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Thread: Share stories of your ancestors3163 days old

  1. #201
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    My mom's Scottish grandparents in Canada were well known shipbuilders who even had an ship building company named after their family name , my Ukrainian grandma's dad from my dad's side was well known to be a proud Cossack who was a great swimmer and rode in the a Ukrainian army.
    Also my mom's father spoke 6 languages in Canada, and her mother from Zimbabwe had parents who were a nurse and an mining engineer in South Africa in a British colony. Unfortunately I still have to discover the stories from my dad's fathers side, but apparently he was a winemaker which is neat.

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    My genealogy is pretty vanilla, mostly farmers, miners and craftsmen in rural Western Mexico, though some of those ancestors founded a small farming town in the 1800's.

    In addition, I seem to be descended from some of the first settler families to the New Mexico/Colorado region.

    Probably the most scandalous stuff I can find about my ancestors were relationship affairs, I could write a reality show out of my ancestors' love drama .
    "Living or dying, it's not a big deal. What we should be concerned about is whether or not we're allowed to crawl to our graves."

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  6. #203
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    OK, I’m adding here a story about an ancestor of mine born in Sonora, Mexico. The era is the 1800’s long before drug cartels, long before presidential candidates calling mexicanos “bad hombres” and where most of the Sonoranos were either vaqueros o mineros. The 1846-1848 war between the US and Mexico had just ended and news of the discovery of gold in California erupted around the world. The silver mines of Sonora were grinding to a halt as ore became more and more scarce. It is about a 15 year old boy plaqued with gold fever who set out north to seek his fortune in the California goldfields. Francisco, the 15 year old boy mentioned, had never been away from home, had unspeakable dangers laying ahead on “el camino del diablo” , (the devil’s highway) a path really that lead across the unforbodden barren desert landscape where temperatures can soar to 120 degrees Fahrenheit and water is far and limited at best. Gold fever over rides common sense and he set out. In 1850, we find Francisco at the rio Colorado, across the river from the present day Yuma, AZ in “Arizona City”. Months later we found him in the Sonora, California area. We do not presently know if Francisco made riches in the gold fields of California, we expect he did not as most miners didn’t but we found him marrying a young Californiana in 1860 along the coast. Her family dated back to the Spanish colonial era of California. We recently found Francisco’s US naturalization documents of 1863 in California. He and his wife had many children and “appeared” to be happy until the birth of their last son. It seems that the baby-sitter looking after the kids while she gave birth, also was looking after the needs of the old man too because she became pregnant with his child. . . . We recently found the divorce documents in California dated 1880. In 1889, Francisco’s first wife died of “consumption” and by 1900 US census, we find Francisco, the baby-sitter, and all the kids in a nearby state. The journey, taking several months, had come down the CA coastline, and crossed the desert. Riders, (family members) , would ride ahead of the progression to arrange grazing, grain and water for the livestock as well as provisions for the people.

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  8. #204
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opie View Post
    OK, I’m adding here a story about an ancestor of mine born in Sonora, Mexico. The era is the 1800’s long before drug cartels, long before presidential candidates calling mexicanos “bad hombres” and where most of the Sonoranos were either vaqueros o mineros. The 1846-1848 war between the US and Mexico had just ended and news of the discovery of gold in California erupted around the world. The silver mines of Sonora were grinding to a halt as ore became more and more scarce. It is about a 15 year old boy plaqued with gold fever who set out north to seek his fortune in the California goldfields. Francisco, the 15 year old boy mentioned, had never been away from home, had unspeakable dangers laying ahead on “el camino del diablo” , (the devil’s highway) a path really that lead across the unforbodden barren desert landscape where temperatures can soar to 120 degrees Fahrenheit and water is far and limited at best. Gold fever over rides common sense and he set out. In 1850, we find Francisco at the rio Colorado, across the river from the present day Yuma, AZ in “Arizona City”. Months later we found him in the Sonora, California area. We do not presently know if Francisco made riches in the gold fields of California, we expect he did not as most miners didn’t but we found him marrying a young Californiana in 1860 along the coast. Her family dated back to the Spanish colonial era of California. We recently found Francisco’s US naturalization documents of 1863 in California. He and his wife had many children and “appeared” to be happy until the birth of their last son. It seems that the baby-sitter looking after the kids while she gave birth, also was looking after the needs of the old man too because she became pregnant with his child. . . . We recently found the divorce documents in California dated 1880. In 1889, Francisco’s first wife died of “consumption” and by 1900 US census, we find Francisco, the baby-sitter, and all the kids in a nearby state. The journey, taking several months, had come down the CA coastline, and crossed the desert. Riders, (family members) , would ride ahead of the progression to arrange grazing, grain and water for the livestock as well as provisions for the people.
    Very interesting story, one usually doesn't read about the details of an individual migrating to the US from Mexico during the 1800's.

    Sadly, I think your story was quite common for the 1800's, while I don't know if they were the babysitter, but many of my male ancestors from the 1800's got remarried to much younger women after their wives passed away, or they simply had families with several women.

    I've found many scandals in my family tree, but two of them stick out to me the most.

