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Thread: Jomon Y-DNA and Jomon mtDNA in each Japanese province814 days old

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    Default Jomon Y-DNA and Jomon mtDNA in each Japanese province

    I've used language translator converter page, but I'm unable to convert what those graphs say. I only know one of the provinces name sorry.

    Note: Jomon comfirmed mtDNA are M7a, N9b since they are found in highest frequencies in ancient Jomon skeleton and in modern Ainu, Japanese, Okinawan. Jomon Y-DNA are C1 and D2 since they are found only in ancient Jomons and modern Japanese, Ainu, Okinawans. Other Jomon DNA that are not included in the graph are M10, M8 both are mtDNA found in ancient Jomons however Koreans have little of that too, so there's way of knowing if they were contributed by Koreans or by ancient Jomons.


    Jomon mtDNA (N9b and M7a) in Japanese provinces




    Jomon Y-DNA in ( C1 + D2a ) in Japanese provinces




    I only know 九州 is Kyushu and that is all by luck from Wikipedia.

    Jomon Y-DNA is 31% ( D2 28% + C1 3%)
    Jomon mtDNA is 13.5% ( M7a 12% + N9b 1.5%)




    Here's Japanese from Kyushu with all Jomon DNA they still look no different to Koreans and Chinese. Well it's actually very rare to find Japanese with Jomon influence usually than than 1%. I'm guessing these Jomon natives mixed with Yayoi, 50/50 later another way of Yayoi made Japanese 25/75%, later another wave of Yayoi migrant made Japanese 20/80 more similar to Chinese, Korea. I guess is true what they say, genetic mixed race below 25% has little to know influence in your appearance.

    I've read that average Japanese are genetically 45% Korean + 35% Chinese + 20% Jomon

    Last edited by ButlerKing; 2012-08-30 at 13:28.

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    Am J Phys Anthropol. 2009 Mar;138(3):255-65.

    Mitochondrial DNA analysis of Jomon skeletons from the Funadomari site, Hokkaido
    Ancient DNA recovered from 16 Jomon skeletons excavated from Funadomari site, Hokkaido, Japan was analyzed to elucidate the genealogy of the early settlers of the Japanese archipelago. Both the control and coding regions of their mitochondrial DNA were analyzed in detail, and we could securely assign 14 mtDNAs to relevant haplogroups. Haplogroups D1a, M7a, and N9b were observed in these individuals, and N9b was by far the most predominant. The fact that haplogroups N9b and M7a were observed in Hokkaido Jomons bore out the hypothesis that these haplogroups are the (pre-) Jomon contribution to the modern Japanese mtDNA pool. Moreover, the fact that Hokkaido Jomons shared haplogroup D1 with Native Americans validates the hypothesized genetic affinity of the Jomon people to Native Americans, providing direct evidence for the genetic relationships between these populations. However, probably due to the small sample size or close consanguinity among the members of the site, the frequencies of the haplogroups in Funadomari skeletons were quite different from any modern populations, including Hokkaido Ainu, who have been regarded as the direct descendant of the Hokkaido Jomon people. It appears that the genetic study of ancient populations in northern part of Japan brings important information to the understanding of human migration in northeast Asia and America.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18951391
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    Y-DNA C and D fits with the East-Asian autosomal DNA. They are the aboriginal EastAsian Mongoloids.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ubirajara View Post
    Am J Phys Anthropol. 2009 Mar;138(3):255-65.

    Mitochondrial DNA analysis of Jomon skeletons from the Funadomari site, Hokkaido

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18951391
    mtDNA D1 should prove that Jomon are related with Proto-mongoloid Native American.

    D1 is found in 15-30% of ancient Jomon, and 18% in Native Americans but 33-50% in some part of South Americans Indians.



    N9b and M7a is the most predominate and is found in all 3 Jomon groups sampled.

    M7a

    1) 7.1%
    2) 30%
    3) 3.7%

    N9b

    1) 64.3%
    2) 60%
    3) 13%


    M10 and M8a

    3) 3.7% and 5% = 8.7%

    Last edited by ButlerKing; 2012-08-30 at 14:22.

