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Thread: Slavic folk music recomendations?2984 days old

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    Personaly I am able to listen in larger amounts only to Southern Slavic folk music from the Balkans, but as far as Polish folk music is concerned you can experiment with small amounts of this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6zWUhVprDY

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Avp5g...eature=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTxse...eature=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAuZG...eature=related

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    duje (2011-04-20), Pale Blonde (2011-04-20)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pale Blonde View Post
    Yeah Jews have a habit of copying ideas from others, I'm sure it runs very deep into their roots.
    We took your songs, you took our religion. I say we call it even.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wojewoda View Post
    Personaly I am able to listen in larger amounts only to Southern Slavic folk music from the Balkans, but as far as Polish folk music is concerned you can experiment with small amounts of this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6zWUhVprDY

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Avp5g...eature=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTxse...eature=related

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAuZG...eature=related
    As a reference to everyone, IDK if it is Polish or whatever. I'm not listening to it because I want to identify with that part of my heritage, just listening to it because I like it. I am willing to experiment with any of the Slavic languages, because they all seem to sound more interesting and musical than English.

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    Not really folk music, but I like it:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7szYTy_ewA4
    Quote Originally Posted by Scholar View Post
    R1a1 is not Indo-European

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    Varsaw Village Band once more, this time from their concert in Dublin:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLlMQ...eature=related

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    And Warsaw Village Band for the last time.

    The Warsaw Village Band's debut international release, People's Spring, has echoes of the familiar in its heady modern interpretations of ancient Polish Folk music: klezmer, Scandinavian-sounding melodies, singing that sometimes recalls the Bulgarian Women's Choir in its otherworldly harmony, and some trance-inducing backbeats. But it's ultimately unclassifiable, skipping genres and seamlessly melding tradition and experimentation in music that upholds its folk roots while not being bound by them. Using ancient and little-heard traditional Polish instruments like the suka--a Polish fiddle from the 16th century--and the Polish dulcimer, the Warsaw Village Band crafts their own soundscapes, infusing folk tradition with a thoroughly modern attitude. "Chassidic Dance," with its Jewish melodies and trip-hop slanted drumming, and the dirges "At My Mother's" and "Clear Water" achieve an organic fusion tinged with the psychedelic. Meanwhile, the group's lyrics amplify its contemporary leanings: "Who Is Getting Married" takes a feminist stance on marriage and "Cranes" sets an anarchistic protest song to bombastic rhythm. The group's mix of old and new styles is so complete in fact, that the last two songs on the album--dance floor-ready remixes by two Polish DJ's--are almost redundant, mixing electronic beats with Polish folk melodies in a manner not all that different from the organic remixing the Warsaw Village Band realizes throughout the whole album.
    The Warsaw Village Band have already run off with a Best Newcomer trophy from the BBC'sAwards for World Music 2004. The rebellious Polish six-piece describe their house style as'hardcore folk', and the signature sound is indeed formed by uncompromising traditionalism, updated with a guttural punk rock aesthetic.

    Maja Kleszcz, Sylwia Swiatkowska and Magdalena Sobczak divide up the vocals, forming a mini-choir. Between them, the three also play violin, cello and dulcimer. The men of the band are Wojtek Krzak (violin), Maciej Szajkowski (frame drum) and Piotr Glinski (traditional baraban drum).

    This follow-up to their enthusiastically received People's Springconsolidates their position with an exhilarating rush of perverted traditionalism. Two songs, the opening "In The Forest" and "When Johnny Went To Fight In The War", feature turntable scratching and demented siren effects, courtesy of FeelX and Mario Activator. Uncannily, these guest additions feel entirely logical when set beside grainily sawing fiddles and strident three-way vocalisations.

    The Lipsk Women's Choir underline the band's group voices with a touch of the real thing in two of the album's tracks. The WVB pay homage to their mentors with brief bridging snatches of Janina and Kazimierz Zdrzalik, veteran players who have been responsible for passing down skills and even some of their old instruments.

    "At The Front Of The Gates" is steeped in trudging melancholy, but it's followed by a sprightly instrumental polka, highlighting nimble fiddle and cascading dulcimer. "Matthew" is a fine example of Polish reggae, with the three singers vibrating at their most stentorian pitch. "Grey Horse" is stripped right down to violin, cello and drum.

    The WVB's hectic vocal lines have a harsh, almost shouted quality which might scare off some listeners. Likewise, the string sounds are grainy-edged and aggressively scraped. The drumming is direct and powerful, recorded close-up for maximum resonance.It is these qualities, however, which lend their old folk material a crucial sense of immediacy and excitement.
    Four years ago, when Warsaw Village Band released Uprooting, it seemed they would be the first Polish roots musicians to make a major impact in the west. Now, following an unnecessary remix version during singer and cellist Maja Kleszcz's maternity leave, they return with a new album that confirms them as one of the Europe's most intriguing, adventurous bands. The starting point is still the vocal work of Kleszcz and the driving, spine-tingling harmonies of two other young singers, Magdalena Sobczak-Kotnarowska and Sylwia Swiatkowska, on dulcimer and violin. Three male band members add violin and hand drums. The group mix cello and violin with constantly shifting rhythms and influences that range from dance songs to pared-down acoustic funk; scratching effects match the squeaky violins. There's a sturdy, string-backed Polish blues, some African-influenced chanting, and even a drifting Polish-Indian raga featuring dulcimer and an ancient fiddle, the suka. It's a bravely confident collision of styles, and it works.

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    I like Bulgarian music but the first one sounded like it came from the heart of Kurdistan.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JaM View Post
    Russian Lullaby on the Gusli.
    Sort of introspective but deeply felt. A very emotional piece, due to the way it's played.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDWwH...eature=related
    Instrumental is how I prefer Slavic folk music. There are a few YouTube videos that I've seen in the past, but I can't find them right now.

    Quote Originally Posted by Danielion View Post
    I like the following for some reason:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypH_fNDdKio
    This is the Russian / Slavic folk dance that I've come to appreciate. Very imaginative and creative.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydRjB...eature=related

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    slavia, it's not really authentic but rather a modernised rearrangement of a folklore song, most probably for the purpose of participation in a school contest or something.

    More coming in:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GV2SypcL7ZA

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQoRvGC-lz8

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6mdbqeyhzvM

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ClkLbVgf_pA

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