    First was my 5th great grandfather marrying his 2nd wife(1st one I descend from was deceased) in 1874, when he was 68 and she was 19, they went on to have 5 kids, 3 survived till adulthood. To make it even weirder, his 2nd wife was the cousin of my 3rd great grandfather's(5th's grandson) 1st wife.

    Second case was my 4th great grandfather(above 5th great's son from 1st wife) who had an affair in 1860 with his wife's sister and got her pregnant, when he was 29 and she was 14. He was initially punished by the local authorities, but I'm guessing it was a slap on the wrist, since he was back with his wife a couple months later having more children. However, many documents after 1866 state that he was deceased, yet I can't find any death records for him, so I assume he got in trouble again, was killed and written off the record lol.
    Last edited by a_garcia49; 2019-03-23 at 17:59. Reason: Typos and Extra Details
    "Living or dying, it's not a big deal. What we should be concerned about is whether or not we're allowed to crawl to our graves."

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    I would like now to share a story about a merchant family man named Santiago. Santiago comes from an old name “Yago” meaning James so Santiago simply means “Saint James” Today’s spanish eqivelant to James is Jaime. Santiago was a “norteño” who lived in Sonora . The time period was mid 19th century, post US/Mex war of 1846-1848 but pre-Gadsden purchase of 1853 so Tucson Arizona was still be Tucson, Sonora Mexico.
    Santiago left his pregnant wife and children home to make a journey to sell goods at Tucson and buy supplies for his small town mercado.
    He got to Tucson where he stayed with a cousin a few days and then headed back with a load of harina and other goods that would otherwise not be available in his small pueblo. The trip went fine,taking several days, until he got just south of what would be todays international border. We don’t know many details of the attack but we do know that it was Apaches. We also know that they drove off the team of horses and a pack burro. The wagon was over turned. Near the wagon was Santiago’s body laying on the desert floor with an arrow wound in the back. His unborn child left at home would be my great-grandfather.

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    I was told that my one of my great grandfathers, the one from Pennsylvania, on Devils Night (the night before Halloween), also called Mischief Night, took a neighbors car apart and reassembled it on their roof.

    But of course he was found out/caught the next day and was made to take it apart again and reassemble it on the ground.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Mischief Night
    Mischief Night is an informal holiday on which some children and teenagers engage in pranks and minor vandalism. It is known by a variety of names.

    Historical background
    The earliest reference to Mischief Night is from 1790 when a headmaster encouraged a school play which ended in "an Ode to Fun which praises children's tricks on Mischief Night in most approving terms".[1] In the United Kingdom, these pranks were originally carried out as part of May Day celebrations, but shifted to later in the year, dates varying in different areas, some marking it on October 30, the night before Halloween, others on November 4, the night before Bonfire Night. According to one historian, "May Day and the Green Man had little resonance for children in grimy cities. They looked at the opposite end of the year and found the ideal time, the night before the gunpowder plot."[1] However, the shift only happened in the late nineteenth century and is described by the Opies as "one of the mysteries of the folklore calendar".[2] In Germany, Mischief Night is still celebrated on May 1.[citation needed]

    Naming variations
    In the United States and Canada
    In most of New Jersey, as well as in New Orleans, Philadelphia, Eastern Pennsylvania, Delaware, parts of New York State, and Connecticut, it is referred to as "Mischief Night" or, particularly in the Great Lakes region, "Devil's Night". In some towns in Northern New Jersey and parts of New York State, it is also known as "Goosey Night".[3][4]

    Meanwhile, in Baltimore, Maryland, it has traditionally been referred to as "Moving Night" due to the custom of exchanging or stealing porch furniture and other outside items.[5]

    In rural Niagara Falls, Ontario, during the 1950s and 1960s, Cabbage Night (French: Nuit de Chou) referred to the custom of raiding local gardens for leftover rotting cabbages and hurling them about to create mischief in the neighborhood. Today, the night is still celebrated in Ontario but is commonly known as "Cabbage Night" in parts of Vermont; Connecticut; Bergen County, New Jersey; Upstate New York; Northern Kentucky; Newport, Rhode Island; Western Massachusetts; and Boston, Massachusetts.[6]

    It is known as "Gate Night" in New Hampshire, West Kootenay (British Columbia), Vancouver Island, Winnipeg, Thunder Bay (Ontario), Bay City (Michigan), Rockland County (New York), North Dakota and South Dakota; as "Mat Night" in English-speaking Quebec; and as "Devil's Night" in many places throughout Canada, Michigan, and western Pennsylvania.[7]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mischief_Night
    Last edited by ~Elizabeth~; 2019-04-14 at 07:21.

