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ludim
2010-03-28, 21:39
I just read and found some information on on how possible the British being linked to Bretons from Brittany like for example when they came I think to Great Britain just after the Norman conquest and another thing that the Stewart/Stuarts(especially for Scotland) are directally descended from Brittany. So could be true that they are actually descend for Bretons.

Links
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Stuart
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breton_people

OldPretan
2010-03-29, 12:55
I just read and found some information on on how possible the British being linked to Bretons from Brittany like for example when they came I think to Great Britain just after the Norman conquest and another thing that the Stewart/Stuarts(especially for Scotland) are directally descended from Brittany. So could be true that they are actually descend for Bretons.

Links
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Stuart
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breton_people

The second link clearly states that Brittany (Little Britain) takes its name from Britons who settled there from Great Britain.

The Bretons are an ethnic group located in the region of Brittany in France. They trace much of their heritage to groups of Brythonic speakers who settled the area from south western Great Britain in two waves from the 4th to 6th centuries
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In the late 4th century large numbers of British auxiliary troops in the Roman army may have been stationed in Armorica. The 9th century Historia Brittonum states that the emperor Magnus Maximus, who withdrew Roman forces from Britain, settled his troops in the province. Nennius and Gildas mention a second wave of Britons settling in Armorica in the following century to escape the invading Anglo-Saxons and Scoti. Modern archaeology also supports a two-wave migration.[4]

It is generally accepted that the Brythonic speakers who arrived gave the region its current name as well as the Breton language, Brezhoneg, a sister language to Welsh and Cornish.
.....
In the Early Middle Ages, Brittany was divided into three kingdoms Domnonia, Cornouaille (Kernev), and Bro Waroc'h (Brorec) which eventually were incorporated into the Duchy of Brittany. The first two kingdoms seem to derive their names from the homelands of the migrating tribes in Britain, Cornwall (Kernow) and Dumnonia.

The Bretons have always maintained links with the motherland and differentiated themselves from the Franks.

ludim
2010-03-29, 22:36
No wonder the Bretons wanted to be considered different, they feel closer to the British.

ludim
2010-04-07, 19:24
Here is a genetic study sample of a regional sampling of five French groups and a possible connection between the French, British and Irish:


According to classical markers, France has been reported to be regionally heterogeneous. Here, we propose to test the homogeneity of the French mitochondrial gene pool by analysing D-Loop and coding regions polymorphisms in 210 individuals stemming from five regions. The data set obtained was also used to test the ability of mitochondrial DNA to detect well historically established admixtures (admixtures between British/Irish people and native Breton people in our case). For these purposes, the sampling procedure was subject to special care, concerning the individuals' geographical origin and maternal pedigree. The mtDNA analysis revealed some regional specificities in haplogroup distribution, which is discussed in terms of successive settlements of France. Statistical analyses were conducted to investigate mtDNA diversity and structure within and between British, Irish and French groups. They tended to show affinities between Morbihan region and Britain plus Ireland. Furthermore, genetic evidences were in line with the fact that Morbihan region results from an admixture event, agreeing with historical evidences of successive migrations from Britain and Ireland into Brittany. These results also tended to outline the fact that two geographically very adjacent samples (Morbihan and Finistère), sharing a cultural and linguistic area, can present a distinct genetic pattern. Although mtDNA analyses were able to identify a historically reported admixture event, we point out here the high influence of the sampling procedure and representativeness over the migrations hypothesis. We also underline the importance of regional sampling for studies on the spread and/or origin of specific European haplogroups (here U5a1a and U8).

Click here:
http://www.nature.com/ejhg/journal/v12/n4/abs/5201145a.html