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Thread: Who is (h)abesha?1269 days old

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    Quote Originally Posted by ethioboy View Post
    In my definition its semitic speaking horners...
    What about native Arabic speaking Eritreans (Rashaida, some Beja etc)?

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    Habesha in my mind = Ethiopian Jews.

    Regards.

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    Quote Originally Posted by memobekes View Post
    Habesha in my mind = Ethiopian Jews.

    Regards.
    ?! I always thought they're Agaw.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hanan View Post
    thank u guys for answering my question, but I'm still a bit confused because everybody has another definition of this term...
    There are really only two. One to refer to all Eritrea/Ethiopia, and one to refer to all Semitic speakers (sometimes restricted to Christian).

    Quote Originally Posted by hanan View Post
    ?! I always thought they're Agaw.
    They are.

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    I have always been confused regarding the true definition of who a real "habesha" is. In the technical sense it refers to the Semitic speaking people of the horn of Africa. But personally in my opinion (with probable agreement from other "habeshas") it refers to the horners from Ethiopia and Eritrea who have the generic/stereotypical features and physical actions that make them "habesha". (btw this is regardless of ethnic group).

    I have started a thread before relating this question.

    http://www.forumbiodiversity.com/showthread.php?t=7750
    http://www.forumbiodiversity.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=1595&dateline=1317873  961

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    I've seen all types of Ethiopians with varying features describe themselves as Abesha. Now this is a bit off topic But I find Afro Asiatic languages so fasinating. Their Tonal qualities are quite similar.

    HAUSA

    What is your name? -Mai sunan ka?
    My name is ______ . -suna na _____ne
    Sannu da aiki (said to someone at work)
    (hello back) sannu kadai [
    (how is the tiredness) ina gajiya
    [B](fine, no tiredness)[/B ] ba gajiya
    I do not speak Hausa (literally I do not hear Hausa) -Ba na jin Hausa
    I do not understand -Ban gane ba
    (in the sense of welcoming someone)- barka de zuwa
    Yes- A (sounded as letter 'a' but drawn out like 'ayyy' not 'ahhh')
    No. -A'a (sounded as 'ah ah')
    Please listen to me-(getting attention) : Don Allah ji mana
    Excuse me please-(begging pardon) : Gafara Don Allah
    I'm sorry. -Yi hak'uri-Goodbye -Sai an jima.
    See you tomorrow-Sai Gobe
    I can't speak 'Swedish' [well]. -Ba na jin harshen Swedish
    Do you speak English? -Ka na jin harshen turanci kuwa?
    Is there someone here who speaks English? -Akwai mai jin harshen turanci kusa?
    Help-Taimaka!
    Look out! -A lura sosai!

    SOMALI

    Do you understand-Miyaad fahantay?
    I understand-Maan fahmin
    Do you speak English?Ingriis miyaad ku hadashaa?
    Do you speak Somali?Af Soomaaliga maad ku hadashaa?
    Yes, a little -Haah. Wax yar.
    How do you say ... in Somali?-Maxaa af soomali lagu yiraahdaa ... ?
    Excuse me-Iga raali ahow
    How much?-Iska waran
    Sorry-Waan ka xumahay
    Please-Fadlan
    Thank you-Mahadsanid / Wad mahadsantahay
    Response-Adigaa mudan / Adaa mudan
    Where's the toilet?-Musqusha aawey?

    A conversation between a Hausa speaker and an unidentified Sudanese language speaker about the word/phrase "Lub Lub," taken from a Hausa video on youtube

    it mean the" love is over" hearth break
    yamaman21 1 year ago

    "lub lub lub in our sudanese language means to fall or involve in something without care or caution, does this meet the same meaning? Sudan"
    aawwaadd1234 2 years ago

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    Quote Originally Posted by iateyourheadphons View Post
    I have always been confused regarding the true definition of who a real "habesha" is. In the technical sense it refers to the Semitic speaking people of the horn of Africa. But personally in my opinion (with probable agreement from other "habeshas") it refers to the horners from Ethiopia and Eritrea who have the generic/stereotypical features and physical actions that make them "habesha". (btw this is regardless of ethnic group).

    I have started a thread before relating this question.

    http://www.forumbiodiversity.com/showthread.php?t=7750
    So do you consider ethiopian jews (those who are agaw) to be habesha?

    ---------- Post added 2011-08-10 at 15:16 ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Ezana View Post
    There are really only two. One to refer to all Eritrea/Ethiopia, and one to refer to all Semitic speakers (sometimes restricted to Christian).



    They are.
    Are Agaw people habesha?
    In Eritrea, the Blin people, who are agaw,aren't considered habesha (I'm not sure,though)




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    Quote Originally Posted by hanan View Post
    So do you consider ethiopian jews (those who are agaw) to be habesha?

