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Thread: The ancient Egyptian/Nile Valley Origins of Bantu Speakers2062 days old

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    Default The ancient Egyptian/Nile Valley Origins of Bantu Speakers

    Contrary to the popular belief that Bantus speakers of Southern, Central and Eastern Africa originated in modern day Cameroon or West Africa, most if not all Bantu and Niger-Congo speakers (Western Africa) have an oral tradition which maintains that they came from the North (in the case Bantu speakers) and that they came from the East/Nile Valley (West Africans). Here is an interesting article on the evidence suggesting this in the case of the Bantu Speakers:



    BATU, THE BANTU

    For the first time ever the set of hieroglyphics above leaves an indelible print which traces back the existence of the Bantu people during ancient times in the Sudan and Egypt. The following variations in pronunciation of the word 'Bantu' give an insight on how the word may have been pronounced in different Bantu languages. The list of the various pronunciations was provided by Israel Ntangazwa. Some of the variations in pronunciation are new to me.

    SOME VARIATIONS IN PRONUNCIATION OF THE WORD
    'BANTU' THE PEOPLE
    BANTU, BATU, ATHO, WATU, ATU,
    ACHO, BOT, BANU, BANHU, ADU

    The hieroglyphics shown above spells out the word 'BATU' in keeping with the current original word 'BANTU'. The maps shown below trace the possible migrations of the Bantu people. The origin of the Bantu people is a controversial issue and has been deeply debated.

    Below is an account which questions present day ideas about the origins of the Bantu people. In his book on the 'Restatement Of Bantu Origin and Meru History' the Kenyan scholar Alfred M M'Imanyara provides the evidence for a southerly migration from Egypt of the Bantu people.

    THE NIGER- CONGO HYPOTHESIS
    The Niger-Congo hypothesis developed by Joseph Greenberg on Bantu languages state that the Bantu originated in West Africa, the Cameroon, and migrated across the the Congo basin into Southern and East Africa.
    Guthrie on the other hand did not commit himself but said that the Bantu dispersal lies within an elliptical area towards the centre, in the woodland region of Katanga.

    The Niger-Congo hypothesis needs to be re-examined further as one has to take into account oral traditions from groups of present day Kenyan Bantu elders who recall a southerly migration from Egypt.
    The following sources of accounts of migrations of some of the Bantu speakers in Kenya are taken from:

    i) Kenya an official handbook
    ii) Story of Africa from earliest times, Book one, A.J Willis
    iii) Longman GHC, E.S Atieno Odhimbo, John N. B. N. I Were

    Almost all the Bantu people living in Kenya speak of a migration from up North. The people of Marachi location are known to have come from Elgon although other clans of the same group came from Egypt. They came in canoes on the River Nile as far as Juja, Uganda and later moved eastward into lake Victoria. They changed course until Asembo and separated with the Luo who walked along the lake shore but the rest crossed into South Nyanza. They then turned northwards and reached Butere and then moved on to Luanda and to Ekhomo. The Luo people were behind them right from Egypt.

    The people of Samia location came from Egypt on foot. The Abakhekhe clan too originated from Egypt on foot. The Abachoni clan originally came from Egypt on foot. The people of Bukusu originally came from Egypt in canoes.

    Possible migration routes of Bantu from Central Sudan


    The following article is from Wikipidia and lists some Bantu people who came from Egypt:

    The Luhya oral literature of origin, suggest a migration into their present-day locations from the north. Virtually all sub-ethnic groups claim to have migrated first south from Misri, or Egypt. In one of the Luhya dialect the word 'Abaluhya' means 'the people of the North', or 'Northerns'

    Other sources report that the following Bantu people, the Luhya, Baganda, Nyarwanda, Rundi of Burindi, Kikuyu, and the Zulu all claim a southerly migration from Egypt. Moreover there are many groups of Bantu speakers from Tanzania, Mozambique, Congo, Zambia, Malawi, South Africa, who testify a southerly migration from Egypt. There are even groups of people from West Africa who migrated from Egypt into their present day location.

    Apart from the oral traditions provided by Bantu elders, the evidence is also based on linguistic, historical, scientific and cultural studies done by Cheikh Anta Diop.

    The following maps are taken from Alfred M M'Imanyara 'The Restatement of Bantu Origin and Meru History' published by Longman Kenya,

    According to Alfred M M'Imanyra the following maps show the homeland of the original Bantu people in Egypt. This careful information has been derived from traditional sources provided by Bantu elders in the course of his research. I would like to support Alfred M M'Imanyara's work by sharing with him the important discovery of the of hieroglyphics above which mentions a Sudanic town of unknown situation. Clearly the town would have to be named after the people inhabiting the town, the 'BANTU' orthe 'BATU', the people.

