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Thread: 56 Ethnic Groups of China1686 days old

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    Cool 56 Ethnic Groups of China

    I found these high resolution images of the ethnic groups of China. These are pretty neat since I didn't know that China was ethnically diverse.

    Anyway, here are the national minorities of China

    Mongols

    Ethnic Mongols in China (Chinese: 蒙古族 Mnggǔz) are citizens of the People's Republic of China who are ethnic Mongols. They form one of the 55 ethnic minorities officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. There are approximately 5.8 million ethnic Mongols living in China. Most of them live in Inner Mongolia, Northeast China, Xinjiang, etc. The Mongol population in China is over twice that of the independent nation of Mongolia.


    Hui

    The Hui people (Chinese: 回族; pinyin: Huz, Xiao'erjing: حُوِ ذَو ) are a Chinese ethnic group, typically distinguished by their practice of Islam.

    In modern People's Republic of China, the term "Hui people" refers to one of the officially recognized 56 ethnic groups into which Chinese citizens are classified. Under this definition, the Hui people are defined to include all historically Muslim communities in People's Republic of China that are not included into China's other ethnic groups.[2] Since China's Muslims speaking various Turkic, Mongolian, or Iranian languages are all included into those other groups (e.g., Uyghurs, Tajiks, or Dongxiang), the "officially recognized" Hui ethnic group consists predominantly of Chinese speakers.[3] In fact, the "Hui nationality" is unique among China's officially recognized ethnic minorities in that it does not have any particular non-Chinese language associated with it.[4]

    Nonetheless, included among the Hui in Chinese census statistics (and not officially recognized as separate ethnic groups) are also members of a few small non-Chinese speaking communities. Among them are several thousand Utsuls in southern Hainan province, who speak an Austronesian language (Tsat) related to that of the Cham Muslim minority of Vietnam, and who are said to be descended from Chams who migrated to Hainan.[5] A small Muslim minority among Yunnan's Bai people are classified as Hui as well (even if they are Bai speakers), [6] as are some groups of Tibetan Muslims.[7]

    The Hui people are concentrated in Northwestern China (Ningxia, Gansu, Qinghai, Xinjiang), but communities exist across the country, e.g. Beijing, Inner Mongolia, Hebei, Yunnan, etc.

    Most Hui are similar in culture to Han Chinese with the exception that they practice Islam, and have some distinctive cultural characteristics as a result. For example, as Muslims, they follow Islamic dietary laws and reject the consumption of pork, the most common meat consumed in Chinese culture,[8] and have also given rise to their variation of Chinese cuisine, Chinese Islamic cuisine and Muslim Chinese martial arts. Their mode of dress also differs primarily in that men wear white caps and women wear headscarves or (occasionally) veils, as is the case in most Islamic cultures.

    The Hui people are mixed blood. Their ancestors include Central Asian, Persian, Han Chinese, and Mongols. In ancient China, e.g. Tang and Yuan Dynasty, lots of people from Central Asian and Persia came to trade or pursue political careers. In the following nearly one thousand years, they gradually mixed with Mongols and Han Chinese, and the Hui people were formed. Because the Hui people have lived in China for so many years, they haven't retained Arabic and Central Asian languages, instead becoming Chinese speakers.

    Apart from some minor characteristics, the majority of Hui people look much like Han Chinese, especially in eastern China.


    Tibetan

    The Tibetan people are indigenous to Tibet and surrounding areas stretching from Central Asia in the North and West to Myanmar and China Proper in the East and India, Nepal and Bhutan to the south. Numbering 5.4 million, they are the 10th largest of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China.


    Uyghur

    The Uyghur (Uyghur: ئۇيغۇر‎, Uyghur; simplified Chinese: 维吾尔; traditional Chinese: 維吾爾; pinyin: Wiw'ěr; IPA: [ʔʊjˈʁʊː][2]) are a Turkic ethnic group living in Eastern and Central Asia. Today Uyghurs live primarily in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in the People's Republic of China.

    Large diasporic communities of Uyghurs exist in the Central Asian countries of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, and Uzbekistan. Smaller communities are found in Mongolia, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Turkey, Russia and Taoyuan County of Hunan province in south-central Mainland China.[3] Uyghur neighborhoods can be found in major cities like Beijing, Shanghai, Sydney, Washington D.C, Munich, Tokyo, Toronto, Istanbul and Adelaide.


    Miao

    The Miao (Chinese: 苗; pinyin: Mio; Vietnamese: Mo or H'Mng; Thai: แม้ว (Maew) or ม้ง (Mong); Burmese: mun lu-myo) are a linguistically and culturally related group of people recognized by the government of the People's Republic of China as one of the 55 official minority groups. Miao is a Chinese term and does not reflect the self-designations of the component sub-groups, which include (with some variant spellings) Hmong/Mong, Hmu, A Hmao, and Kho (Qho) Xiong. The Miao live primarily in southern China, in the provinces of Guizhou, Hunan, Yunnan, Sichuan, Guangxi, Hainan, Guangdong, and Hubei. Some members of the Miao sub-groups, most notably Hmong/Mong people, have migrated out of China into Southeast Asia (northern Vietnam, Laos, Myanmar (Burma) and Thailand). Following the communist takeover of Laos in 1975, a large group of Hmong/Mong refugees resettled in several Western nations (United States, France, Australia, and elsewhere.


