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View Full Version : Which NWB people is still living most similar to the slavery days?



Maroon King
2012-06-04, 20:26
Which NWB people are living most similar to the slavery days? Which group is still performing the same types of jobs the Europeans brought their African ancestors to the Americas for?

I saw this video of contemporary Black people in rural Colombia and just thought this is no different from the slavery days. Black ppl in a mine digging up gold for someone else so they can just get some food on their table

http://youtu.be/i7qPfnPlYSM

Maroon King
2012-06-07, 01:07
Maybe this topic is too strong for this forum to discuss....Mods close it down if you want.

2kayglobal
2012-06-07, 01:13
Nah, it's not too strong. Can't be worse than my thread (http://www.forumbiodiversity.com/showthread.php?t=34035). Good topic here but I have no knowlege to answer it.

Maroon King, slightly off topic, but I wanted to ask. You mentioned in another thread the stock africans in Jamaica vs USA were - (African) Gold Coast, and Bantu.

- What place in Africa are the blacks in Colombia from? (and Panamá, Venuzela, assuming it's generally the same for that coastline of northern south america)

Arminfrench
2012-06-07, 01:16
Haitian people for example arent living in those conditions of slavery...Im afraid they are facing a worse scenario.

Maroon King
2012-06-07, 01:17
- What place in Africa are the blacks in Colombia from? (and Panamá, Venuzela, assuming it's generally the same for that coastline of northern south america)

check this thread http://www.forumbiodiversity.com/showthread.php?t=19357

---------- Post added 2012-06-06 at 20:17 ----------


Haitian people for example arent living in those conditions of slavery...Im afraid they are facing a worse scenario.

No, because Haitians destructed anything that reminded them of slavery when they became independent.

Arminfrench
2012-06-07, 01:32
check this thread http://www.forumbiodiversity.com/showthread.php?t=19357

---------- Post added 2012-06-06 at 20:17 ----------



No, because Haitians destructed anything that reminded them of slavery when they became independent.


Nevertheless their living conditions could be worse tho, they live in deprivation.

jibarodepr
2012-06-07, 01:34
Nevertheless their living conditions could be worse tho, they live in deprivation.They live like in Africa, dictator governants and tribal way of living

Arminfrench
2012-06-07, 01:39
They live like in Africa, dictator governants and tribal way of living

Geez man didnt you see how they were living after that eathquake?... poor people even slaves had a better life!!!.

Maroon King
2012-06-07, 01:41
Geez man didnt you see how they were living after that eathquake?... poor people even slaves had a better life!!!.

Ok but they are "free" and freedom costs. BTW that's actually an argument I heard in Colombia by some Black thinkers. That Black people in Colombia were better off during slavery, because at least they were fed, unlike now where some even die of hunger.

jibarodepr
2012-06-07, 01:41
Geez man didnt you see how they were living after that eathquake?... poor people even slaves had a better life!!!.Yes, earthquake is "la gota que colmó la copa" it made their situation worse.

2kayglobal
2012-06-07, 02:27
check this thread http://www.forumbiodiversity.com/showthread.php?t=19357

Cool. Thanks. That's much more detailed than I had hoped for. :)

Maroon King
2012-06-07, 02:34
That's much more detailed than I had hoped for. :)

Why, you don't like reading long?

2kayglobal
2012-06-07, 02:38
Why, you don't like reading long?

Hehe, no on the contrary, I ment as in "more detailed than I dared hope for". ;)

I read the thread it was good. Thanks.

Jedi
2012-06-07, 02:44
Ok but they are "free" and freedom costs. BTW that's actually an argument I heard in Colombia by some Black thinkers. That Black people in Colombia were better off during slavery, because at least they were fed, unlike now where some even die of hunger.

The thing is, here in American media, they keep us dumbed down so we keep our attentions to our computers and cell phones. All the terrible things that go on and we have no idea. This is sad for Colombian people. People think Colombia, they think Shakira and coffee.

Maroon King
2012-06-09, 00:07
The thing is, here in American media, they keep us dumbed down so we keep our attentions to our computers and cell phones. All the terrible things that go on and we have no idea. This is sad for Colombian people. People think Colombia, they think Shakira and coffee.

LOL, they mostly think cocaine.

amerinese
2012-06-09, 00:23
Stereotypically speaking. I think of FARC and Los Pepes etc. Labs in the jungle. Assassins with UZIs on the back of motorcycles in a hillside urban slum. I don't think of Shakira.

cafman21
2012-06-09, 00:33
Not to mention that Colombian druglords are using West Africa to put their drugs in Europe. But the first thing that comes to my mind when I hear Colombia is Shakira and Valderrama. (and Radamel Falcão) :lol:

Maroon King
2012-06-09, 00:43
Stereotypically speaking. I think of FARC and Los Pepes etc. Labs in the jungle. Assassins with UZIs on the back of motorcycles in a hillside urban slum. I don't think of Shakira.

That's a very realistic part of Colombia.

El Andullero
2012-06-09, 00:58
No, because Haitians destructed anything that reminded them of slavery when they became independent.

The ones working on the construction projects here aren't in different conditions than those Colombian miners, to be honest. Heck, many of them actually live in the projects, as long as these are ongoing. I call these projects the plantations of bar and cement.

Maroon King
2012-06-09, 01:11
^Good point and it's a good 2 hear an insider perspective.

