents are much more easy to understand than British accents especially those from the North like Mancunian accent for example,American sounds more clear while british sounds like If they had something stuck in their throats and American English is much more easier to pronunce than British English

True blood is a piece of cake to understand for me.

The Movie True Grit was definitely harder at times, especially the court scene, a few American friends told me that it was difficult for them too, so I felt relieved.

American English is really easy to understand as long as there aren't many slang words used in between.

I have, never heard of anyone, not understanding American English in my years in London.

Firmus
2011-07-14, 10:51
True blood is a piece of cake to understand for me.

The Movie True Grit was definitely harder at times, especially the court scene, a few American friends told me that it was difficult for them too, so I felt relieved.

American English is really easy to understand as long as there aren't many slang words used in between.

I have, never heard of anyone, not understanding American English in my years in London.

No one can beat the accent from Arkansas :D, it is like they speak another language.

Curiouscat
2011-07-14, 10:53
For example?

Particula
2011-07-14, 14:10
True blood is a piece of cake to understand for me.

The Movie True Grit was definitely harder at times, especially the court scene, a few American friends told me that it was difficult for them too, so I felt relieved.

American English is really easy to understand as long as there aren't many slang words used in between.

I have, never heard of anyone, not understanding American English in my years in London.

I've also read that Scandinavians are very good at imitating American accents while it's very difficult for the british
is that true?