    Yi

    The Yi people (own name in the Liangshan dialect: ꆈꌠ, official transcription: Nuosu (諾蘇), IPA: [nɔ̄sū]; Chinese: 彝族; pinyin: Yz; the older name "Lolo" or "Luǒluǒ" (倮倮) is now considered derogatory in China, though used officially in Vietnam as L L and in Thailand as Lolo [โล-โล]) are a modern ethnic group in China, Vietnam, and Thailand. Numbering 8 million, they are the seventh largest of the 55 ethnic minority groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. They live primarily in rural areas of Sichuan, Yunnan, Guizhou, and Guangxi, usually in mountainous regions. There are 3,300 L L people (1999 statistics) living in H Giang, Cao Bằng, and Lo Cai provinces in northeastern Vietnam.

    The Yi speak Yi, a Tibeto-Burman language closely related to Burmese, which is written in the Yi script.


    I'll post more later.

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    Default More ethnics

    Zhuang

    The Zhuang (in the Zhuang language: Bouчcueŋь/Bouxcuengh (pronoucing bou shung); simplified Chinese: 壮族; traditional Chinese: 壯族; pinyin: Zhungz) are an ethnic group of people who mostly live in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in southern China. Some also live in the Yunnan, Guangdong, Guizhou and Hunan provinces. They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. Their population, estimated at 18 million people, puts them second only to the Han Chinese and makes the Zhuang the largest minority in China.


    Buyei

    The Buyei (also spelled Puyi, Bouyei and Buyi; self called: Buxqyaix, IPA: [puʔjai], or "Puzhong", "Burao", "Puman"; Chinese: 布依族; Pinyin: Byīz; Vietnamese: người Bố Y) are an ethnic group living in southern mainland China. Numbering 2.5 million, they are the 11th largest of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. Some Buyei also live in Vietnam, where they are one of that nation's 54 officially recognized ethnic groups. Despite the Chinese considering them a separate group, they consider themselves Zhuang (Tai peoples).

    The Buyei live in semi-tropical, high-altitude forests of Guizhou province, as well as in Yunnan and Sichuan provinces, and speak a Tai language. Traditionally they practice animism, although some have now converted to Christianity.


    Korean

    The population of Koreans in China include millions of descendants of Korean immigrants with citizenship of the People's Republic of China, as well as smaller groups of South and North Korean expatriates, with a total of roughly 2.3 million people as of 2009[update].[1]

    Chaoxianzu/Joseonjok (Simplified Chinese: 朝鲜族, Korean: 조선족), also referred to as Chinese people of Korean descent (Korean: 조선계 중국인, Hanja: 朝鮮系中國人), form one of the 56 ethnicities officially recognized by the Chinese government. Their total population was estimated at 1,923,842 as of 2005[update].[2] Most of them live in Northeast China, especially in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture, which had 854,000 ethnic Koreans living there as of 2000.


    Manchu

    The Manchu people (Manchu: Manju; simplified Chinese: 满族; traditional Chinese: 滿族; pinyin: Mǎnz, Mongolian: Манж, Russian: Маньчжуры) are a Tungusic people who originated in Manchuria (today's northeastern China). During their rise in the seventeenth century, with the help of Ming rebels (such as general Wu Sangui), they conquered the Ming Dynasty and founded the Qing Dynasty, which ruled China until the Xinhai Revolution of 1911, which established a republican government in its place.

    The Manchu ethnicity has largely been assimilated with the Han Chinese. The Manchu language is almost extinct, now spoken only among a small number of elderly people in remote rural areas of northeastern China and a few scholars; there are around ten thousand speakers of Sibe (Xibo), a Manchu dialect spoken in the Ili region of Xinjiang. In recent years, however, there has been a resurgence of interest in Manchu culture among both ethnic Manchus and Han. The number of Chinese today with some Manchu ancestry is quite large,[4] and the adoption of favorable policies towards ethnic minorities (such as preferential university admission, government employment opportunities and exemption from the one child policy) has encouraged some people with mixed Han and Manchu ancestry to re-identify themselves as Manchu.


    Dong

    The Dong (Chinese: 侗族; pinyin: Dngz; own name: Gaeml, in the IPA: [kɐm], also referred to as Kam) people are an ethnic group. They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China, and are famed for their carpentry skills and unique architecture, in particular a form of covered bridge known as the "wind and rain bridge" (Chinese: 风雨桥). Many of the people are also farmers. Their cuisine prominently features pickled foods and sticky rice.

    They live mostly in Guizhou, Hunan, and Guangxi provinces of China.


    Yao

    The Yao nationality (Traditional Chinese: 瑤族, Simplified Chinese: 瑶族, Pinyin: Yo z; Vietnamese: người Dao) is a government classification for various minorities in China. They form one of the 55 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China, where they reside in the mountainous terrain of the southwest and south. They also form one of the 54 ethnic groups officially recognized by Vietnam. In the last census, they numbered 2,637,421 in China, and roughly 470,000 in Vietnam.