    Original homeland of the Bantu up to 1500 A.D
    Dark shading: Possible ultimate origin of the Bantu
    Cross shading: Area of Bantu expansion into Egypt


    Bantu Migration Routes from Cush and the Island of Meroe


    Migration of the Bantu


    Note: The settlements of the Bantu in West Africa may have been a result of two streams of Bantu emigrants: one from the Congo basin and the other directly from the Nile valley which is confirmed by the genetic maps below.

    The origins and spread of M2 (the most common genetic marker in equatorial Africa).



    Now given the information above this map now becomes very interesting. Notice how the Nile Valley and particularly around middle/southern Sudan and middle Egypt is the most noticeable abnormality on the map for their complete absence of E1b1a unlike the rest of Africa. This is same region where the Bantu Homeland and expansion is proposed by scholars decades before the heavy use of genetics.



    Of course we also know about the recent genetic analysis of two separate New Kingdom families. This first one is King Tut's family (Amarna):



    Geographical analysis of the Amarna mummies was performed using their autosomal STR profiles based on 8 tested loci.Results are summarized in Table 1 and illustrated in Figure 1. Maps for individual Amarna mummies are included in Figures 2-8 in the Appendix.

    Discussion: Average MLI scores in Table 1 indicate the STR profiles of the Amarna mummies would be most frequent in present day populations of several African regions: including the Southern African (average MLI 326.94), African Great Lakes (average MLI 323.76), and Tropical West African (average MLI 83.74) regions. These regional matches do not necessarily indicate an exclusively African ancestry for the Amarna pharaonic family. However, results indicate these ancient individuals inherited some alleles that today are more frequent in populations of Africa than in other parts of the world (such as D18S51=19 and D21S11=34).
    link

    Ramses III and his son

    We amplified 16 Y chromosomal, short tandem repeats (AmpF\STR Yfiler PCR amplification kit; Applied Biosystems).........Genetic kinship analyses revealed identical haplotypes in both mummies (table 1⇓); using the Whit Athey’s haplogroup predictor, we determined the Y chromosomal haplogroup E1b1a
    link

    DNAtribes follow up.

    These results indicate that both Ramesses III and Unknown Man E (possibly his son Pentawer) shared an ancestral component with present day populations of Sub-Saharan Africa..A previous issue of DNA Tribes Digest identified African related ancestry for King Tut and other royal mummies from the Amarna Period. In this issue, results indicate that the later pharaoh Ramesses III also inherited alleles that are most frequent in present day populations of Sub-Saharan Africa. This provides additional, independent evidence of Sub-Saharan African ancestry (possibly among several ancestral components) for pharaonic families of ancient Egypt....In addition, these DNA match results in present day world regions might in part express population changes in Africa after the time of Ramesses III. In particular, DNA matches in present day populations of Southern Africa and the African Great Lakes might to some degree reflect genetic links with ancient populations (formerly living closer to New Kingdom Egypt) that have expanded southwards in the Nilotic and Bantu migrations of the past 3,000 years (see Figure 1)


    link

    and of course anthropological/archaeological evidence points to this as well:

    On this basis, many have postulated that the Badarians are relatives to South African populations (Morant, 1935 G. Morant, A study of predynastic Egyptian skulls from Badari based on measurements taken by Miss BN Stoessiger and Professor DE Derry, Biometrika 27 (1935), pp. 293–309.Morant, 1935; Mukherjee et al., 1955; Irish and Konigsberg, 2007). The archaeological evidence points to this relationship as well. (Hassan, 1986) and (Hassan, 1988) noted similarities between Badarian pottery and the Neolithic Khartoum type, indicating an archaeological affinity among Badarians and Africans from more southern regions. Furthermore, like the Badarians, Naqada has also been classified with other African groups, namely the Teita (Crichton, 1996; Keita, 1990).

    Nutter (1958) noted affinities between the Badarian and Naqada samples, a feature that Strouhal (1971) attributed to their skulls possessing “Negroid” traits. Keita (1992), using craniometrics, discovered that the Badarian series is distinctly different from the later Egyptian series, a conclusion that is mostly confirmed here. In the current analysis, the Badari sample more closely clusters with the Naqada sample and the Kerma sample. However, it also groups with the later pooled sample from Dynasties XVIII–XXV. -- Godde K. (2009) An Examination of Nubian and Egyptian biological distances: Support for biological diffusion or in situ development? Homo. 2009;60(5):389-404.
    Holiday's new study of course found the ancient Egyptians to once again be tropically adapted black Africans:



    but also noted the phenetic affinities between equatorial African types as opposed to contemporary populations in the Sudan.