El Andullero
2012-06-09, 01:14
^Good point and it's a good 2 hear an insider perspective.

SDQ these days reminds me of "Miami Vice", that is, a lot of residential and commercial construction projects arising everywhere, from fortunes that wouldn't survive the most minimum scrutiny. Dirty money is displacing clean money at an accelerated pace.

Maroon King
2012-06-09, 01:15
SDQ these days reminds me of "Miami Vice", that is, a lot of residential and commercial construction projects arising everywhere, from fortunes that wouldn't survive the most minimum scrutiny. Dirty money is displacing clean money at an accelerated pace.

Do u rent or own in STO DOMINGO?

El Andullero
2012-06-09, 01:17
Do u rent or own in STO DOMINGO?

Own, thank the Maker, but it was bought when my Mom was still working at the bank (that is, in 1997). It would have been impossible for us to buy in the same zone nowadays, since we're practically in ground zero from whence these constructions are arising.

amerinese
2012-06-09, 01:20
So is the dirty money from government skimming or other sources? Are there any major international rackets in DR like drugs, human trafficking, etc. as a distribution center, or is it mostly involving only local demand?

I have been under the impression that the drug distribution business to the US via the Caribbean was pretty slow since NAFTA was enacted and we started supporting Coast Guard interdiction with AWACS etc. That's why Mexican cartels are so rich and powerful now.

El Andullero
2012-06-09, 01:21
So is the dirty money from government skimming or other sources? Are there any major international rackets in DR like drugs, human trafficking, etc. as a distribution center, or is it mostly involving only local demand?

I have been under the impression that the drug distribution business to the US via the Caribbean was pretty slow since NAFTA was enacted and we started supporting Coast Guard interdiction with AWACS etc. That's why Mexican cartels are so rich and powerful now.

All of the above :(:sadcry:. The main triads here are controlled by Mexicans, Colombians, and even a few Russians, with Dominicans, Puerto Ricans and even Haitians serving as hitmen.

Maroon King
2012-06-09, 01:24
Yeah there's Colombians in Haiti and Jamaica too doing no good.

El Andullero
2012-06-09, 01:29
Yeah there's Colombians in Haiti and Jamaica too doing no good.

We're practically reliving the "Pirates of the Caribbean" scenario, although in a more sophisticated (and deadlier) setting.

Spark
2012-06-09, 01:48
We're practically reliving the "Pirates of the Caribbean" scenario, although in a more sophisticated (and deadlier) setting.

Wow...sounds like so much excitement until I got to the "deadlier" part. *imagines bullets flying overhead* That's exciting in a totally different way. :o

El Andullero
2012-06-09, 01:52
Wow...sounds like so much excitement until I got to the "deadlier" part. *imagines bullets flying overhead* That's exciting in a totally different way. :o

Adrenaline shouldn't have to be bought at so steep a price, I agree. I miss the old bucolic, village days. It certainly beats living on an urban nightmare any day. :(

Spark
2012-06-09, 01:58
Adrenaline shouldn't have to be bought at so steep a price, I agree. I miss the old bucolic, village days. It certainly beats living on an urban nightmare any day. :(

We are both country bumpkins. :lol: Apparently, one of my great aunts (my great-grandmother's frisky sister) caused such a ruckus in the countryside as a girl (she severely whipped a white boy with a switch, leaving screaming wounds on his back, after an incident over a dog he named Nigger), that they sent my great-grandmother to go fetch their mother ten miles down the road to come and tend to the boy's injuries with a polstice she developed from an old indigenous remedy. :lol: The boy's back was healed within two weeks and he had no scars left! As a result, that white family and my family were friends from then on, even though this was in the middle of North Carolina during Jim Crow and race relations were rocky. You can only tell of such stories in the country.

El Andullero
2012-06-09, 02:01
We are both country bumpkins. :lol: Apparently, one of my great aunts (my great-grandmother's frisky sister) caused such a ruckus in the countryside as a girl (she severely whipped a white boy with a switch, leaving screaming wounds on his back, after an incident over a dog he named Nigger), that they sent my great-grandmother to go fetch their mother ten miles down the road to come and tend to the boy's injuries with a polstice she developed from an old indigenous remedy. :lol: The boy's back was healed within two weeks and he had no scars left! As a result, that white family and my family were friends from then on, even though this was in the middle of North Carolina during Jim Crow and race relations were rocky. You can only tell of such stories in the country.

What makes it all the harder is the damn noise. I will never be able to get used to it, in spite of living the better part of 15 years up to the neck on it. It makes centering oneself so difficult.

Spark
2012-06-09, 02:04
What makes it all the harder is the damn noise. I will never be able to get used to it, in spite of living the better part of 15 years up to the neck on it. It makes centering oneself so difficult.

I know what you mean. Outside, I hear some of the most ear-cringing, graphic slang. And there is always someone hollering, "PAAAPPPPIIII!!!" drunk on Friday nights. :lol:

vanillagorilla
2012-06-09, 03:34
Stereotypically speaking. I think of FARC and Los Pepes etc. Labs in the jungle. Assassins with UZIs on the back of motorcycles in a hillside urban slum. I don't think of Shakira.

When I think of Colombia, I think of FARC, drugs and really hot women (Shakira and Sofia Vergara from Modern Family.)