    Bai

    The Bai (Chinese: 白族; pinyin: Biz; endonym pronounced [pɛ̀tsī]) are one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. They numbered 1,858,063 as of 2000.

    The Bai People hold the white colour in high esteem and call themselves "Baizi", "Baini" or "Baihuo", which means white people. In 1956, of their own will they were named the Bai Nationality by Chinese Authorities.


    Tujia

    The Tujia (土家族; pinyin: Tǔjiāz; endonym: Bizika 毕兹卡), with a total population of over 8 million, is the 6th largest ethnic minority in People's Republic of China. They live in Wuling Mountains, straddling the common borders of Hunan, Hubei and Guizhou Provinces, and Chongqing Municipality.

    Their endonym Bizika means "native dwellers" in the Tujia language.


    Hani

    The Hani people (Hani: Haqniq; Chinese: 哈尼族; pinyin: Hānz; Vietnamese: Người H Nh) are an ethnic group. They form one of the 56 nationalities officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. They also form one of the 54 officially recognized ethnic groups of Vietnam. There are 12,500 Hanis living in the Lai Chau and Lao Cai provinces of Vietnam.

    Over ninety percent of the Hani live in the southwestern Chinese province of Yunnan, scattered across the Ailao Mountains between the Mekong River and the Red River (Yuanjiang).

    The origins of the Hani are not precisely known, though their ancestors, the ancient Qiang tribe, are believed to have migrated southward from the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau prior to the third century AD.

    The Hani oral traditions state that they are descended from the Yi people, and that they split off as a separate tribe fifty generations ago. One of their oral traditions is the recital of the names of Hani ancestors from the first Hani family down to oneself.


    Kazakh

    Kazakhs, called Hāsk Z in Chinese (哈萨克族; literally "Kazakh people" or "Kazakh tribe") are among 56 minority groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. In China there is one Kazakh autonomous prefecture, the Ili Kazakh Autonomous Prefecture in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, three Kazakh autonomous counties, Aksai Kazakh Autonomous County in Gansu, Barkol Kazakh Autonomous County and Mori Kazakh Autonomous County in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. Many Kazakhs in China are not fluent in Standard Mandarin, instead speaking the Kazakh language. Since the early 21st century, Mamuer Rayeskan, a young Kazakh musician from Qitai, Xinjiang now living in Beijing, has achieved some renown for his reworking of Kazakh folk songs with his group IZ, with which he sings and plays acoustic guitar, dombra, and jaw harp.

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    great job man i enjoy this thread

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...roups_in_China

    I was surprised to see Russians on that list.

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    That white furry headwear worn by the Kazak men, what is it called? I could use one of those in the current freezing cold weather.

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    I think it's called a malakai or something. I know the Kazakhs have 3 kinds of headgear.

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    Dai

    The Dai peoples of China (Tai L: tai51 lɯ11 Chinese: 傣族; pinyin: Dǎiz) is the officially recognized name of several ethnic groups living in the Xishuangbanna Dai Autonomous Prefecture and the Dehong Dai and Jingpo Autonomous Prefecture (both in southern Yunnan, China), but by extension can apply to groups in Laos, Vietnam, Thailand, and Burma when Dai is used to mean specifically Tai Lue, Chinese Shan or even Tai in general. For other names, see table below.


    Li

    The Li (黎; pinyin: L) or Hlai are a minority Chinese ethnic group, sometimes colloquially known as "Sai" or "Say." They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. 94% of the Li live off the southern coast of mainland China on Hainan, where they are the largest minority ethnic group. As well as Hainan, the Li people are also found in some islands in the South China Sea area that are considered Filipino territory. Native islanders of the Luzon Sea, such as Filipino people, are included under the "Li" ethnic group in China.

    During the Sui Dynasty they were known by the name Liliao, and presently they refer to themselves as the Hlai people. The Li suffered heavily under the Japanese occupation, and they are held in high esteem by the Beijing government because they fought on the side of the CPC against Chinese Nationalist rule during the Chinese Civil War.[1]

    The Li people can generally understand or speak Mandarin. Because many Li in Hainan relocate to Cantonese-speaking areas in southern mainland China near Hainan (such as Guangzhou and HK), it is common for Li people to learn and speak Cantonese.


    Lisu

    The Lisu people (Chinese: 傈僳族: Ls z; Thai: ลีสู่) are a Tibeto-Burman ethnic group who inhabit the mountainous regions of Burma (Myanmar), Southwest China, Thailand, and the Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh.

    About 730,000 live in Lijiang, Baoshan, Nujiang, Diqing and Dehong prefectures in Yunnan Province, China. The Lisu form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. In Burma, the Lisu are known as one of the seven Kachin minority groups and an estimated population of 350,000 Lisu live in Kachin and Shan State in Burma. Approximately 55,000 live in Thailand, where they are one of the six main hill tribes. They mainly inhabit the remote country areas.


    Va

    The Va nationality (Burmese: ဝလူမျိုး; IPA: [wa̰ lmjʊ];Chinese: 佤族; pinyin: Wǎz) lives mainly in Northern Myanmar, in the northern part ofShan and eastern Kachin States, near and along the border with China. Their defacto capital is Bangkang in the unofficial Wa State in North Eastern Shan state. The majority of the Va live in Myanmar. They were known as the 'Wild Wa' by British administrators.