    "In contrast, Irish and Turner (1990) and Irish (2000, 2005) noted that Pleistocene Nubians (in particular those of Jebel Sahaba skeletons) were as a group quite different from recent Nubians for dental discreet traits yet shared great phenetic affinity with recent West African populations." -- T.W. Holiday 2013 ("Population Affinities of the Jebel Sahaba Skeletal Sample")
    - - - Updated - - -

    Here are a few random cultural, religious, and linguistic similarities that between the ancient Egyptians and their descendants scattered throughout tropical Africa:

    Ramses II and Tutsi





    Top image shows the Fon art on the left hand side, which is reminiscent in its theme, of the ancient Egyptian wall relief of Rameses smiting an enemy on the right hand side. Bottom image shows another example of parallels between west Sahelian/Sub-Saharan art [likely Benin carving] — sporting the head of some carnivorous creature [likely a feline of some sort] on the left hand side, and two ancient Egyptian figurines — one sporting a falcon head, and the other, a feline; what stands out here, is the remarkably similar standing postures, particularly what they are doing with their arms and hands.





    In Togo, Benin and Nigeria, the Kutito (among Gbe speaking people) and Egungun (among Yoruba speaking people) are masked dancing ancestors returning to earth to help and punish living people. Jean Charles Coovi Gomez pointed out that this ceremony was exactly the same as what we know of Kemetic "raising the Djed Pillar Ceremony".Egungun ,the Yoruba name of the ceremony means "bone, skeleton". In Kmt, the Djed pillar was considered as the backbone of the neter Ausar. There is ample evidence for mummification in traditional Africa. Félix Dubois reported it among Songhoi people, M.Delafosse among Baule(Akan) people of Ivory Coast, A.M.L Desplagnes among the Dogon and Mossi, J.C.C.Gomez among the Yoruba.

    Mummy of the Obi Ijeh of Idumuoghu,Ibusa, Nigeria From Oscar Pfouma "Histoire culturelle de l'Afrique Noire":







    On the top, is an ancient Egyptian "paddle" doll, courtesy of the British Museum; in the middle, we have Ashanti examples of the fertility doll, and third image is yet another example of fertility dolls common amongst the Akan.

    Fertility dolls are a fairly common theme in Africa, from the Akan speaking groups of Ghana to the Donguena, Evale, Hakawama, Himba, Humbe, Kwanyama, Mukubal, Mwila, Ndimba, Ngambwe, Ovambo and Zemba people of the semi-desert areas of Angola for example, and it appear that the ancient Egyptians were no different in this aspect.

    A little trivia on the Egyptian "paddle doll"...

    Such dolls are usually found in Upper Egypt and Nubia. When complete they have faces and hair of clay. Hair may also be of faience beads. This one is missing its hair. A number have been found dating to the second half of the 11th Dynasty from tombs in the neighbourhood of Deir el Bahri and are common at Thebes. However, at least two have been found in earlier tombs at Beni Hasan and one at Rifeh. Another was found beneath the Ramesseum at Thebes dating to the 13th Dynasty (Bourriau 1988, 126-127). Most are of 11th Dynasty to Middle Kingdom.

    The marks on the body are thought to be tattoos or scarification and the end of the paddle, it has been suggested is an exaggerated pubic area. That such dolls are found mainly in female graves has led Egyptologists to suggest that these are fertility figurines put in graves to ensure fertility in the afterlife. - Courtesy of SWANSEA UNIVERSITY.




    More Links this time in the form of serekhs in both cases by an object or an animal and while the Kemetic symbols developed into a full writing system where the name could be read,the Beninese kings used theirs as a memory device.



    Prince Gagni Xesu (1620) is symbolised by a bird and a drum.


    Dyn 0 Kemet King Scorpion.


    King Hwegbeadja (1645–1680) is represented by a fish and a fyke net.


    The ancient Nok civilization of Nigeria


    The Nok culture of northern Nigeria, a civilization that existed from approximately 500 B.C. to about 500 A.D., is principally known for its terracotta figures. Relatively little is known about the purpose of these figures or the civilization that created such extraordinary sculptural representations of its people. A few of the remarkable characteristics that distinguish Nok pieces from terracottas of later cultures in Nigeria include the triangular, pierced eyes; the elaborate coiffure and beard; and the placement of the ears. This work depicts a person of high status wearing elaborate beaded jewelry, and with a crooked baton on his right arm and a hinged flail on the left. These are symbols of authority also found in ancient Egyptian depictions of the Pharaohs and the god Osiris. The Nok culture existed during the late Pharonic period and intra-African trading could have spread Egyptian influences into many other parts of Africa.

