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Thread: Northern European Archaeology, the first millennium2509 days old

  1. #131
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    Race Realist Lemminkäinen's Avatar
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    Finland was not a Viking country, but still numerous Viking swords have been found here, more than from England and Denmark. History is beliefs, it is values of our hearts, not intellectualism and logical reasoning. Today metal detectors have recovered more than we want to believe.. Top countries of found Viking swords

    Norway over 2000
    Sweden 600-700
    Finland over 400

    Keeping in mind that the Finnish population during the Viking Age was only one third of the Swedish population, this is shocking. But this is nothing to be amazed, the population genetic will reveal much more after we forget our delusions. I have now tested new Sigtuna samples from the late Viking Age Sweden. According the original study one of those samples belongs to I-Z74 and my tests confirms that he was 25% Finnish. Taking into account the demographic history in Finland, he could have been fully Finnish too.

    Here a new article, unfortunately Google refuses to translate it, because it is probably protected by the publisher.

    https://www.hs.fi/kotimaa/art-2000005820485.html

    Edit

    Finland is on the second place in the list of genuine ULFBERHT's, Norway 44, Finland 31.
    Last edited by Lemminkäinen; 2018-09-09 at 12:49.
    Blog: http://terheninenmaa.blogspot.fi/, with essence "Believe me, or I'll nuke you".

    H39 - Thracia 1650 BC, Hungary 5000 BC
    I1 - Transdanubia 5000 BC

    Three simple facts about Finns:
    1. Baltic Finnic languages (including Finnish) never came from the Volga basin along with ancestors of present-day Finns.
    2. Finnish I1 (around 30% of all Finns) has Germanic roots from the late Bronze Age or the early Iron Age.
    3. As to the Finnish prehistory we have no evidences about any Iron Age (or later) east-to-west migration, but many unquestionable evidences about west-to-east migrations.

    Väinämöinen - R1a
    Lemminkäinen - I1
    Joukahainen - N

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Lemminkäinen For This Useful Post:

    alistair (2018-10-31), David Noi (2018-09-27)

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  4. #132
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    Race Realist Lemminkäinen's Avatar
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    I made a Google translation and fixed it a bit correcting odd words. Here is the translation of the article " Recent Viking sword finds in Finland" / Dr. Moilanen:

    Over the past few years, enormous thousands of Viking swords have been discovered in the country - founds even astonish at the doctoral archeology Mikko Moilanen who made a sword doctoral dissertation to learn the already forgotten skills of famous forging sabres.

    The treasure chest of the millennial Viking swords - such a thing has come from Finland, even though we are not a real Viking country.

    Over the past five years, the National Board of Antiquities has become aware of over 40 new discoveries of swords or sword parts of the Vikings.

    Amazingly abundant discoveries are underpinned by the popularity of metal detector hobbies. Sword finds are probably more likely, as no one knows how many swords have ended up in the amusement cabinets. By law, more than one hundred years old antiquities should be reported to the National Board of Antiquities or the Provincial Museum.

    Most swords of the Viking Age - more than 2,000 - have been found in Norway. Sweden has made Viking swords 600-700. The third is then Finland.

    "We have found more than 400 swords, and the number of finds is growing all the time. It only ponders what it is. If the number of finds is increasing this momentum, you could imagine that the point is going to be in Swedish readings. Yes, the swords will be found. it is still safe to say" says Dr. Mikko Moilanen, archaeologist.

    But how many swords have been found in Finland, it is surprising to Moilanen. Finland when there were no real Vikings, and there has not been a systematic launch of a trade or robbery trip here.

    "Finland has had prosperity. There are still rich digs without digging. It has acquired expensive items and has thus shown prosperity, "he says.

    "There are a huge number of swords in Finland with texts of plain gibberish and their quality is questionable. One could imagine that pirated products have been made here or in neighboring countries. "

    Moilanen is an archaeologist who graduated from the University of Turku, who is familiar with experimental archeology. He claimed during the year that he was making the swords of the Viking Age.

    He is annoyed that the Finns do not yet know closer to the ancient Viking time.

    "The Viking era was not semi-molten bronze objects and rusted iron, but that was more."

    The Finnish era of Vikings was, in his view, more prosperous and interesting than the old texts allow us to understand.

    "In old popular books, it is written that it was a little dim and poor time. It is not known for its own. Schools do not have much to do with the Viking Time, and museums have not been specifically emphasized in the past, "Moilanen says.

    In recent years, however, there has been little change, which is a good example of the swordsmanship ordered by museums.

    With stories and sagas, the Viking sword has become an almost mythical weapon. With regard to that, it is surprising how little of them are known. There is not even one single workshop that would have made Viking swords.

    The swords of the Viking Age have survived well because of the fact that in Finland there was a burial of bodies. Most of the swords have been found in combustion areas, where withe deceased, his wardrobe and his weapon were placed in.

    Swords found in combustion graves are usually bent or twisted. The reason for this is unclear.