    In China, they live in compact communities in the Ximeng (in Va: Mēng Ka or Si Moung), Cangyuan, Menglian (Gaeng Līam), Gengma (Gaeng Mīex or Gaeng Māx), Lincang (Mēng Lām), Shuangjiang (Si Nblāeng or Mēng Mēng), Zhenkang, and Yongde counties in southwestern Yunnan Province of China. Their population in China is estimated at around 400,000.

    The Va language belongs to Mon-Khmer group of the Austroasiatic family. A written language was created for the Va people in 1957.

    The Va are one of the 136 officially recognized ethnic groups in Myanmar (formerly Burma). The Va are also one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognised by the People's Republic of China.

    The Wa in Myanmar form the United Wa State Army, a former communist rebel group that is in a fragile cease-fire agreement with the Burmese military government. They have been accused by Western governments of involvement in drug trafficking.


    She

    The She (畲) people (She Hakka: [sa]; Cantonese: [sɛ1]; Fuzhou dialect: [sia55]) are an ethnic group. They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China.

    They are the largest minority in Fujian province. They are also present in the provinces of Zhejiang, Anhui, Jiangxi and Guangdong.


    Taiwanese Minorities



    Lahu

    The Lahu people (Chinese: 拉祜族; pinyin: Lāhz; own names: Ladhulsi or Kawzhawd; Vietnamese: La Hủ) are an ethnic group of Southeast Asia and China.

    They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China, where about 450,000 live in Yunnan province. An estimated 150,000 live in Burma. In Thailand Lahu are one of the six main hill tribes, and their population is estimated at around 100,000. The Tai often refer to them by the exonym "Mussur", meaning hunter. About 10,000 live in Laos. They are one of 54 ethnic groups in Vietnam, where about 1,500 of them live in Lai Chau province.[1]

    The Lahu divide themselves into a number of subgroups, such as the Lahu Na (Black Lahu), Lahu Nyi (Red Lahu), Lahu Hpu (White Lahu), Lahu Shi (Yellow Lahu) and the Lahu Shehleh. Where a subgroup name refers to a color, that is the traditional color of their dress. These groups do not function as tribes or clans - there are no kin groups above that of the family. Lahu trace descent bilaterally, and typically practice matrilocal residence.

    Their language is in the Loloish branch of the Lolo-Burmese subgroup of the Tibeto-Burman family (itself a member of the Sino-Tibetan language family). Like most of its relatives, it is a heavily isolating language with Subject Object Verb word order and a set of numeral classifiers. There are seven tones, and consonants cannot close syllables. The language spoken by the Lahu Shi is notably divergent from that spoken by the other groups. In Thailand, Lahu Na often serves as a lingua franca among the various hill tribes. Written Lahu uses the Latin alphabet. Among Christian villages, the language has been enriched by loanwords from English, Latin and Greek via Bible translation, plus neologisms in the areas of hygiene, music and education.[1]

    The traditional Lahu religion is polytheistic. Buddhism was introduced in the late 1600s and became widespread. Many Lahu in China are adepts of Christianity. Christianity became established in Burma in the 1800s and has been spreading since.

    The Lahu population is very little. They can be found in the USA too. Minnesota, California, and North Carolina is where you will most likely find Lahu people.


    Sui

    The Sui people (Chinese: 水族; pinyin: Shuǐz) are an ethnic group living in the Guangxi, Guizhou, and Yunnan areas of southwestern China. They are counted as one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China.


    Dongxiang

    The Dongxiang people (autonym: Sarta or Santa (撒尔塔); simplified Chinese: 东乡族; traditional Chinese: 東鄉族; pinyin: Dōngxiāngz) are one of 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. Most of the Dongxiang live in the Linxia Hui Autonomous Prefecture and surrounding areas of Gansu Province in northwestern China, while others groupings can also be found in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, Qinghai Province, and Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region. According to the 2000 census, their population numbers 513,805. The Dongxiang are Chinese Muslims of Mongol descent mixed with various ethnic groups in the region.


    Naxi

    The Nakhi (simplified Chinese: 纳西族; traditional Chinese: 納西族; pinyin: Nxī z; endonym: nakhi) are an ethnic group inhabiting the foothills of the Himalayas in the northwestern part of Yunnan Province, as well as the southwestern part of Sichuan Province in China.

    The Nakhi are thought to have come originally from Tibet and, until recently, maintained overland trading links with Lhasa and India. They were brought to the attention of the world by two men: the American botanist Joseph Rock and the Russian Taoist doctor Peter Goullart, both of whom lived in Lijiang and travelled throughout the area during the early 20th century. Peter Goullart's book Forgotten Kingdom describes the life and beliefs of the Nakhi and neighbouring peoples, while Joseph Rock's legacy includes diaries, maps, and photographs of the region.

    The Nakhi form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. The official Chinese government classification classes the Mosuo as part of the Nakhi people. However, despite similar origins and very striking resemblances from a linguistic point of view, the two groups are now culturally distinct, the Nakhi more influenced by Han Chinese culture, the Mosuo more influenced by Tibetan culture.