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    From an autosomal study on the Jomon:

    The genetic origins of Japanese populations have been controversial. Upper Paleolithic Japanese, i.e. Jomon, developed independently in Japanese islands for more than 10,000 years until the isolation was ended with the influxes of continental immigrants about 2,000 years ago. However, the knowledge of origin of Jomon and its contribution to the genetic pool of contemporary Japanese is still limited, albeit the extensive studies using mtDNA and Y chromosomes. In this report, we aimed to infer the origin of Jomon and to estimate its contribution to Japanese by fitting an admixture model with missing data from Jomon to a genome-wide data from 94 worldwide populations. Our results showed that the genetic contributions of Jomon, the Paleolithic contingent in Japanese, are 54.3∼62.3% in Ryukyuans and 23.1∼39.5% in mainland Japanese, respectively. Utilizing inferred allele frequencies of the Jomon population, we further showed the Paleolithic contingent in Japanese had a Northeast Asia origin

    In the ‘continuity’ model, modern Japanese are considered as direct decedents of Jomon, the inhabitants of Japan in Paleolithic time, while their morphology showed secular changes. In the ‘admixture’ model, Jomon admixed with the Yayoi, more recent continental immigrants, which is consistent with the rapid changes in morphology and culture which took place synchronically about 2,500 years before present (BP). In the ‘replacement’ model, Paleolithic Jomon was completely replaced by the continental immigrants (Yayoi) after their arrival. To date, the ‘admixture’ model is seemingly better supported by the increasing lines of evidence of multiple genetic components found in modern Japanese.

    The upper Paleolithic populations, i.e. Jomon, reached Japan 30,000 years ago from somewhere in Asia when the present Japanese Islands were connected to the continent. The separation of Japanese archipelago from the continent led to a long period (∼13,000 – 2,300 years B.P) of isolation and independent evolution of Jomon. The patterns of intraregional craniofacial diversity in Japan suggest little effect on the genetic structure of the Jomon from long-term gene flow stemming from an outside source during the isolation. The isolation was ended by large-scale influxes of immigrants, known as Yayoi, carrying rice farming technology and metal tools via the Korean Peninsula. The immigration began around 2,300 years B.P. and continued for the subsequent 1,000 years. Based on linguistic studies, it is suggested that the immigrants were likely from Northern China, but not a branch of proto-Korean.

    Genetic studies on Y-chromosome and mitochondrial haplogroups disclosed more details about origins of modern Japanese. In Japanese, about 51.8% of paternal lineages belong to haplogroup O6, and mostly the subgroups O3 and O2b, both of which were frequently observed in mainland populations of East Asia, such as Han Chinese and Korean. Another Y haplogroup, D2, making up 35% of the Japanese male lineages, could only be found in Japan. The haplogroups D1, D3, and D*, the closest relatives of D2, are scattered around very specific regions of Asia, such as the Andaman Islands, Indonesia, Southwest China, and Tibet. In addition, C1 is the other haplogroup unique to Japan. It was therefore speculated that haplogroups D2 and O may represent Jomon and Yayoi migrants, respectively. However, no mitochondrial haplotypes, except M7a, that shows significant difference in distribution between modern Japanese and mainlanders5. Interestingly, a recent study of genome-wide SNPs showed that 7,003 Japanese individuals could be assigned to two differentiated clusters, Hondo and Ryukyu, further supporting the notion that modern Japanese may be descendent of the admixture of two different components.
    http://www.nature.com/srep/2012/1204...srep00355.html
    Last edited by Ubirajara; 2012-09-07 at 02:25.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ubirajara View Post
    From an autosomal study on the Jomon:


    http://www.nature.com/srep/2012/1204...srep00355.html
    This genetic study has been criticized, at least by Dienekes criticism of the paper. It is absurd to think that Okinawans are 54.3∼62.3% Jomon. If they were really were more Jomon than Yayoi than we be seeing Hen Kirai looking people in Okinawa rather than Japanese, Korean, Chinese.

    Take a look at these Okinawans... they don't even look 1/4 Jomon.




    When Uyghurs who are 52-63% Caucasoid can look like this


    When average Kazakhs who are 70% Mongoloid look like this (some are also 40-60% Mongoloid)


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    The only difference I see in Okinawans and Japanese is when they have kids with a European person; their kids look "whiter" in my experience its kind of hard to explain but its easy to see after awhile

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    Well sexual selection and other factors can mean that genetic admixture may be higher in a population than what appears in their phenotype. We have seen it often in these Native-admixed Latin Americans who appear very European, but come back 20-40% Native in their DNA results. If the Yayoi expansion of Korean and Chinese looking neo-mongoloid rice farmers from the mainland created a new society which assimilated the original Jomon inhabitants, you could expect that sexual selection would apply in favor of their appearance, not the indigenous population.

    Anyway, good thread, guys. Thanks for all of the information.

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