    ---------- Post added 2011-08-10 at 15:16 ----------



    Are Agaw people habesha?
    In Eritrea, the Blin people, who are agaw,aren't considered habesha (I'm not sure,though)
    To be honest, I dont think Agew people are really integrated into modern Ethiopian society nor do I think they have much significance in Ethiopian affairs and population. Since they are a minority I wouldent consider it to be an issue if they were Habesha or not. But in the sense that they look "habesha" imo ( and they have the generic Ethiopian - Eritrean features and physical actions) then yes I would consider them Habesha. But im not sure if they are more culturally Cushitic or Semitic, so I dont really know.

    I have never really met an Agew person, but they are from various places in Amhara land and I consider people from Gojam, and Wello to Habesha? And I never knew Falasha people were Agew.

    BTW I have heard many times that Eritrean Tigray people dont consider themselves Habesha? Is this true? Since you are Eritrean?
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    Quote Originally Posted by iateyourheadphons View Post
    To be honest, I dont think Agew people are really integrated into modern Ethiopian society nor do I think they have much significance in Ethiopian affairs and population. Since they are a minority I wouldent consider it to be an issue if they were Habesha or not. But in the sense that they look "habesha" imo ( and they have the generic Ethiopian - Eritrean features and physical actions) then yes I would consider them Habesha. But im not sure if they are more culturally Cushitic or Semitic, so I dont really know.

    I have never really met an Agew person, but they are from various places in Amhara land and I consider people from Gojam, and Wello to Habesha? And I never knew Falasha people were Agew.

    BTW I have heard many times that Eritrean Tigray people dont consider themselves Habesha? Is this true? Since you are Eritrean?
    Do you mean tigrinya people or tigre people? I do not know if Tigre people are considered habesha, although they speak a south-semitic language(maybe that's due to cultural and religious customs),but Tigrinya people consider themselves habesha.
    Another thing I know is ,that some the uber-patriotic and brainwashed eritrean habesha say that amhara and tigrayans aren't habesha - but that's bullshit...

    I know some agews (eritrean blin), for example my aunt's husband is an christian Agew of the Blin group in Eritrea, but I never asked him about that topic.

    I have an other question: The name of my father's village is not Tigrinya, it's Blin but all the people there say that they're 100% tigrinya. I did some research,because I thought that the inhabitants of that village are "tigrinized" Blin,but I didn't find anything. I know that in Ethiopia there was some "amharization" among some ethnic groups. Did something like "tigrinyazation" exist in Eritrea?
    Last edited by hanan; 2011-08-10 at 22:01. Reason: grammar




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    Quote Originally Posted by hanan View Post
    Do you mean tigrinya people or tigre people? I do not know if Tigre people are considered habesha, although they speak a south-semitic language(maybe that's due to cultural and religious customs),but Tigrinya people consider themselves habesha.
    Another thing I know is ,that some the uber-patriotic and brainwashed eritrean habesha say that amhara and tigrayans aren't habesha - but that's bullshit...

    I know some agews (eritrean blin), for example my aunt's husband is an christian Agew of the Blin group in Eritrea, but I never asked him about that topic.

    I have an other question: The name of my father's village is not Tigrinya, it's Blin but all the people there say that they're 100% tigrinya. I did some research,because I thought that the inhabitants of that village are "tigrinized" Blin,but I didn't find anything. I know that in Ethiopia there was some "amharization" among some ethnic groups. Did something like "tigrinyazation" exist in Eritrea?
    I always thought Tigrinya= the Tigray language, and Tigray= the actual people. And yes by "Tigray" I am referring to the "Tigrinya people", not the Tigre.

    I wish I knew or have at least seen Agew. A cousin of mine in Addis told me her home cook was Agew. I wonder if they look any different from your average Habesha?

    That is a possibility, as you mentioned "Amharazation" took place in Shewa, many families from what I know changed their ethnic title to Amhara, or in the most probable case Amhara highlanders from Gonder, Gojjam and Well settled overtime in Shewa and intermixed with the Oromo population thus currently creating the ethnically mixed region of Shewa. In most cases people from Shewa are not purely part of a single ethnic group, most of the time the people have ancestry from Amhara, Oromo, and Guragay.

    I am not sure if this is the case with Tigray Eritreans, but since they're the culturally dominant population in Eritrea it is surely a possibility that those Bilin people adopted their customs to "fit in". Or maybe most lickely the Tigrays culturally intermixed and mingled with the Bilin people. I dont know much on the Blin people, aren't they Cushitic Agew? Do they look any different from Tigrays?
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