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    The Great Sphinx


    Old Kingdom Pharaohs

    Menes-Narmer (First King of Egypt)









    unnamed Old Kingdom Pharaoh

    The ancient Egyptian Supreme God Osiris


    - - - Updated - - -

    Let's look at some Yoruba (Nigeria) Connections:

    Yoruba Child of Obatala


    Ancient Egyptian Twa (Pygmie) God Bes


    Kongo Twa God



    The first one is a sculpture of a Yoruba figure called a Child of Obatala. Obatala is a Yoruba god. And the second one is the Egyptian god Bes. the third one is from the Kongo And all three are wearing a skull necklace.

    The God Bes is connected to the Ba-Twa commonly known as Pygmies they were brought to Kush and Kemet to do the dances of the Gods,this pre-supposed some ancestral connections with that area especially when we factor in the Mountains of the moon and the source of the Nile



    Some interesting pectorals, from the Nile Valley and sub-Saharan west Africa. In this case, we have pectorals sporting ram heads, demonstrating remarkable parallelism; the examples here, include one from ancient Egypt and Nigeria (?). The ancient Egyptian example is obvious on the top right hand side, sporting a ram head with a sun disc.

    Here are some Yoruba words which are rooted in ancient Egyptian:

    EGYPT YORUBA
    1. Wu (rise) Wu (rise)
    2. Ausa (Osiris, father of the gods) Ausa (father)
    3. Ere (python/ Serpent) Ere (Python / Serpent)
    4. Horise (a great god) Orise (a great god)
    5. Sen (group of worshippers) Sen ( to worship)
    6. Ged (to chant0 Igede (a chant)
    7. Ta (sell / offer) Ta (sell/offer)
    8. Sueg (a fool) Suegbe (a fool)
    9. On ( living person) One ( living person)
    10. Kum (a club) Kumo( a club)
    11. Enru (fear / terrible) Eru (fear / terrible
    12. Kun / qun (brave man) Ekun (title of a brave man)
    13. Win (to be) Wino (to be)
    14. Odonit (festival) Odon (festival)
    15. Ma or mi (to breath) Mi. (to breathe)
    16. Tebu (a town) Tebu (a town)
    17. Adumu (a water god) Adumu (a water god)
    18. Khu (to kill) Ku (die)
    19. Rekha (knowledge} Larikha (knowledge)
    20 Hika (evil) Ika (evil)
    21 Mhebi (humble) Mebi, humble to ones family
    22 Sata (perfect) Santan (perfect)
    23 Unas (lake of fire) Una (fire)
    24 Tan (complete) Tan (complete)
    25 Beru (force of emotion) Beru (fear)
    26 Em (smell) Emi (smell)
    27 Pa (open) Pa (break open)
    28 Bi (to become) Bi (to give birth, to become)
    29 Hepi (a water god) Ipi (a water god)
    30 Sami (water god) Sami (a water god)
    31 Osiri (a water god) Oshiri (a water god)
    32 Heqet – Re (frog deity) Ekere (the frog)
    33 Feh (to go away) Feh (to blow away)
    34 Kot (build) Ko (build)
    35 Kot (boat) Oko (boat)
    36 Omi (water) Omi (water)
    37 Ra (time) Ira (time)
    38 Oni (title of Osiris) Oni (title of the king of Ife)
    39 Budo (dwelling place) Budo (dwelling place)
    40 Dudu (black image of Osiris) Dudu (black person)
    41 Un (living person) Una (living person)
    42 Ra (possess) Ra (possess/buy)
    43 Beka (pray/confess) Be or ka (to pray or confess)
    44 Po (many) Po (many/cheap)
    45 Horuw (head) middle Egyptian Oruwo (head) (Ijebu)
    46 Min (a god) Emin (spirit)
    47 Ash (invocation) Ashe (invocation)
    48 Aru (mouth) Arun (mouth ) Ilaje
    49 Do (river) Odo (river)
    50 Do (settlement) Udo (settlement)
    51 Shekiri (water god) Shekiri (a water god)
    52 Bu (a place) Bu ,a place
    53 Khepara (beetle Akpakara (beetle)
    54 No (a water god Eno (a water god)
    55 Ra -Shu (light after darkness Uran-shu (the light of the moon
    56 Run-ka (spirit name) Oruko (name)
    57 Deb/dib to pierce Dibi (to pierce)
    58 Maat (goddess of justice Mate (goddess of justice)
    59 Aru (rise) Ru (rise up)
    60 Fa (carry) Fa (pull)
    61 Kaf (pluck) Ka (pluck)
    62 Bu bi (evil place) Bubi (evil place)
    63 In- n (negation In-n (negation)
    64 Iset (a water god) Ise (a water god)
    65 Shabu (watcher) Ashonbo (watcher)
    66 Semati (door keeper) Sema (lock/shut the door)
    67 Khenti amenti (big words of Osiris Yenti – yenti (big, very big)
    68 Ma (to know) Ma (to know)
    69 Bebi, a son of osiris) Ube, a god
    70 Tchatcha chief (they examined the death to see if they tricked tsatsa (a game of tricks, gambling )
    71 Ren( animal foot) Ren (to walk)
    72 Ka (rest) Ka (rest/tired)
    73 Mu (water) Mu (drink water)
    74 Abi (against) Ubi (against / impediment)
    75 Reti (to beseech) Retin (to listen)
    76 Hir (praise) Yiri (praise)
    77 Ta(spread out) Ta (spread out)
    78 Kurud (round) Kurudu (round)
    79 Ak – male Ako (male)
    80 Se – to create Se (to create)
    81 Hoo (rejoice) Yo (rejoice)
    82 Kamwr (black) Kuru (extremely black
    83 Omitjener (deep water) Omijen (deep water)
    84 Nen, the primeval water mother) Nene (mother
    85 Ta (land) Ita (land junction)
    86 Horiwo (head) Oriwo (head)
    87 Ro (talk) Ro (to think)
    88 Kurubu (round) Kurubu (deep and round)
    89 Penka (divide) Kpen (divide)
    90 Ma-su (to mould) Ma or su (to mould)
    91 Osa (time) Osa (time)
    92 Osa (tide) Osa ( tide)
    93 Fare (wrap) Fari (wrap)
    94 Kom (complete) Kon (complete)
    95 Edjo (cobra) Edjo (cobra)
    96 Didi (red fruit) Diden (red)
    97 Ba (soul) Oba (king) soul of a people
    98 Ke (hill) Oke( hill
    99 Anubis (evil deity) Onubi (evil person)
    100 Kan (one: Middle Egyptian) Okan one)
    101 Nam (water god) Inama (water god)

