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Thread: Gittinger's Personality Assessment System2765 days old

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    Default Gittinger's Personality Assessment System

    About John Gittinger himself

    One of the most important was John Gittinger of Oklahoma, because he was the genius who could understand how a little child’s mind was when it was in infancy. In order to work with something, you must know what you are working with. John Gittinger, who is no longer alive, worked at programming for years. His contribution was in the mental assessment area. John Gittinger (b. 1909) was the director of psychological services at the state hospital in Norman, Oklahoma. He got a master’s degree at age 30, and joined the CIA’s MK Ultra Mind Control in 1950. He was a high school guidance counselor and a Navy lieutenant commander during W.W.II. In the late 1970s, he moved back to Oklahoma. He was heavy set and goateed. Its been said he looked like the actor Walter Slezak. He had an insatiable curiosity about understanding human personality. When the Illuminati looked around for men skilled in personality assessment to assist the Monarch Programming, John W. Gittinger was one of their men who they selected. Gittinger was not the only researcher into personality that the CIA hired, but he was their top man in terms of the programming of children. From the end of W.W. II until he began with the CIA in 1950, Gittinger was studying how to assess personality.

    At the Oklahoma State Hospital, he had large numbers of adults who could be studied. After Gittinger started doing personality assessment for the CIA. most of his work became highly classified. The Rolling Stone article of July 18, 1974 asked why years of research into personality assessment should be so secret. In fact, it was so secret, Gittinger was not allowed to talk to journalists, even though it was public knowledge that Gittinger did personality assessment work/research. The reason that such an apparently benign science was kept secret is that it plays a major part in the success of the Monarch Programming. John Gittinger designed the Personality Assessment System (PAS). This is an extraordinary method to evaluate human behavior and predict their future behavior. As far as we know, most of the PAS is still classified SECRET.
    http://educate-yourself.org/mc/illumformula1chap.shtml

    More observations on the personality types by Gittinger

    Numerous tramps and other itinerants, heading West in search of the good life in California, got stuck in Oklahoma during the cold winter months and managed to get themselves admitted to Gittinger's hospital. In warmer seasons of the year, quite a few of them worked, when they had to, as cooks or dishwashers in the short-order hamburger stands that dotted the highways in the days before fast food. They functioned perfectly well in these jobs until freezing nights drove them from their outdoor beds. The hospital staff usually called them "seasonal schizophrenics" and gave them shelter until spring. Gittinger included them in the psychological tests he was so fond of running on his patients.

    As he measured the itinerants on the Wechsler intelligence scale, a standard IQ test with 11 parts,[1] Gittinger made a chance observation that became, he says, the "bedrock" of his whole system. He noticed that the short-order cooks tended to do well on the digit-span subtest which rated their ability to remember numbers. The dishwashers, in contrast, had a poor memory for digits. Since the cooks had to keep track of many complex orders—with countless variations of medium rare, onions, and hold-the-mayo—their retentive quality served them well.

    Gittinger also noticed that the cooks had different personality traits than the dishwashers. The cooks seemed able to maintain a high degree of efficiency in a distracting environment while customers were constantly barking new orders at them. They kept their composure by falling back on their internal resources and generally shutting themselves off from the commotion around them. Gittinger dubbed this personality type, which was basically inner-directed, an "Internalizer" (abbreviated "I"). The dishwashers, on the other hand, did not have the ability to separate themselves from the external world. In order to perform their jobs, they had to be placed off in some far corner of the kitchen with their dirty pots and pans, or else all the tumult of the place diverted them from their duty. Gittinger called the dishwasher type an "Externalizer" (E). He found that if he measured a high digit span in any person—not just a short-order cook—he could make a basic judgment about personality.
    From observation, Gittinger concluded that babies were born with distinct personalities which then were modified by environmental factors. The Internalized—or I—baby was caught up in himself and tended to be seen as a passive child; hence, the world usually called him a "good baby." The E tot was more interested in outside stimuli and attention, and thus was more likely to cause his parents problems by making demands. Gittinger believed that the way parents and other authority figures reacted to the child helped to shape his personality. Adults often pressured or directed the I child to become more outgoing and the E one to become more self-sufficient. Gittinger found he could measure the compensations, or adjustments, the child made on another Wechsler subtest, the one that rated arithmetic ability. He noticed that in later life, when the person was subject to stress, these compensations tended to disappear, and the person reverted to his original personality type. Gittinger wrote that his system "makes possible the assessment of fundamental discrepancies between the surface personality and the underlying personality structure—discrepancies that produce tension, conflict, and anxiety."
    Besides the E-I dimensions, Gittinger identified two other fundamental sets of personality characteristics that he could measure with still other Wechsler subtests. Depending on how a subject did on the block design subtest, Gittinger could tell if he were Regulated (R) or Flexible (F). The Regulated person had no trouble learning by rote but usually did not understand what he learned. The Flexible individual, on the other hand, had to understand something before he learned it. Gittinger noted that R children could learn to play the piano moderately well with comparatively little effort. The F child most often hated the drudgery of piano lessons, but Gittinger observed that the great concert pianists tended to be Fs who had persevered and mastered the instrument.