    Jingpo

    The Jingpho people (Burmese: ကခ္ယင္*လူမ္ယုိး; MLCTS: ka. hkyang lu. myui, Jingpo (simplified Chinese: 景颇族; traditional Chinese: 景頗族; pinyin: Jǐngpō z) or Singpho; endonyms: Jinghpaw, Tsaiva, Lechi) are an ethnic group who largely inhabit northern Burma (Kachin State). They also form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China, where they numbered 132,143 people in the 2000 census. There is a closely related people in India called Singpho.


    Kirgiz

    The Kyrgyz form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. There are more than 145,000 Kyrgyz in China. They are known in China as Kēěrkzī z (simplified Chinese: 柯尔克孜族; traditional Chinese: 柯爾克孜族).

    They are found mainly in the Kizilsu Kirghiz Autonomous Prefecture in the southwestern part of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, with a smaller remainder found in the neighboring Wushi (Uqturpan), Aksu, Shache (Yarkand), Yingisar, Taxkorgan and Pishan (Guma), and in Tekes, Zhaosu (Monggolkure), Emin (Dorbiljin), Bole (Bortala), Jinghev (Jing) and Gonliu in northern Xinjiang. Several hundred Kyrgyz whose forefathers emigrated to Northeast China more than 200 years ago now live in Wujiazi Village in Fuyu County, Heilongjiang Province.

    Certain segments of the Kyrgyz in China are followers of Tibetan Buddhism.


    ---------- Post added 2009-12-19 at 23:46 ----------

    Tu

    The "Monguor," as known in the West, and "Tu Zu," known in China are one of the fifty six officially recognized ethnic groups in the Peoples Republic of China. Their identity as Tu Zu was made by the Chinese Government in the first ethnic classificatory campaign carried out in 1953. Western scholars have long perceived the name to be derogatory, for it equated with the indigenous peoples, and used Monguor instead based on their self reference of Chaghan Monguor (or White Mongols,Mongolian: Цагаан Монгол).

    They totaled 241,198 in the 2000 Census and were primarily distributed in Qinghai and Gansu Provinces in the northwest. They speak an Altaic Mongolic language and practice sedentary agriculture supplemented by minimal animal husbandry. Their culture and social organizations are based on Confucianism, and their religion is a harmonious blend of the Yellow Sect (Tibetan) Buddhism, Taoism, and Shamanism


    Daur

    The Daur people (simplified Chinese: 达斡尔族; traditional Chinese: 達斡爾族; pinyin: Dw'ěr z; the former name "Dahur" is considered derogatory[citation needed]) are an Mongolian sub-ethnic group. They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized in the People's Republic of China. They numbered 132,394 according to the latest census (2000), and most of them live in the Morin Dawa Daur Autonomous Banner (Ml Dwǎ Dw'ěrz Zzhq 莫力達瓦達斡爾族自治旗/莫力达瓦达斡尔族自治旗) in Hulun Buir, Inner Mongolia autonomous region of China. There are also some near Tacheng in Xinjiang, where their ancestors were moved during the Qing Dynasty.


    Mulam

    The Mulao (Chinese: 仫佬族; pinyin: Mlǎoz; own name: Mulam) people are an ethnic group. They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. In their name, Mulam, mu6 is a classifier for human beings and lam1 (in some dialects it is kyam1) is another form of the name used by the Dong (Kam), to whom the Mulam people are ethnically related. A large portion of the Mulam in Guangxi live in Luocheng Mulao Autonomous County of Hechi, Guangxi.


    Qiang

    The Qiang people (Chinese: 羌族; pinyin: qiāng z) are an ethnic group of China. They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China, with a population of approximately 200,000, living mainly in northwestern part of Sichuan province. Nowadays, the Qiang are only a small segment of the Chinese population, but they are commonly believed to be an old, once strong and populous people whose history can be traced at least to the Shang Dynasty and whose offsprings are thought to include some portion of the modern Tibetans, some portion of the modern Han Chinese and many minority ethnic groups in Western China.


    Blang

    The Blang (布朗族 : Blǎng Z) (also spelled Bulong) people are an ethnic group. They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China.


    Salar

    Salar people (Salar: Salır, Turkic: Salar, Chinese: 撒拉族, Pinyin: Sālāz) are a Turkic people. Their language belongs to the Oghuz group, along with the Turkish language and Turkmen language.

    The Salars are one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China.

    The Salar people numbered 104,503 people in the last census of 2000. They live mostly in the Qinghai-Gansu border region, on both sides of the Yellow River, namely in Xunhua Salar Autonomous County (循化撒拉族自治縣) and Hualong Hui Autonomous County (化隆回族自治縣) of Qinghai and the adjacent Jishishan Bonan, Dongxiang and Salar Autonomous County of Gansu. There are also Salars in Xinjiang (in the Ili Kazakh Autonomous Prefecture 伊犁哈薩克自治州).

    Salar's ancestors were migrating Oghuz Turks who intermarried with the Han Chinese, Tibetans, and Hui. They are a patriarchal agricultural society and Muslims.


    Maonan

    The Maonan (self name: Anan meaning local people) people are an ethnic group. They are one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China.

    The Maonan ethnic minority has a population of 107,166, living in the northern part of the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, according to the Chinese government site.


