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Cinderella
2012-01-10, 12:51
I cannot believe it! :mad:

I'm studying an Access Proof to get into University, next year. And I have catalan, spanish, english, biology and chemistry as subjects. Well, I'm going to tell about english classes...

The requirements are ridiculous!

- No oral proof. Just writting.
- Easy sentences like: I have read one book this morning.
- A level of vocabulary that a fifteen-year-old boy or girl could do, when this is supossed to be a english level to a universitary person.

And people in general tried hard to make the exercises (I didn't make them because of how easy they are). Some of them complaining how difficult is english. And everybody asking me a lot of things; I recognize I'm not Shakespeare, of course, but next to my classmates it seemed I was.

1- I am wondering if this poor level of english is also in Southern Europe countries, with a high level of unemployment like Italy, Portugal, Greece...

2- Is it strange we have a 20% of unemployed people here? Now I felt we deserve it!


:sick:

3- Is it related the level of english of a population and the quality of their jobs and percentage of unemployment?

ducktard
2012-01-10, 13:07
Haha! The English classes here are really easy too! I get more than 90% marks without studying at all. While my classmates struggle.

Loxias
2012-01-10, 13:24
The English level in France is also rather dismal. Although unemployment is not that high (yet).

Sakarisker
2012-01-10, 13:34
Many jobs require knowledge of English although it is not necessary for the job in question, but relate unemployed with knowledge of English is another of your nonsense.

I think the lack of English in the countries of southern Europe is basically because it is more difficult to learn for someone Latin-speaker than a Germanic/Nordic-speaker, if the world language was French or Italian instead of English, I'm sure the opposite would happen.

Vallespir
2012-01-10, 13:58
The following quotation is borrowed from the University entrance examinations (http://www.gencat.cat/economia/ur/doc_un/pau_angl11sl.pdf) held in Catalonia in September 2011.


DIGITAL AND TRADITIONAL TOOLS
Do the latest social networks encourage strong relationships or weak ones? Generally speaking, digital ties aren’t as powerful as the friendships and commitments we make in person.

Twitter and Facebook, when used together with other tools of human connectedness, can be extremely useful. Digital networks haven’t replaced physical togetherness and conversation, even if it sometimes feels that way. Yes, it is true that some people have effectively moved their entire lives online, and the media have for years covered every digital phenomenon, no matter how trivial.

Thankfully, however, the silly use of social networks is beginning to die down. What’s emerging in its place is a more intelligent and constructive view of the digital future, one that embraces the enormous promise of these technologies while accepting their limitations.

Twitter and Facebook aren’t going to save the world. But when used alongside other tools of human connectedness—including some very old ones, like the face-to-face conversations, meetings and protests that drove the civil rights movement in the USA—the new technologies can be extremely useful. We can learn a lot from our digital life and make real friends there. But if we never turn off the screen and don’t use those gains in our life, what use would they be? Digital networking and more traditional forms of communication aren’t mutually exclusive—they feed into each other.

American writer Clay Shirky tells in his book Here Comes Everybody, about how, through the wonders of digital networking, a New Yorker recovered a lost cell phone. His book is full of stories about really important social and organizational change that was significantly helped along—if not entirely created—by the newer gadgets.

Change begins with great ideas. Shirky says that among the 50 or so people he follows on Twitter are the Dalai Lama and a community of Benedictine monks who make writing journals and other paper products with the intention of slowing down our over-busy minds. “When I pick up a valuable new thought on Twitter, I try to take it with me into the non-digital world, where we should all be spending more time these days,” he says. “That’s where the real revolutions happen.”

Professor Rheinghold, from Berkeley University, said about Twitter: “You have to learn how to make it add value rather than subtract hours from one’s day. Certainly, it may cause distraction. But it also makes possible the formation of forums called personal learning networks”. He explains that he values Twitter because of its openness, its immediacy, variety, reciprocity, its channel to multiple publics, its potential for allowing networks to become communities and the mass collaborations it enables.

The Web can be a labyrinth of abusive language and misinformation, but it can also be an accessible and inexpensive medium for community-building and political activism. The difference lies not in the technology but in the literacy—know-how is the critical difference. Those who gain the know-how to transform networks into movements might gain the keys to
power—for better or worse—in coming decades.

