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ahniyvwiya
2010-08-10, 20:22
So this is kind of old news, but I was reading about the current Pope guy [he wears weird hats eh?] and stumbled upon an article concerning his visit to Turkey, and especially his prayer toward Mecca at the Blue Mosque. It was a silent prayer, but he removed his shoes and turned in the direction of Mecca.
I understand that this was mainly a gesture of solidarity and a mea culpa for his lecture comments regarding Islam and its spread "by the sword." I just find it very interesting that a Pope could do such a thing, that it didn't violate any Catholic regulation--I know there are at least some Catholics on this forum and perhaps others who know a lot more about the subject than I do, I was wondering what your input might be?

First read this article: http://ibnlive.in.com/news/pope-prays-toward-mecca-earns-praise/27485-2.html?from=prestory

Then read this one and lol: http://www.traditioninaction.org/religious/m012rpRatzingerInMosque.html


First, he went to the mosque.

Second, before entering it, he removed his shoes.

Third, he humbly received “instruction” from Mustafa Cagriche on the basics of Muslim prayer.

Fourth, he meekly followed the Muslim’s command to turn toward “the Kiblah” – the direction of Mecca. Then the prayer began.

Fifth, he did not even make the Sign of the Cross or give any external sign that he was making a Catholic prayer. On the contrary, he imitated the mufti, crossing his hands on his stomach in a classical Muslim prayer attitude known as “the posture of tranquility.” Eyes closed, they prayed together for several minutes.

Therefore, every external sign of a tacit apostasy from Catholic prayer was present, not any sublime personal attitude. This was the indisputable message Benedict XVI wanted to send to Muslims and Catholics.

See, while the second article was written by adisapproving reactionary traditionalist, I still prefer it because I prefer to believe that the Pope is open-minded enough to understand the concept of One God, Many Interpretations--even though I know that the Catholic Church doesn't play that. The second article suggests that this was a major thing, I'll take that part and dismiss the negative judgment as that of a backwards fundamentalist.
I dislike the fusion of bureaucracy and spirituality, in fact I hate it, so you can imagine what my opinion on both Islam and Catholicism must be. Still, if this was a step in the direction of human beings considering the concept of a shared "god" then good on it, but it seems more likely that religious outlets will digest this in variously bitter, self-serving, and cynical ways, leaving only the non-religious and/or open-minded-while-religious among us to appreciate the finer points of the gesture.
So that's my take, what's yours?

alfieb
2010-08-10, 22:03
So that's my take, what's yours?
Since JPII the RC Church has been trying to build bridges to other faiths. It hasn't even been exclusive to Abrahamic faiths that (in our view) incorrectly worship the right God. Rather, he and his predecessor have attempted to have friendly dialogue with Buddhist leaders as well as other Dharmic faiths.

It is a move towards what Christianity was supposed to be. Christians were not intended to be violent or hateful of other faiths. They were instead supposed to live their lives like Christ did. While Muhammad himself was a violent, worldly man who succumbed to his impulses, Christ believed in turning the other cheek and loving your neighbor, despite your differences.

Papa Benedetto is only doing what he is supposed to do as a Servant of Christ. It's a shame that for so long religious leaders did not.

Othuroyo
2010-08-10, 22:20
I agree that it was a nice act by the Pope however I don't think he should have prayed in a muslim way. You can talk how much you want about respecting their faith though they should be too respecting him if he decided not to pray the way they do.

Think of all the Christian people Islam converted with force. Praying to Mecca seems to me disrespectful to them and I don't see how it would not be Christian of him if he decided not to pray like them.

ethioboy
2010-08-10, 22:22
So this is kind of old news, but I was reading about the current Pope guy [he wears weird hats eh?] and stumbled upon an article concerning his visit to Turkey, and especially his prayer toward Mecca at the Blue Mosque. It was a silent prayer, but he removed his shoes and turned in the direction of Mecca.
I understand that this was mainly a gesture of solidarity and a mea culpa for his lecture comments regarding Islam and its spread "by the sword." I just find it very interesting that a Pope could do such a thing, that it didn't violate any Catholic regulation--I know there are at least some Catholics on this forum and perhaps others who know a lot more about the subject than I do, I was wondering what your input might be?

First read this article: http://ibnlive.in.com/news/pope-prays-toward-mecca-earns-praise/27485-2.html?from=prestory

Then read this one and lol: http://www.traditioninaction.org/religious/m012rpRatzingerInMosque.html



See, while the second article was written by adisapproving reactionary traditionalist, I still prefer it because I prefer to believe that the Pope is open-minded enough to understand the concept of One God, Many Interpretations--even though I know that the Catholic Church doesn't play that. The second article suggests that this was a major thing, I'll take that part and dismiss the negative judgment as that of a backwards fundamentalist.
I dislike the fusion of bureaucracy and spirituality, in fact I hate it, so you can imagine what my opinion on both Islam and Catholicism must be. Still, if this was a step in the direction of human beings considering the concept of a shared "god" then good on it, but it seems more likely that religious outlets will digest this in variously bitter, self-serving, and cynical ways, leaving only the non-religious and/or open-minded-while-religious among us to appreciate the finer points of the gesture.
So that's my take, what's yours?

There was no problem in this gesture. I am a catholic. Although I find it wierd why he did it there is no problem with it. They follow the SAME God As us. Only difference is the fact that we believe in Jesus Christ as the Son of God and thus we believe in a trinity while they believe Jesus was a prophet like Abraham and Mohammed. Finally they believe Mohammed as the final prophet.

alfieb
2010-08-10, 23:09
There was no problem in this gesture. I am a catholic. Although I find it wierd why he did it there is no problem with it. They follow the SAME God As us. Only difference is the fact that we believe in Jesus Christ as the Son of God and thus we believe in a trinity while they believe Jesus was a prophet like Abraham and Mohammed. Finally they believe Mohammed as the final prophet.

While true, they also believe that the Bible is corrupt and full of mistruths and that, for example, Jesus never died on the cross, rather that it was an illusion and that he had a lookalike impostor die instead. They believe in the same Prophets as the Jews and the Christians, but they've changed the story significantly.

They believe that Jesus will come back in the end times (like Christians do), except that rather than peacefully take his followers to Heaven, the Muslims believe that Jesus will behead the Antichrist. Because they're apparently lost to the fact that Jesus was peaceful, rather than violent like Muhammad.