    Other psychologists had thought up personality dimensions similar to Gittinger's E and I, R and F. even if they defined them somewhat differently. Gittinger's most original contribution came in a third personality dimension, which revealed how well people were able to adapt their social behavior to the demands of the culture they lived in. Gittinger found he could measure this dimension with the picture arrangement Wechsler subtest, and he called it the Role Adaptive (A) or Role Uniform (U). It corresponded to "charisma," since other people were naturally attracted to the A person while they tended to ignore the U.
    Some Human Ecology grantees, like psychiatrist Robert Hyde, were so impressed with Gittinger's system that they made the PAS a major part of their own research. Hyde routinely gave Wechslers to his subjects before plying them with liquor, as part of the Agency's efforts to find out how people react to alcohol. In 1957 Hyde moved his research team from Boston Psychopathic Hospital, where he had been America's first LSD tripper, to Butler Health Center in Providence. There, with Agency funds, Hyde built an experimental party room in the hospital, complete with pinball machine, dartboard, and bamboo bar stools. From behind a two-way mirror, psychologists watched the subjects get tipsy and made careful notes on their reaction to alcohol. Not surprisingly, the observers found that pure Internalizers became more withdrawn after several drinks, and that uncompensated Es were more likely to become garrulous—in essence, sloppy drunks. Thus Gittinger was able to make generalizations about the different ways an I or an E responded to alcohol.[2] Simply by knowing how people scored on the Wechsler digit-span test, he could predict how they would react to liquor. Hyde and Harold Abramson at Mount Sinai Hospital made the same kind of observations for LSD finding, among other things, that an E was more likely than an I to have a bad trip. (Apparently, an I is more accustomed than an E to "being into his own head" and losing touch with external reality.)
    http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/LSD/marks10.htm

    There are three possibilities for the child in regards to his original personality components: He can (1) express the component, or (2) suppress or (3) repress it. As the child goes through life, he has two periods within which he can change (suppress or repress) his behavior/personality. In the PAS, the first period is called “compensation” and the second is called “modification”. The amount of punishment for a personality trait and pressure to change from others will determine the amount of change which the child’s mind will perform on its original personality. The activity level of a person at each point in their life is also measured. The intensity of each of the scores is also rated. The actual PAS system is far more detailed than the example above, but it serves to give a simplified idea of how it works. The essential dynamics of an entire personality can be written in a short code which might be written for example 12 (E-uc Fcu + A+u+u) H+. However, even that code is shortened E-uc can be written simply ' i '. The basic 3 dimensions to personality provide 8 basic types. However, the PAS allows for 6 basic positions in each of these 8 basic types which yields 216 discrete basic types.

    Next, the person can change their predisposed primitive personality initially 5 different ways, and this then gives (30) or 27,000 different types. The second change can be done on 4 types of modification which makes for 1,728,000 types. Then the programmers can factor in activity level, their “Normal” level (intelligence base), age, sex, and education, and life experiences. In other words, what appears to be simple has a high degree of calibration to it. The person who was best with the PAS was its brainchild Gittinger himself. His intuition along with his PAS system, gave him an uncanny idea of how a person's s mind works now, and how it would work in the future. He sadistically reveled in putting his skill to use programming children.
    http://educate-yourself.org/mc/illumformula1chap.shtml

    Really amazing stuff if you can spare time to read up on it. In a nutshell, Gittinger was the first to professionally put forward (secretively however . . .) a personality assessment system which is carried out VERY VERY differently to more common personality assessment systems, usually of a more qualitative design. Gittinger on the other hand believed that intelligence testing tools could do more then just assess intelligence, but also provide authorities with an insight into different peoples behavioural mechanisms and likely future patterns of behaviour. He disregarded full scale IQ's and worked with sub-test results in a selected majority off the Weschler intelligence tests. I guess a thought-provoking question after having read up on his findings, is whether intelligence testing may simply measure alot more accurately 'personality/behaviour' more so then 'intelligence,' or are both not to be compared and be instead regarded comorbid qualities, as opposed to seperate?

    For a more in-depth read, check out, http://www.pasf.org/wechsler.htm
    Last edited by Svin; 2010-01-27 at 08:04.

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    I just wanted to say thanks for the informative article you posted. It's very interesting and i love looking into that type of stuff like you wouldn't believe. I had the same thoughts while reading that book. It would be really interesting. I really liked that book and have recommended it along with Fisher of Men to some friends who are starting up a sort of HUMINT program.

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    Gittinger profiled anyone and everyone. He advised presidents on how to deal with other world leaders, friends and enemies alike. One particularly useful application of the Personality Assessment System was to identify people, who would be easily hypnotized. It has likely been used extensively to hand-pick subjects and employees on sensitive projects within and beyond MK-ULTRA, assessing peoples personalities to discover, who would retain secrecy and loyalty within the Agency. I think PAS is probably highly advanced and accurate, since it is still classified, and what the general public knows about it pre-dates the 60's.

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