Text adapted from The New York Times (September 30, 2010)

commitment: compromís / compromiso
connectedness: relació, comunicació / relación, comunicación
to embrace: incloure, abraçar / incluir, abarcar
to drive: moure, impulsar / mover, impulsar
gain: guany / ganancia
know-how: coneixements, experiència / conocimientos, experiencia
2I do not think it is 'basic English'.

Falkata
2012-01-10, 14:06
I was 17 when I did those test. You´re like 30 years old so no wonder your english level is higher.

English level (written) is not low in Spain. Actually while I was abroad I´ve noticed that it´s even something like medium-high compared with other european countries. Our (big) problem comes with our oral skills. They are clearly below average.

Particula
2012-01-10, 14:24
I was 17 when I did those test. You´re like 30 years old so no wonder your english level is higher.

English level (written) is not low in Spain. Actually while I was abroad I´ve noticed that it´s even something like medium-high compared with other european countries. Our (big) problem comes with our oral skills. They are clearly below average.

I think Spanish English teachers suck! like my teacher Mª José(just imagine an andalucian woman speaking "ingrishhh" ):lol:

I learned English by myself,they don't even know how to pronunce correctly
but If you go to a private academy of English in Spain you can get a good level of English,I also think that Spain has the disverange of dubbing every movie or serie while germanic and latin American countries use subtitles and only dub cartoons

XMidnightX
2012-01-10, 14:28
I went to Rome for a vacation about 9 years ago. The tourism workers knew enough English, but outside that the average person did not understand very much.

Loxias
2012-01-10, 14:29
I think Spanish English teachers suck! like my teacher Mª José(just imagine an andalucian woman speaking "ingrishhh" ):lol:

I learned English by myself,they don't even know how to pronunce correctly
but If you go to a private academy of English in Spain you can get a good level of English,I also think that Spain has the disverange of dubbing every movie or serie while germanic and latin American countries use subtitles and only dub cartoons

I think dubbing is one of the main reasons too.

Kwestos
2012-01-10, 14:44
I cannot believe it! :mad:

I'm studying an Access Proof to get into University, next year. And I have catalan, spanish, english, biology and chemistry as subjects. Well, I'm going to tell about english classes...

The requirements are ridiculous!


- Easy sentences like: I have read one book this morning.


Actually this one is not that easy, I believe you can use present perfect when its still morning on, but when you say that in the evening you should use past form- but i am not sure.

Falkata
2012-01-10, 14:51
I think Spanish English teachers suck! like my teacher Mª José(just imagine an andalucian woman speaking "ingrishhh" ):lol:

I learned English by myself,they don't even know how to pronunce correctly
but If you go to a private academy of English in Spain you can get a good level of English,I also think that Spain has the disverange of dubbing every movie or serie while germanic and latin American countries use subtitles and only dub cartoons

Indeed. Non-native teachers who haven´t lived abroad during too much time can be enough for leaning grammar,ortography... during the first courses.

But in the superior courses I think only natives (or spaniards with some years of experience in an anglo country) should be allowed to teach our students. Otherwise we will always suck at listening, pronouncing...

The American
2012-01-10, 15:08
I'm pretty sure that there's a few dolts in the U.S. that'd have trouble on the same test.

whitefan415
2012-01-10, 19:33
With million of British Expat living in Spain, Spaniards should have no problem to have hands-on interaction in English.

Angharad
2012-01-10, 19:36
The level of English speakers here in Southern California is also poor. I read somewhere that most people in Los Angeles are functionally illiterate. That is that they read below the 5th grade level. Many have problems with spoken English as well. Much of this is because about 40% are also foreign born. Native born persons are usually a little better, but their level of education doesn't speak highly of the educational system here.

towelie
2012-01-10, 19:39
Movies and shows with subs instead of dubbing does help a lot, many people around the world become fluent like that.
I cannot understand for the life of me watching stuff dubbed.

Cinderella
2012-01-10, 19:45
With million of British Expat living in Spain, Spaniards should have no problem to have hands-on interaction in English.

I'm not spanish.

Anyway, in Catalonia western immigration (anglos, germans, dutchs...) are a little minority who come here to enjoy their holidays. The most of them don't even speak catalan because, as I said, they are here in constant comings and goings. This girl from North Carolina is one exception, but because her husband is catalan. (http://youtu.be/8D33JksAXAQ)

The only immigrants I've seen speaking english correctly are from India and Pakistan (maybe because of their british past, I don't know).. And maybe some black people from Africa.