    Gelao

    The Gelao people (also spelled Gelo) (own name: Klau, Chinese: 仡佬族 Gēlǎoz) are an ethnic group of China and Vietnam. They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China.

    They number approximately 438,200 and are mainly located in the western part of the Guizhou Province. Some live in Guangxi, Yunnan, and Sichuan. The main religion practiced is Taoism with a small but significant Buddhist minority.


    Xibe

    [quote]The Xibe or Sibo[2] ( Sibe; simplified Chinese: 锡伯; traditional Chinese: 錫伯; pinyin: Xīb) are a Tungusic ethnic group living mostly in northeast China and Xinjiang. They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China.[quote]



    Achang

    The Achang (Traditional/simplified Chinese: 阿昌族, Pinyin: Āchāng z), also known as the Ngac'ang (their own name) or Maingtha (Burmese name) are an ethnic group. They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. They also live in Burma.

    The Achang number 27,700, of whom 27,600 are from Yunnan province, especially Dehong Autonomous Prefecture. The Achang speak a Tibeto-Burman language called Achang, but there is no indigenous writing system to accompany it. Chinese characters are often used instead. Many Achang also speak the language of the Dai, mainly to make commercial transactions.[1]

    Speaking a distinct dialect, the Husa Achang (戶撒) living in Longchuan County (also in Dehong) consider themselves to be distinct and filed an unsuccessful application in the 1950s as a separate nationality. The Husa were more Sinicized than other Achang. For example, Confucian-styled ancestral memorial tablets are common in Husa homes. Most traditional Husa believe in a mixture of Theravada Buddhism (of the Hinayana school) and Taoism.


    Pumi

    The Pumi (also Primi) people (Chinese: 普米族; pinyin: Pǔmǐz, own name: /phʐẽmi/) are an ethnic group. They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China.

    Ethnically related to the Tibetans in the Muli Tibetan Autonomous County and Yanyuan in Sichuan,[1] the Pumi are recognized as an official minority nationality unique to Yunnan, with a population of 30,000. Communities are found notably in Pumi & Bai Autonomous County of Lanping, Yi Autonomous County of Ninglang, Lijiang Old Town, Naxi Autonomous County of Yulong, Lisu Autonomous County of Weixi and Yongsheng County, typically at elevations above 9,000 feet.


    Tajik

    Pamiri people in China, also referred to as Plateau Tajiks,[3] or Tajiks of China (Chinese: 塔吉克族; pinyin: Tǎjk Z), are one of the 56 nationalities officially recognized by the People's Republic of China.

    The term collectively refers to several East Iranian Pamiri ethnic groups, predominantly Sarikoli, Shugni and Wakhi speakers. They use Uyghur, Kyrgyz or Chinese to communicate with others.


    Nu

    The Nu people (Chinese: 怒族; pinyin: Nz) are one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. Their population of 27,000 is divided into the Northern, Central and Southern groups. Their homeland is a country of high mountains and deep ravines crossed by the Lancang, Dulong and Nujiang rivers, and this area is rich in natural minerals. The name "Nu" comes from the fact that they were living near the Nujiang river, and the name of their ethnic group derives from there. (Nujiang is also called Nu river or Chinese: 怒江; pinyin: N Jiāng or Salween River.)

    The Nu live mainly in Yunnan province. 90% of them are found in Gongshan, Fugong, Laping and Bijiang counties in Yunnan Province, along with Lisu, Drung, Tibetan, Nakhi, Bai and Han. There is also a sparse distribution of Nu in Weixi County in the Diqing Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture and Zayu County in Tibet Autonomous Region, particularly at the border between Yunnan and Tibet.

    The Nu speak a language in the Tibeto-Burman family of languages. They do not have a written language of their own, although the Chinese government have recently helped them to develop a script based on the Latin alphabet.


    ---------- Post added 2009-12-19 at 23:53 ----------

    Uzbek



    Russian

    Russians in China (simplified Chinese: 俄罗斯族; pinyin: lusī-z) form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. They are the descendants of Russians who settled in China, and hold Chinese rather than Russian citizenship.


    Evenki

    The Evenks (Ewenti or Eventi) (autonym: Эвэнкил Evenkil; Russian: Эвенки Evenki; Chinese: 鄂温克族 wēnk Z; formerly known as Tungus or Tunguz; Mongolian: Khamnigan Хамниган) are a Tungusic people of Northern Asia. In Russia, the Evenks are recognized as one of the Indigenous peoples of the Russian North, with a population of 35,527 (2002 Census). In China, the Evenki form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China, with a population of 30,505, as per 2000 Census. There is also a small Evenki group of Manchu-Tungus origin in Mongolia, referred to as Khamnigan. Evenki people is related to Altaic people of Eurasia.


    De'ang

    The De'ang (Chinese: 德昂族; pinyin: Dng Z; Thai: ปะหล่อง; also spelt Deang, Palaung and Benglong) people are an ethnic group livingi in China, Burma and Thailand. Their language is called Palaung or "Ta-ang".