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  14. #207
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    Late 1700’s: a presidio comandante sent a group of soldados out to track and return a runaway native for allegedly causing a ruckus of some kind. The guy in question went into the coastal range of California and the comandante told the sergeant in command to divide his men so some could prospect a little. The sergeant did just that, divided up his small force, left two behind to establish camp and guard the horses. Upon returning to the camp, the two left behind were dead due to arrow wounds. One of the two dead left behind a very young viuda. So young in fact, that she was only 15 yo.
    The 45 yo comandante felt sorry for the young widow and began to console her. He must have gotten a little over zealous because the young mestiza (mixed) widow became pregnant. The criollo comandante of basque descent could not marry a mestiza nor could the child use his surname.
    The comandante and the young mestiza did go into the chapel and declare he the father but it was arranged for a soldado amoung the ranks to marry her. It is for this reason that my 3rd great father was originally cristened with the comandante’s surname but used his stepfather’s surname until he went to get married and found who his real father was. At that time, and for the rest of his life, he assumed the surname of his mother’s deseased first husband.
    We had a horrible time trying to sort this all out and finding my great grandmother’s surname was not her actual surname biologically.

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    My great-great-grandfather fought in first world war, he was injured and lost a leg. He was part of the White Army in imperial Russia, than commies took over and his son later migrated to my country in Latin America. My great-grandparents were from the same village and met here, so my granny was born. moya babushka.


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    I have yet another ancestor story. In the northern part of Sonora that today is Arizona, USA, a new presidio or fort was established. It was opened as a deterrent to the Apache who were relatively late comers of the natives to the area. They were raiding both native and spanish routes and settlements. The presidio was “Santa Cruz de Terrenate” and it was at first commanded by Lt. Francisco Tovar. About 8 mos after its founding in July 1776, as the continental congress voted to adapt the Declaration of Independants from England, (yes, weird, but congress actually did something then)several thousand miles away on the east coast, Tovar and 29 men, (one my ancestor Andres) rode out of the presidio for patrol.
    Two and a half days out (see tovars battle of masitas, seymour/harlen or deni seymour) after about 36-38 miles, they spotted a band of apaches across the rio San Pedro. They instantly looked for and found a crossing (to this day, the river is plaqued with quicksand) , dismounted and began to cross. Soon there were many apache and a battle pursued. It appears that the soldados did reach the opposite side but was overcome. Tover and 25 of his soldados were “muerto en batalla” or killed in battle. One of those killed was Andres.
    The presidio would see some 80 soldados killed and 2 other comandantes before being abandoned in 1780. The apache, after masitas would go on to disrupt supply lines by attacking supply wagon trains and prevent farming, and also by raiding livestock.


    As one official explained in the 1780’s
    “The terror instilled in the troops and settlers of the Presidio of Santa Cruz that had seen two captains and more than 80 men perish at the hands of the enemies in the open rolling ground at a short distance from the post, and the incessant attacks which they suffered from the numerous bands of Apache, who do not permit cultivation of the crops, who surprise the mule trains carrying effects and supplies, who rob the horse herds and put the troops in the situation of not being able to attend their own defense, making them useless for the defense of the province.”
    Last edited by Opie; 2019-04-30 at 03:32.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Opie View Post
    I have yet another ancestor story. In the northern part of Sonora that today is Arizona, USA, a new presidio or fort was established. It was opened as a deterrent to the Apache who were relatively late comers of the natives to the area. They were raiding both native and spanish routes and settlements. The presidio was “Santa Cruz de Terrenate” and it was at first commanded by Lt. Francisco Tovar. About 8 mos after its founding in July 1776, as the continental congress voted to adapt the Declaration of Independants from England, (yes, weird, but congress actually did something then)several thousand miles away on the east coast, Tovar and 29 men, (one my ancestor Andres) rode out of the presidio for patrol.
    Two and a half days out (see tovars battle of masitas, seymour/harlen or deni seymour) after about 36-38 miles, they spotted a band of apaches across the rio San Pedro. They instantly looked for and found a crossing (to this day, the river is plaqued with quicksand) , dismounted and began to cross. Soon there were many apache and a battle pursued. It appears that the soldados did reach the opposite side but was overcome. Tover and 25 of his soldados were “muerto en batalla” or killed in battle. One of those killed was Andres.
    The presidio would see some 80 soldados killed and 2 other comandantes before being abandoned in 1780. The apache, after masitas would go on to disrupt supply lines by attacking supply wagon trains and prevent farming, and also by raiding livestock.


    As one official explained in the 1780’s
    “The terror instilled in the troops and settlers of the Presidio of Santa Cruz that had seen two captains and more than 80 men perish at the hands of the enemies in the open rolling ground at a short distance from the post, and the incessant attacks which they suffered from the numerous bands of Apache, who do not permit cultivation of the crops, who surprise the mule trains carrying effects and supplies, who rob the horse herds and put the troops in the situation of not being able to attend their own defense, making them useless for the defense of the province.”
    Wow, your ancestors were involved in all kinds of dangerous mischief huh?

    Looking through various parish records of the region where my ancestry is from(Western and Southern Jalisco), majority of people died from good ole fashioned illness, fever, or childbirth. Death by violence was very rare in the records, except around the 1910's Revolution and 1930's Cristero War era. Granted, I'm sure there were quite a bit of unrecorded deaths as well.
    "Living or dying, it's not a big deal. What we should be concerned about is whether or not we're allowed to crawl to our graves."

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