    "Perhaps it was feared that the deceased would use them alive or thought that they should follow the deceased in the same form, broken, on the latter."

    Vikings can be somewhat misleading as the concept of Viking swords has spread all over Europe. The Viking Age was resumed in the period 800-1050.

    It has been argued that the source of the original Viking swords would be in the Frankish kingdom, because the famous swords were written in Roman characters. The Frankish kingdom consisted of large areas of existing Germany, France, the Netherlands and Italy.

    The most legendary viking words are the so-called Ulfberht swords. For some of them, a version of the word + ULFBERHT + has been forged from the template.

    Only around 170 Ulfberht swords have been preserved throughout Europe. Of these, 44 have been found in Norway. The second most Ulfberhte has been found in Finland, where they are known for 31 tracks.

    The significance of the word Ulfberht is uncertain. It is suspected that it was originally the name of some master. There is also the theory that cross-shaped signs would refer, for example, to a monastery.

    Sabre texts are known several. One of the known is INGELRII. Less than 40 Ingelrii swords are known in Europe. Five of them have been found in Finland.


    In his doctoral dissertation, Moilanen mapped out how much in Finland there are swords containing sabre texts and can it be identified where they are made. Is it true that they are from a few Frankish masterpieces? For the purpose of research, he made as many as 13 sword sabres.

    The result of the study was that the swords could be done with simple tools anywhere. Also in Finland.

    His main job Mikko Moilanen works as a molds at a Lahti foundry. Archeologists have little work and some must live, he says.

    As a side-occupation, he prepares the restoration of Viking swords for museums and individuals. He has learned the embossing and forging of patterns in Viking Viking sword sabres. Its part of skills in the world just a few blacksmiths can do.

    "Knowledge about traditional crafts has long disappeared. Very few people know about it anymore. "

    The wall of the Orimattilian detached house's living room is Moilanen's own swords.

    In the yard there is a large apple tree and a small barn building for the construction of a workshop. The place of forge is still under drafting.

    His first sword, made at the age of 12, hangs on the wall of the incoming workshop. On the tables are tools and iron pieces, and the floor border with a bunch of old forge tongs. Some of them have been donated by Lauko Manor. Moilanen has manufactured a restored sword and spearhead in Laukko.

    The restoration of a single decorated Viking sword, ie making a new sword according to the original sword model, will take five weeks. Faster can't go if it is more demanding work than usual.

    Precise Exercise Before forging the Sword: The sword is examined by a microscope and taken X-rays to see possible patterns, signs and writings.

    For the sword, "old iron" is also needed. Modern industrial iron is too hard and does not look right. Industrial steel is of a high quality. Moilanen almost literally forges old plows into the swords.

    "Now even the potential materials are out of stock. Should go for something to look for. When you do sabre texts, not one kicksled skid is enough, because the blank must be much thicker than the ready sword. "

    Especially sword decorations take time. Silver, copper and brass wires are embellished and embedded in the knob and hilt.

    "It requires nerves and long-lasting power. Work must be divided into several days and sometimes even weeks. "

    Below is a picture of the restoration of the Jämsä's sword and the original discovery ordered by the Museum of Central Finland. The story continues after the pictures.

    Moilanen's smith skills runs in the fasmily. He has two uncles working as smiths and as a schoolboy he excited about their work.

    "Maybe that interest was wobbly when there was a lot going on there. It was a bit of mysterious circumstances because the workshop was made of a smoke sauna. They knew what they were doing, everything great, "Moilanen recalls.

    Moilanen wrote his dissertation in English. He decided to write a popular version of the Finnish language after the people began to inquire about the Finnish version of the dissertation.

    In the late summer, the Finnish Literary Society published the book Viikinkimiekat in Finland.

    The book was so ready in her mind that she wrote only "couple of nights in the week".

    What would be a dream setting you would like to hear?

    "Yes, that would be one of the finest discovery in Finland," Moilanen ponders for a moment.

    "That would try something that others have not succeeded in. Maybe the sword of Vehmaa. That would is a real challenge. Foreign smiths have tried to do it more or less successfully. "
    Last edited by Lemminkäinen; 2018-11-07 at 13:58.
    Blog: http://terheninenmaa.blogspot.fi/, with essence "Believe me, or I'll nuke you".

    H39 - Thracia 1650 BC, Hungary 5000 BC
    I1 - Transdanubia 5000 BC

    Three simple facts about Finns:
    1. Baltic Finnic languages (including Finnish) never came from the Volga basin along with ancestors of present-day Finns.
    2. Finnish I1 (around 30% of all Finns) has Germanic roots from the late Bronze Age or the early Iron Age.
    3. As to the Finnish prehistory we have no evidences about any Iron Age (or later) east-to-west migration, but many unquestionable evidences about west-to-east migrations.

    Väinämöinen - R1a
    Lemminkäinen - I1
    Joukahainen - N

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Lemminkäinen For This Useful Post:

    MnM (2018-11-07)

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