    The Igbo Pyramids (Nigerian)




    Resembles Djoser's pyramid


    Common Ancient Egyptian head deformity also seen in Bantu Speakers


    Ancient Egyptians Afro Combs

    Ghanian/Ashanti combs


    Ivory Coast

    Angola

    Mozambique


    Afro hair:






    Other African hair types

    Sidelock



    Butter Melt





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    The Kalengen Oral traditions and connections:

    The Military Clan of Ancient Egypt:





    The Kalenjins of Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania had the role of defending Egypt,up to the time of Herodotus. When Herodotus visited Egypt during the 5th century BCE, he encountered a sub-nation of Egypt known as Sebenitus. Until the 40s, all Kalenjin were known by fourth names namely Sebei, Sabaot, Miot and Midian. Scholars from the community coined the word, Kalenjin, meaning I tell you to unite all the sub-nations of the tribe. Sebei and Sabaot now live around Mt. Elgon in Western Kenya and Eastern Uganda. It is possible that Herodotus misspelled the word, Sebenitus, which should have been either Sebei or Sabaot. Even the Bible confirms the presence of the Sebei (Kalenjin). Job 1:5 says "...and the Sabeans fell upon and took them away." Ezekiel also wrote about the Kalenjins (Sabeans), a sub-tribe of Ancient Egyptians. ze:23:42 says, "..and a voice of multitude being at ease was with her, and with the men of the common sort were brought Sabeans from the wilderness which put bracelets upon their hands and beautiful crowns upon their heads."


    When Herodotus asked the Sebenitus people about where their aboriginal home was, they told him is/was a place called Nttr-the holy land of the God in the south. With the Benefit of Kalenjin language, we can learn that Ntrr was actually Tororo Hills in Eastern Uganda. Tororo means the exalted one, the high hill or even God. Hence Ntrr should be netoror-the exalted one!