The American
2012-01-10, 19:46
With million of British Expat living in Spain, Spaniards should have no problem to have hands-on interaction in English.

Some Spaniards on some of the discussion boards I've been to compare it to an infestation or an invasion. :lol:

Cinderella
2012-01-10, 19:48
Many have problems with spoken English as well. Much of this is because about 40% are also foreign born.

I've read something of that in this forum (people who don't get a conversation in english and you must repeat some words four or five times) and I'm wondering why employers give their jobs. It's amazing...

The American
2012-01-10, 19:50
I've read something of that in this forum (people who don't get a conversation in english and you must repeat some words four or five times) and I'm wondering why employers give their jobs. It's amazing...

Simple: the immigrant people work for peanuts and/or under the table (no questions asked); the government forces them (the employers) to hire minorities or they get tax-breaks for hiring minorities or they're afraid of a discrimination-based lawsuit.

Etc.

Cinderella
2012-01-10, 19:50
Some Spaniards on some of the discussion boards I've been to compare it to an infestation or an invasion. :lol:

About the 70-80% of my english class are ethnically spaniards. That may mean that catalan population is going out abroad, meanly to Germany and USA.

:(

The American
2012-01-10, 19:55
About the 70-80% of my english class are ethnically spaniards. That may mean that catalan population is going out abroad, meanly to Germany and USA.

:(

Well, in this day and age there's money to be made overseas, hence alot of people travel abroad to work and/or live. These Spaniards in your class, how old are they?

Cinderella
2012-01-10, 20:03
Well, in this day and age there's money to be made overseas, hence alot of people travel abroad to work and/or live. These Spaniards in your class, how old are they?

About my age, the most of them. But I've found a woman of about 50 years old.

People are becoming aware that having a job without higher studies are more and more difficult. The "golden years" of 2000-2007 will no longer come back again. The debt of the planet is huge (some people talk about the debt of Greece to be paid along 50 years) and robotization and technology are replacing the industrial work. So this kind of centers to study a careers are filling with people. I don't know the situation in US, but in Europe is in that way...

The American
2012-01-10, 20:09
About my age, the most of them. But I've found a woman of about 50 years old.

People are becoming aware that having a job without higher studies are more and more difficult. The "golden years" of 2000-2007 will no longer come back again (I've got an associate's degree and that's pretty useless). The debt of the planet is huge (some people talk about the debt of Greece to be paid along 50 years) and robotization and technology are replacing the industrial work. So this kind of centers to study a careers are filling with people. I don't know the situation in US, but in Europe is in that way...

It's a similar situation in the U.S., although there's more job vacancies to fill here in the U.S. (service sector, etc.) than in any one of the European countries. People are looking for work, but it's like you say, to get a more ideal job requires a higher education, which most Americans don't have. About 1/3 of the country has a college degree of some sort (two-year degree, four-year degree, certificate, etc.) but even this isn't always enough. Adult education is pretty common (night school, part-time school, online school, etc.) and there're many adults in their 30s and above who're looking for a second career (like me). :o

Jobs in heavy industry, manufacturing, construction, etc. are giving way to service sector-type jobs.

Triskel
2012-01-10, 20:24
Those exams are for people older than 25, they're much easier because theorically those students couldn't approve the ordinary entrance exams which I made when I was 17. Obviously the university wants to earn money with their registrations. I had a better level than you and my english mark was 6, so it wasn't so easy.

Spanish :lol: I'd pay to see one class

impasible
2012-01-10, 20:30
cinder....

'CATALONIA IS NOT SPAIN' is all the english you need to know to accomplish your objectives in life.

ah... who was a committed separatist like you!

Firmus
2012-01-10, 20:30
Hmm if Northern Europe is doing pretty well in English that's because... well these countries speak West Germanic Languages related to English. The French know some written English but suck at speaking it.

Madden11
2012-01-10, 20:33
Wow your English levels are easier than my German levels here. When I was in high school, I had to take exams every semester for German. We had written, oral and listening. :|

Falkata
2012-01-10, 20:36
Hmm if Northern Europe is doing pretty well in English that's because... well these countries speak West Germanic Languages related to English. The French know some written English but suck at speaking it.