    Bonan

    The Bonan (also Bao'an) people (保安族; pinyin: Bǎo'ān z; native [bɵːŋɑn]) are an ethnic group living in Gansu and Qinghai provinces in northwestern China. They are one of the "titular nationalities" of Gansu's Jishishan Bonan, Dongxiang and Salar Autonomous County, which is located south of the Yellow River, near Gansu's border with Qinghai.

    Numbering approximately 17,000 the Bonan are the 7th smallest of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China.


    Yugur

    The Yugurs (simplified Chinese: 裕固族; traditional Chinese: 裕固族; pinyin: Yg Z), or Yellow Uyghurs as they are traditionally known, are one of China's 56 officially recognized nationalities, consisting of 13,719 persons according to the 2000 census. The Yugur live primarily in Sunan Yugur Autonomous County in Gāns Province.

    About 4,600 of the Yugurs speak the Turkic Western Yugur language and about 2,800 the Mongolic Eastern Yugur language. The remaining Yugurs of the Autonomous County lost their respective Yugur language and speak Chinese. A very small number of the Yugur reportedly speak Tibetan. They use Chinese for intercommunication. Both Yugur languages are now unwritten, although vertical Uyghur script was in use in some Yugur communities till end of 18th century.

    The Turkic speaking Yugurs are considered to be the descendants of a group of Uyghurs who fled from Mongolia southwards to Gāns, after the collapse of the Uyghur Empire in 840 A.D., and soon established there a prosperous Ganzhou Kingdom (870-1036 A.D.) with capital near present Zhangye city on the foots of Nan Shan Mountains in the valley of the Ejin River (Black River). Population of this Kingdom, that was estimated at 300,000 in Song Dynasty chronicles, practised Manichaeism and Buddhism in numerous temples flourished throughout the country and had forcibly been incorporated into Tangut Kingdom, despite of fierce resistance, after bloody war of 1028-1036 A.D.( Mahmut Kashgari who lived at the time in Kashgar stated that "uyghur blood was pouring like a murmuring stream" during this war). The Mongolic speaking Yugurs are probably the descendants of one of the Mongolic speaking groups invading northern China during the Mongol conquests in the thirteenth century. The Yugurs were eventually incorporated in the Chinese Qing empire in 1696, during the reign of the second Manchu emperor Kangxi (1662-1723).

    The nationality's current, official name, Yugur, derived from the Yugur's autonym: the Turkic speaking Yugur designate themselves as Yogr or Sarg Yogr ((Yellow) Yugur), and the Mongolic speaking Yugur likewise use either Yogor or era Yogor ((Yellow) Yugur). Chinese historical documents have recorded these ethnonyms as Sālǐ Wiw'ěr or Xīlǎgǔ'ěr. During the Qing dynasty, the Yugur were also called 西喇古兒黃番(Xilaguer Hungbo (Western Lagur Yellow Bo). "Bo" is the classical Chinese term referring to Sino-Tibetian speaking ethnic groups. In order to distinguish both groups and their languages, Chinese linguists coined the terms Xīb Yg (Western Yugur) and Dōngb Yg (Eastern Yugur), based on their geographical distribution.

    The Turkic speaking Yugur mainly live in the western part of the County in Mnghuā District, in the Townships of Linhuā and Mnghǎi, and in Dh District, in the centre of the County. The Mongolic speaking Yugur mainly live in the County's eastern part, in Hungchng District, and in Dh and Kāngl Districts, in the centre of the County.

    The traditional religion of the Yugur is Tibetan Buddhism, which used to be practised alongside shamanism.

    The Yugur people are predominantly employed in animal husbandry.


    Jing

    Some areas of the southwestern People's Republic of China are inhabited by an indigenous population of ethnic Vietnamese people (or Kinh). They are referred to in Chinese as the Jīng (京族; pinyin: Jīngz), although Gin is the standard romanization in China.[1] They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. They speak Vietnamese, mixed with Cantonese dialect, and some Mandarin. They mainly live on 3 islands off the coast of Dongxing city, Fangchenggang, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. The population of the Vietnamese indigenous to China was just over 20,000 in 2000. This number does not include ethnic Vietnamese nationals from Vietnam studying or working in China.


    Tatar

    The Chinese Tatars (塔塔尔族 Tǎtǎěrz) form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China.

    Their ancestors are Volga Tatar tradesmen who settled mostly in Xinjiang.

    The number of Chinese Tatars is close to 5000 as of 2000, and they live mainly in the cities of Aletai, Changji, Yili, Urumchi, Tacheng and other places in Xinjiang.

    Chinese Tatars speak an archaic variant of the Tatar language, free from 20th-century loanwords and use Arabic variant of the Tatar alphabet, declined in USSR in 1930s.


    ---------- Post added 2009-12-20 at 00:02 ----------

    Derung

    The Derung (also spelt Drung or Dulong) people (simplified Chinese: 独龙族; traditional Chinese: 獨龍族; pinyin: Dlngz; endonym: [tɯɹɯŋ]) are an ethnic group. They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. Their population of 6,000 is found in the Nujiang Autonomous Prefecture of Yunnan province, in the Dulong valley. Another 600 can be found east of the Dulong valley, living in the mountains above the Nu Jiang (Salween River) near the village of Binzhongluo in northern Gongshan County.