    According to their own accounts, the Kalenjin believe that their ancestors aboriginal home was here in Kenya at a place called Tororo Hills in Eastern Uganda. From here they migrated to Misiri or Egypt, where they stayed for thousands of years, and then migrated back again to Kenya. Some remained in Egypt. Others are in Ethiopia, Sudan, Eritrea and many other places around the world. However not all Old Egyptians (Kalenjin) left for Egypt. The Ogiek or Dorobo who speak Kalenjin do not recall having migrated from elsewhere. They say that they have been living in Kenya since time immemorial.

    In 2001, I interviewed some oldmen as to why they left Egypt. They told me that they left Egypt after being attacked by a mysterious people called Kipyayamungeen. They said these people were white. (The term, "white", is a relative term, which means lighter skin color.) They say this was during the reign of Pharaoh Kipcheum. According to Dr Sambu, about 250,000 warriors left Egypt for East Africa as a result of this invasion. This event coincides with the first Persian invasion of Egypt, which occurred about 525 BCE.

    Because the Kalenjin tongue is basically a dialect of the Egyptian language, many Egyptian words and names are recognizable by the Kalenjin peoples, such as:

    For thousands of years, Egypt was known to the entire ancient world as Kagypta, meaning the sanctuary of Pta. Pta, now known as Kiptaiyat in modern Kalenjin language, was the deity of Memphis. When the Greeks came to Egypt about 2500 years ago, they could not pronounce the word Kagypta. Instead, they pronounced it as Aigyptos or Aegyptus. They also referred to people of Egypt as Kiptaios (see the word Kiptaiyaat above!).

    The word, kmt, which the Egyptians referred to as their country, is also traceable to the Kalenjin tongue. Kemet in Kalenjin means country. Some other Egyptians called their country Khemet, which historians used to coin the word Hamites.

    Pharaoh in Kalenjin language means a massively built house, a leader or president. In fact, Pharaoh should be written as Parao, from the words Para (meaning big or vast) and ooh or woor, meaning the big one. Parao should mean the leader of the entire nation. I say it should be Parao because the English word Empire is derived from it. Em in Kalenjin and Ancient Egyptian means country, while para or pire means wide, big or vast. Hence, the Europeans coined the word Empire and its derivatives from the word Parao or Pharaoh! The Kalenjin people have produced some of the Egyptian Pharaohs.

    Pharaoh Amasis in Kalenjin may mean the one loved by God, the one who loves God, the one who eats God or the one who is eaten by God. Am in Kalenjin means eat, while Asista means the sun. There are many other examples.

    The Kalenjin say that upon arrival in east Africa, they circumcised their boys in two places. They circumcised their boys near Mt Elgon at a hill called tulwop Kabiniet (ie the hill of Phallus).Around 1500 CE they circumcised their boys again at a hill called Tulwop Monyiseet (ie the hill of the foreskins). It is interesting to note that like their ancestors in Egypt, the Kalenjins gave functionally descriptive names to hills where circumcision rites have been performed. Remember God telling Jushua to circumcise his boys again in the hill of the foreskins (Joshua 5;3) in Gilgal area. Again the Kalenjin say that their ancestors used to circumcise their boys in Gilgil area which is 100 km west of nairobi. Gilgil is a corruption of Gilgal, which is the military base of the Kenyan Army.


    Kalenjin Dieties


    Like, Old Egyptians, Kalenjin was a monotheistic society. They believe in one God who has so many names. Asis is the deity of the Kalejin. This is Isis. Asis or Aset among the Barabaig of Tanzania was believed to be a woman. Other names we brought from Egypt include Illat-the God of Justice. Some other people later corrupted to Allah or Illay among the Somalis of Kenya and Ethiopia. Chebo-Amoni is another name of our deity which the Greeks corrupted to Amoni. The Kalenjin word osirun means to resurrect, to wake up from sleep or to cross a bridge. Apeso is also the name of our Deity, known as Apis.

    The Kalenjin used to refer to themselves as children of Miot or Myoot, known in Ancient Egypt as Ma-at, another deity of Old Egyptians.

    Kalenjin and Moses

    The Bible tells us that Moses married a lady from Midian people known as Zipporah. I am now convinced that Moses was a Kalenjin since Moso in our language means a child. Moses was said to have been a child rescued somewhere in Egypt. We have songs about Moses in kalnjin. After circumcising our girls, we sing a song called, Ndomo rireet ab Mugaika koto mokimi emoni, ie if it were not for the sea of Musaiga (Moses) we would be dead. The story about Moses crossing the sea with his people is common among many tribes in Kenya and Southern Africa. This confirms that Moses was an Egyptian. Midian is a clan of the Kalenjins of Baringo district of Kenya.