That´s an important reason. But also because speaking swedish/norwegian/dutch/wathever you´re not goint anywhere.
Speaking spanish you can communicate with millions of people all around the world

---------- Post added 2012-01-10 at 21:38 ----------


Wow your English levels are easier than my German levels here. When I was in high school, I had to take exams every semester for German. We had written, oral and listening. :|

Don´t offence but in general most americans (and brits) suck at languages. They speak english so they think that they dont need more. In the other hand dutch people,swiss, swedes... often know 2-3 languages

Vallespir
2012-01-10, 20:43
Wow your English levels are easier than my German levels here. When I was in high school, I had to take exams every semester for German. We had written, oral and listening. :|

How much harder than this (http://www.forumbiodiversity.com/showpost.php?p=661184&postcount=5)?

Madden11
2012-01-10, 20:48
How much harder than this (http://www.forumbiodiversity.com/showpost.php?p=661184&postcount=5)?

Lol. I can't judge because I speak English. That looks like an article you would read in a newspaper here. :P

And I was in high school. I was responding to the OP, because she said that they don't have an oral portion.

Cinderella
2012-01-10, 20:56
Those exams are for people older than 25, they're much easier because theorically those students couldn't approve the ordinary entrance exams which I made when I was 17. Obviously the university wants to earn money with their registrations. I had a better level than you and my english mark was 6, so it wasn't so easy.

Spanish :lol: I'd pay to see one class

That's the point: all subjects are more easy than High School ("when I was 17" as you said) so that people can enter more easily into university. Like we were fools.

Anyway, what I meant in this thread was that: the ridiculous level of english here.

Spanish classes are about reading one text and talking about literary figures, analizing sentences...

---------- Post added 2012-01-10 at 21:58 ----------


Wow your English levels are easier than my German levels here. When I was in high school, I had to take exams every semester for German. We had written, oral and listening. :|

If I was anglo-speaker, I would learn german... no doubt. The only "fear" I would have were the differences between the official language and the local dialects.

Vallespir
2012-01-10, 21:14
That's the point: all subjects are more easy than High School ("when I was 17" as you said) so that people can enter more easily into university. Like we were fools.

Anyway, what I meant in this thread was that: the ridiculous level of english here.

In my opinion your English is quite poor...

Rick
2012-01-10, 21:16
Then it is probably a common feature of countries that speak romance languages


And people in general tried hard to make the exercises (I didn't make them because of how easy they are). Some of them complaining how difficult is english. And everybody asking me a lot of things; I recognize I'm not Shakespeare, of course, but next to my classmates it seemed I was.

1- I am wondering if this poor level of english is also in Southern Europe countries, with a high level of unemployment like Italy, Portugal, Greece...

2- Is it strange we have a 20% of unemployed people here? Now I felt we deserve it!


:sick:

3- Is it related the level of english of a population and the quality of their jobs and percentage of unemployment?

However, a different register would be more suited, you should not blame like that in criticizing, speech requires a certain formal attitude not to exacerbate the debate.

Madden11
2012-01-10, 22:34
That's the point: all subjects are more easy than High School ("when I was 17" as you said) so that people can enter more easily into university. Like we were fools.

Anyway, what I meant in this thread was that: the ridiculous level of english here.

Spanish classes are about reading one text and talking about literary figures, analizing sentences...

---------- Post added 2012-01-10 at 21:58 ----------



If I was anglo-speaker, I would learn german... no doubt. The only "fear" I would have were the differences between the official language and the local dialects.

I have a problem with speaking Spanish. Since English is a Germanic language, I learned German before Spanish. I think in German and English when learning Spanish. I failed that class, because of the differences. Latin languages aren't good for me to learn. Lol. The pronunciation is different.

I am trying to learn Somali, and pronunciation is easier for me to learn, because of the German. Whereas if I had not learned German, it might have been harder to pronounce the letters in Somali.

Danielion
2012-01-10, 23:15
The level of English in the Romance-speaking world tends to suck to my knowledge. By the way, whenever I watch English-speaking YouTube commentators I notice the public is usually centered around English-speaking countries (duh), followed by Germanic-speaking. Slavic Europe scores as little better than Romance Europe (except for Romania at times). Finland also tends have a lot of traffic to English-speaking videos.