    Oroqen

    The Oroqen people (simplified Chinese: 鄂伦春族; traditional Chinese: 鄂倫春族; pinyin: lnchūn z; Mongolian: Orčun; also spelt Orochen or Orochon) are an ethnic group in northern China. They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. According to the 2000 Census, 44.54% live in Inner Mongolia and 51.52% along the Heilongjiang River (Amur) in the province of Heilongjiang. The Oroqin Autonomous Banner is also located in Inner Mongolia.

    The Oroqens are mainly hunters and it is customary of them to use animal fur and skins for clothing. Many of them have given up hunting and adhered to laws that aimed to protect wildlife in the People's Republic of China. The government is said to have provided modern dwellings for those who have left behind the traditional way of life. The Oroqen are represented in the People's Congress by their own delegate and they are a recognized ethnic minority.


    Hezhen

    The Nani people (self name нани/"Nani" means natives;self name "Hezhen" means people of the Orient; Russian: нанайцы, tr. "nanaitsy"; Chinese: 赫哲族, tr. "Hzhz"; formerly also known as Golds and Samagir) are a Tungusic people of the Far East, who have traditionally lived along Heilongjiang (Amur), Songhuajiang (Sunggari) and Ussuri rivers on the Middle Amur Basin. The ancestors of the Nanais were the Jurchens of northernmost Manchuria.

    The Nanai/Hezhe language belongs to the Manchu-Tungusic branch of the Altai languages.


    Monba

    The Monpa (Tibetan: མོན་པ།) is a major tribe[1] of Arunachal Pradesh in northeastern India. Currently it is also one of the 56 officially recognized ethnic groups in China. Most Monpas live in the Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh, with a population of 50,000, centered in the districts of Tawang and West Kameng. Around 25,000 Monpas can be found in the district of Cuona in the Tibet Autonomous Region, where they are known as Menba (simplified Chinese: 门巴族; traditional Chinese: 門巴族; pinyin: Mnbāz). Of the 45,000 Monpas who live in Arunachal Pradesh, about 20,000 of them live in Tawang district, where they constitute about 97% of the district's population, and almost all of the remainder can be found in the West Kameng district, where they form about 77% of the district's population. A small number of them may be found in bordering areas of East Kameng[2] and Bhutan (2,500).

    They also share very close affinity with the Sharchops of Bhutan. Their language belongs to the Tibeto-Burman family, but it is significantly different from the Eastern Tibetan dialect. It is written with the Tibetan script.


    Lhoba

    Lhoba (Chinese: 珞巴) is a term of obscure (though probably Tibetan) origin which has come to apply to a diverse amalgamation of Tibeto-Burman tribespeople living in and around "Pemako" (a region in Southeastern Tibet)[4], including Mainling, Medog, Zay counties of Nyingchi Prefecture and Lhnz County of Shannan Prefecture. [5] The term is largely promulgated by the Chinese government, which officially recognises Lhoba as one of the 56 ethnic groups in China. Most people designated as "Lhoba" within modern-day Tibet Autonomous Region in China actually refer to themselves via a diverse set of autonyms (names recognized by a community itself), and do not traditionally self-identify as a single entity.[6][7] The two main tribal groups which fall under the designation "Lhoba" in Tibet are the Yidu (Idu [Mishmi]) and the Bo'gaer (Bokar [Adi]), who are found in far greater numbers inside Arunachal Pradesh, a state of modern-day India (claimed by China). Other groups identified by Chinese authorities as "Lhoba" include the Na (Bangni)


    Jino

    The Jino (also spelled Jinuo) people (simplified Chinese: 基诺族; traditional Chinese: 基諾族; pinyin: Jīnu z; endonym: [tɕyno] or [kyno][citation needed]) are a Tibeto-Burman ethnic group. They form one of the 56 ethnic groups officially recognized by the People's Republic of China. They live in Xishuangbanna in Yunnan province, China.


    Han Chinese

    Han Chinese (simplified Chinese: 汉族 or 汉人; traditional Chinese: 漢族 or 漢人; pinyin: hnz or hnrn) are an ethnic group native to China and, by most modern definitions, the largest single ethnic group in the world.

    Han Chinese constitute about 92% of the population of the People's Republic of China (mainland China), 98% of the population of the Republic of China (Taiwan), 75% of the population of Singapore, and about 20% of the entire global human population. There is substantial genetic, linguistic, cultural, and social diversity among the subgroups of the Han, mainly due to thousands of years of immigration and assimilation of various regional ethnicities and tribes within China. The Han Chinese are a subset of the Chinese nation (Zhonghua minzu). An alternate name that many Chinese peoples use to refer to themselves is "Descendants of the Dragon" (Chinese: 龍的傳人 or 龙的传人). Many Han and other Chinese also call themselves "Descendants of the Yan Di (Yan Emperor) and Huang Di (Yellow Emperor)" (Chinese: 炎黃子孫 or 炎黄子孙).


    The Diversity of China

    You can find out more about them here:

    http://news.wenxuecity.com/messages/...g5-952715.html

    http://www.neatorama.com/2009/12/02/...ethnic-groups/

    http://www.chinahush.com/2009/12/06/...oups-in-china/

    http://www.2point6billion.com/news/2...oups-3354.html

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