    Kalenjin and Sabeans

    Sebenitus also refers to the people known as Sabeans. In fact it was the Sabeans of South Arabia who established the first civilization in the Arabian peninsula-thousands of years before the emergence of the Bedouin Arabs. Through the Sabeans (Kalenjin) link, it is not difficult to explain the presence of Old Egyptians from remote antiquity, in the Malayan Peninsula, Indo-China, and the heavy concentration of Old Egyptians in India, the Angkor and Champa in Southeast Asia, the vast populations of the dark-skinned peoples in Southern China as far as Japan's Ainu people.


    It can be seen in retrospect that the Kalenjins are Old Egyptians what with more information coming to this site from me.


    Kalenjin history should now be rewritten by its free natives (and not by the colonial powers of European academia), and its great past reconciled with that of other Old Egyptians around the world.


    WELDON arap KIRUI, NAIROBI, KENYA

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    Yes there was a Black African influence/presence in Ancient Egypt and trade and mutual influences certainly happened. Did Bantu-speakers originate in Egypt? Naaaaahh I'm sorry oral history and superficial cultural similarities won't cut it for me. As a proud person of West-African descent I actually feel somewhat insulted by the notion that my ancestors supposedly came from Egypt. especially since there are many developments in which West-Africa was actually ahead of Ancient Egypt.

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    Ok so where are my post?

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    Dogon (Mali)

    One of the most of famous ethnic groups in Africa are the Dogon. Their extensively detailed knowledge of astronomy cannot be explained by contemporary Western scientist. None the less the Dogon claim their origins as the descendants of exiled ancient Egyptian priest:






    The Dogon sign "gono" or "gonono", written at the end of the Sigi Time (sixty years) and identical to the Egyptian "ânkh" represents God after he created the world. Ancient Egyptians also celebrated, each sixty years, a ceremony called "hn" representing the renewing of the world. The osirian rite Sâh and the Dogon Sigi are isomorphic. The relationship between AE and modern Black Africa is irrefutable.

    Dogon gonono:"a 60 years time"
    Egypt hnn:"a 60 years time"(Budge)
    Dogon Sigi
    Egypt sâh
    Dogon Naporo=Osiris
    Egypt Npr=Osiris(E.Naville)

    The Egyptian word for deity but also pharaoh, Ntr is also found in modern BA languages as thus:

    Coptic:Noyte, Nute
    Gurma:Unteru(god)
    Gurmantche:"Untenu"(god)
    Fulani:"Ntori"(god)
    Masai:"Naiteru"(god)
    Kwasio:"Nture"(sacred)
    Mombutu:"Nôro"(god)

    Voodoo Origins

    4th century BC Egypt:


    Kongo Minkisi

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    Nursing
    Kemetian art, like any other, speaks for itself. For instance, Kemetian art had certain features that were similar to that of other ancient African culture. You'll see what I mean...



    Nursing Woman. From Giza: 5th Dynasty (ca. 2420-2389 B.C.E). Limestone with remains of paint. (courtesy of metmuseum)



    Akan [Ghana] wood carving of a female breast-feeding a young one; not unlike the theme being communicated in the ancient Egyptian rendition above.

    Parallels in color conventions
    The ancient Egyptians were not the only ones to depict their fellow dark skin African neighbours in dual contrasting tones; the following image shows a conflict between the Fon warriors and their Yoruba counterparts. Both of these groups would generally be seen as dark skin peoples, but from the image below, this might not be immediately apparent to anyone unfamiliar with these peoples...



    Old-Middle Kingdom-New Kingdom (in order) Pharaohs cont.



















    The Great

    D-wades Great (x1000) Granddaddy

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    The Depictions of the ancient Egyptians that famed Egyptologist Frank Yurco deliberately misinterpreted in his book as representing Nubians when the Egyptian text indicates that this was the ancient Egyptian type:






    In all of these depictions these black Africans typically labled by silly people as the "true negro" depicted as the general representation of ancient Egypt. Here is a first hand account how dishonest and stubborn he was about the race and appearance of the ancient Egyptians. Even when confronted about his dishonesty his silliness would not yield.