---------- Post added 2012-01-11 at 00:16 ----------


I have a problem with speaking Spanish. Since English is a Germanic language, I learned German before Spanish. I think in German and English when learning Spanish. I failed that class, because of the differences. Latin languages aren't good for me to learn. Lol. The pronunciation is different.


I find Romance languages (French mainly) to be quite illogical. Maybe my brain cannot grasp them well enough. :)

Firmus
2012-01-10, 23:33
I find Romance languages (French mainly) to be quite illogical. Maybe my brain cannot grasp them well enough. :)


English language lacks depth, it is definitely a practical or direct language unlike French which is above all a rhetorical twisted language. French = subjective, English = objective (minus savvy Latin words)

In a nutshell, if you want to grasp something very fast read it in English (the difficulty in English lays on Latin double meaning words), if you want to express yourself do it in French.

I did notice that Anglo politicians often talks with slogans or simple/clear ideas while in the same time French politicians give it into a slew of words (the devil hides himself in the details like we say in French).

Danielion
2012-01-10, 23:41
English language lacks depth, it is definitely a practical or direct language unlike French which is above all a rhetorical twisted language. French = subjective, English = objective (minus savvy Latin words)

In a nutshell, if you want to grasp something very fast read it in English (the difficulty in English lays on Latin double meaning words), if you want to express yourself do it in French.

I did notice that Anglo politicians often talks with slogans or simple/clear ideas while in the same time French politicians give it into a slew of words (the devil hides himself in the details like we say in French).

Well, I always says that Germanic languages are masculine and Romance languages feminine. Germanic languages are logical and precise. Romance languages are more poetic and fit for expressing emotions.

Loxias
2012-01-10, 23:46
I wouldn't call English precise, it's a highly analytical language (more than romance languages), where grammatical role is implicit (instead of explicitly stated with a case system like in German). It has a very ad hoc and spontaneous quality which isn't necessarily precise or logical.
Although the historic predominance of positivism in the English sphere compared to the rest of Europe has to be rooted in language in a way or another (ie: English being more objective than any other European languages, German included).

AlexDelarge
2012-01-11, 00:18
Is the level of english such an important thing? Do you use english in your every day life in your country? As far as i know people don't speak english in Spain or Catalonia.

Danielion
2012-01-11, 00:21
Is the level of english such an important thing? Do you use english in your every day life in your country? As far as i know people don't speak english in Spain or Catalonia.

Well, I guess it makes a population a bit less susceptible to Americanisation, but not too much when you take into account the crappy dubs they watch of American sitcoms and films. Nothing wrong with some Americanisation, but you know what I mean. Lack of loving your own culture, very frequent in some circles. A cultural powerhouse like the USA does that for the good and the bad. It's okay.

ageladakos
2012-01-11, 00:22
I cannot believe it! :mad:

I'm studying an Access Proof to get into University, next year. And I have catalan, spanish, english, biology and chemistry as subjects. Well, I'm going to tell about english classes...

The requirements are ridiculous!

- No oral proof. Just writting.
- Easy sentences like: I have read one book this morning.
- A level of vocabulary that a fifteen-year-old boy or girl could do, when this is supossed to be a english level to a universitary person.

And people in general tried hard to make the exercises (I didn't make them because of how easy they are). Some of them complaining how difficult is english. And everybody asking me a lot of things; I recognize I'm not Shakespeare, of course, but next to my classmates it seemed I was.

1- I am wondering if this poor level of english is also in Southern Europe countries, with a high level of unemployment like Italy, Portugal, Greece...

2- Is it strange we have a 20% of unemployed people here? Now I felt we deserve it!


:sick:

3- Is it related the level of english of a population and the quality of their jobs and percentage of unemployment?

what is your field of study?

impasible
2012-01-11, 00:26
Well, I guess it makes a population a bit less susceptible to Americanisation, but not too much when you take into account the crappy dubs they watch of American sitcoms and films.

crappy dubs?

well, I have always heard that spanish dubs are the best.
At least is what spaniards dubbers say about themselves.

Danielion
2012-01-11, 00:27
crappy dubs?

well, I have always heard that spanish dubs are the best.
At least is what spaniards dubbers say about themselves.

Dubs are always deteriorating the original in some way, IMHO.

AlexDelarge
2012-01-11, 00:28
Well, I guess it makes a population a bit less susceptible to Americanisation, but not too much when you take into account the crappy dubs they watch of American sitcoms and films.

Exposure would be much greater if they subtitled everything like we do here.

Firmus
2012-01-11, 00:30
crappy dubs?

well, I have always heard that spanish dubs are the best.
At least is what spaniards dubbers say about themselves.

I saw Dexter in Spanish and I laughed my ass out with Erik King's dubbing, btw French they suck as well.
I can't watch a dubbed version of an American/English movie or TV series, you miss all the spirit.

Ubirajara
2012-01-11, 00:33
In my opinion, the best way to learn a foreign language is having lessons with a private teacher who is a native speaker of the language you want to learn. Practicing it also helps I guess (traveling abroad, etc). The second language may also be easier to learn once one has mastered a language different from the group the one you are a native speaker of. One can have a quick overview of a language by looking at the basic adverbs, conjunctions, verbs, prepositions and vocabulary. How distant the language is to your own will probably be the main reason of how difficult it will be. English was more difficult to me than French or Spanish: I came to be able to read texts in French or Spanish much faster than I did with English, and learning to speak them was much easier too. But how complex the language is may also account for it, Latin probably would be more difficult than Spanish or French, since Latin grammar is more complex. The same goes for German as compared with English. German grammar is more difficult than English grammar.

Cinderella
2012-01-11, 19:06
what is your field of study?

Sciencies of Health. But the english subject (as I said, with poor requirements) is obligated to access to any career.

ageladakos
2012-01-11, 19:12
Sciencies of Health. But the english subject (as I said, with poor requirements) is obligated to access to any career.

why do you need english to study sciencies of health?
english is irrelevant to your field lol.

Dragoslav
2012-01-11, 19:15
Most employers hiring young Bulgarians take English for granted. I work for an international company. English is used in 80% of the communication. One of the reasons can be that I work mostly with foreigners too.

Cinderella
2012-01-11, 19:17
why do you need english to study sciencies of health?
english is irrelevant to your field lol.

I told you. There are subjects obligated to study any career (since Medicine from History, whatever), and english is one of them.

;)

ageladakos
2012-01-11, 19:35
I told you. There are subjects obligated to study any career (since Medicine from History, whatever), and english is one of them.

;)

well, being able to understand terminology in english is a totaly different thing from knowing how to properly speak it.
i do not see why all the fuzz about this, your university demands what your university needs.

abenjaldún
2012-01-11, 20:23
Another stupid thread made by this idiotic charnega self-hater.

Long live the Black Legend!

The American
2012-01-11, 21:21
Long live the myth of the Black Legend!

Properly corrected.

impasible
2012-01-12, 01:03
Another stupid thread made by this idiotic charnega self-hater.

Long live the Black Legend!

do you feel injured cinder?

well, that's what you do with spaniards most of the time...

------

why the black legend?

cinder is more of the eternal whiny and good for nothing legend,

guiresende
2012-01-12, 01:13
Same in Brazil, I will post here a question of the test used by most universities to select students

English:
http://i.imgur.com/3mBqH.png
Spanish::
http://i.imgur.com/YAxGf.png

asingh
2012-01-12, 04:48
The only immigrants I've seen speaking english correctly are from India and Pakistan (maybe because of their british past, I don't know).. And maybe some black people from Africa.
For India, it is mandatory that English be taught in all school from 1-12. Probably the people you saw were from big cities, and English is taught to them at par with US standards. Nothing to do with the British past.


I've read something of that in this forum (people who don't get a conversation in english and you must repeat some words four or five times) and I'm wondering why employers give their jobs. It's amazing...

What are you trying to say here, really does not make sense. Job, where...? What type of conversation..? Which people..? People here..?

Bittereinder
2012-01-12, 05:44
All this talk about languages being 'difficult' is ultimately irrelevant. Notice how, strangely, no one seems to think their own native language is difficult. Basically, if you're interested in learning another language, the first thing you have to do is tear down the imagined barrier between your native language and the language that you want to master. The exact same principles are at work in both cases, the only thing different is the timing. And how did you learn your own language as a child? By listening, speaking, reading and writing it - in other words, by living in it. Rather than dutifully taking weekly classes of language X, people should read books, watch shows, surf to websites, etc. that are in that language.