    ‘In 1998, after reading Yurco’s “Two Tomb-Wall Painted Reliefs of Rameses III and Sety I and Ancient Nile Valley Population Diversity” in which he proclaimed that the “four races of man” pastiche used by many African-centred writers to demonstrate that the ancient Egyptians viewed themselves as a black people, is based on a nineteenth century copy that is incorrect, I informed Yurco that not only had I been in the tomb of Ramesses III but that I personally photographed the wall painting. He seemed somewhat surprised at the time. I invited him to view the photos at a training session for volunteers that I was conducting the following day at the Field Museum of Natural History . He did not show. Although we would occasionally see one another at the museum , nothing more was said about his article or my photographs, that is until the museum conducted another volunteer training session for the new Cleopatra exhibit which opened in October 2001. I saw Yurco at the first session and decided then and there that I would give him a copy of “The Unwrapping of Egyptology”, which was first published in the Kemetic Voice in 1999. The following week I did just that. I personally handed him a copy of the Kemetic Voice and asked him to read the article and to give me feedback. Amiably, he agreed. However, he did not show for the final training session. I do not know whether my article had anything to do with his absence, but I was reminded of the first time I tried to present him with this information in 1998. Finally an opportunity presented itself during a walk-through of the Cleopatra exhibit. As I stood near the exit of the exhibit, I saw Yurco explaining certain aspects of the exhibit to a group of volunteers. I positioned myself so that it was virtually impossible for him to pass without seeing me. To my amazement, Yurco scurried right past me without uttering one word. I literally ran after him. Fortunately, there were two other members of the Kemetic Institute present to witness this encounter. When I caught Yurco and asked him what he thought about the article, the first thing he said was “I still maintain that it is a pastiche.” It was obvious from his statement that he had read the article. I again agreed with him on that point and pressed him further with regard to the contents of the pastiche and my photographs. In other words, were the ancient Egyptians as depicted in the tomb of Ramesses III shown in the same skin colour and dress as the Ku****es? Still walking hurriedly and looking quite ill at ease Yurco finally conceded that the depiction of the ancient Egyptians in the tomb of Ramesses III shows them to have the same black skin colour and dress as the Ku****es. When asked if this was a valid representation of the ancient Egyptians, Yurco again conceded. (p34).'The Battle for Kemet' Charles A.Grantham

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    On this basis, many have postulated that the Badarians are relatives to South African populations (Morant, 1935 G. Morant, A study of predynastic Egyptian skulls from Badari based on measurements taken by Miss BN Stoessiger and Professor DE Derry, Biometrika 27 (1935), pp. 293–309.Morant, 1935; Mukherjee et al., 1955; Irish and Konigsberg, 2007). The archaeological evidence points to this relationship as well. (Hassan, 1986) and (Hassan, 1988) noted similarities between Badarian pottery and the Neolithic Khartoum type, indicating an archaeological affinity among Badarians and Africans from more southern regions. Furthermore, like the Badarians, Naqada has also been classified with other African groups, namely the Teita (Crichton, 1996; Keita, 1990).

    Nutter (1958) noted affinities between the Badarian and Naqada samples, a feature that Strouhal (1971) attributed to their skulls possessing “Negroid” traits. Keita (1992), using craniometrics, discovered that the Badarian series is distinctly different from the later Egyptian series, a conclusion that is mostly confirmed here. In the current analysis, the Badari sample more closely clusters with the Naqada sample and the Kerma sample. However, it also groups with the later pooled sample from Dynasties XVIII–XXV. -- Godde K. (2009) An Examination of Nubian and Egyptian biological distances: Support for biological diffusion or in situ development? Homo. 2009;60(5):389-404.
    10,000 years ago the Sahara was a humid/sub-humid lush savannah environment. From 5,000 - 3000 BC the area witnessed desertification, with waning humidity. If you look at nasal indexes of skeletons from Badari, through to Naqada and proto-dynastic, you will see a continuous decrease (i.e. nasal narrowing). This is because the inhabitants were adapting to the aridification. Morant (1935), Strouhal (1971) etc., are all outdated typological studies that did not take into account this climatic selection. Broader nosed "Negroid" looking Badarian skeletons didn't require wandering Sub-Saharan Africans to give them those features.

    The "southern" archaeological connections to prehistoric Egypt were just neighbors (Khartoum etc). No one denies though small scale movements into the region from more distant places but the whole "Egyptians = Bantu" theory is nonsense.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fact-Finder View Post
    Yes there was a Black African influence/presence in Ancient Egypt and trade and mutual influences certainly happened. Did Bantu-speakers originate in Egypt? Naaaaahh I'm sorry oral history and superficial cultural similarities won't cut it for me. As a proud person of West-African descent I actually feel somewhat insulted by the notion that my ancestors supposedly came from Egypt. especially since there are many developments in which West-Africa was actually ahead of Ancient Egypt.
    At the bolded - Couldn't have put it better myself!
    The Bantu Expansion originating in Ancient Egypt sounds way too far fetched. The Bantu Expansion maybe truly understudied and under-researched. However that doesn't mean that we should entertain wild ideas about it.

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