For India, it is mandatory that English be taught in all school from 1-12. Probably the people you saw were from big cities, and English is taught to them at par with US standards. Nothing to do with the British past.

How widespread is English in India? Are there people who speak it as a first language outside of the (tiny) Anglo-Indian community? I think the problem with English as a lingua franca in India is that they already have Hindi as the national language, even if English is more neutral since it's not tied to a specific region.

asingh
2012-01-12, 06:08
How widespread is English in India? Are there people who speak it as a first language outside of the (tiny) Anglo-Indian community? I think the problem with English as a lingua franca in India is that they already have Hindi as the national language, even if English is more neutral since it's not tied to a specific region.

~11.4% of the population can speak it. With 0.02% being first language speakers. As per 2001.

Now, that is as per Wikification of the search string. "Hindi" is not specified as the National language, but as the official language (with the Devnagri script), and English being the second official language. Though correct, English is more neutral and is more unifying for the regions since, each has its own. For example, when I went to Chennai, I used English to converse, since I do not speak/understand Tamil.

ducktard
2012-01-12, 13:07
^ He he! I speak English better than my Native language.

Falkata
2012-01-12, 13:51
^ He he! I speak English better than my Native language.

Well, that´s kind of sad actually

ducktard
2012-01-12, 14:16
^ Not really. I was raised hearing a mix of my language and English. I've been learning English as my first language(in school) since Kindergarden . So, it was bound to happen.

---------- Post added 2012-01-12 at 20:47 ----------

We weren't even allowed to speak Malayalam at school, to make it worse.

asingh
2012-01-12, 15:05
^^
I doubt you can count in your native language. Is it Mallu..(slang)...?

ducktard
2012-01-12, 15:15
^^
I doubt you can count in your native language. Is it Mallu..(slang)...?

Manglish, like Hinglish. Mallu is a racial slur,I think.

---------- Post added 2012-01-12 at 21:47 ----------

Yes, I CAN count in my native language. But, I usually use English for counting.

asingh
2012-01-12, 15:30
Manglish, like Hinglish. Mallu is a racial slur,I think.

---------- Post added 2012-01-12 at 21:47 ----------

Yes, I CAN count in my native language. But, I usually use English for counting.

I meant it as a short form for Malayalam. It is used quite often. Though I apologize if you felt it was racial.

Sorry again. Point being, I know a ton of Hindi speaking people who can probably count till 20 in Hindi.
:)

ducktard
2012-01-12, 16:15
^ He he. I wasn't offended. (:

Bittereinder
2012-01-12, 22:47
^ He he! I speak English better than my Native language.

So, do you generally use English to communicate in your daily life? English is a very useful language, but it must be tough not knowing the local language well, especially once you get outside the urban areas. I'm always interested in the linguistic situation of other countries; must be because I'm Flemish.

asingh
2012-01-13, 05:05
So, do you generally use English to communicate in your daily life? English is a very useful language, but it must be tough not knowing the local language well, especially once you get outside the urban areas. I'm always interested in the linguistic situation of other countries; must be because I'm Flemish.

It depends, at least in my case. I use equally well. For example, I always talk to my sister in English, and she the same. Office is always English. Not out of mandate, but just comfort. I use Hindi with close friends, or people out on the street. But at times there is an involuntary switch. Example: I see someone from upper middle class, and I need to ask the way, I will ask in English. Though if I need to ask a cab driver for a ride, it will be Hindi. The fluctuation is immense.

ducktard
2012-01-13, 13:44
So, do you generally use English to communicate in your daily life? English is a very useful language, but it must be tough not knowing the local language well, especially once you get outside the urban areas. I'm always interested in the linguistic situation of other countries; must be because I'm Flemish.

More like a mix of both. Mostly English with a bit of my Native language.

Angharad
2012-01-14, 09:33
Sciencies of Health. But the english subject (as I said, with poor requirements) is obligated to access to any career.

FYI, in the USA this is usually referred to as "Heath Sciences" rather than Sciences of Health.

Danielion
2012-01-14, 14:56
Personally I couldn't handle speaking a hotchpotch language. Many youngsters speak Dunglish when they cannot express themselves in Dutch, but that type of attitude I find annoying and I blame laziness from some. They don't speak better English neither, they just butcher language in general.

ducktard
2012-01-14, 14:58
^ haha! I know a few guys like that!