User Tag List

Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Kurdistan1866 days old

  1. #1
    QBS Banned
    Molecular Biologist
    Last Online
    2014-08-31 @ 15:29
    Join Date
    2014-01-01
    Posts
    1,741
    Gender
    Y-DNA
    E1b1b1
    mtDNA
    L3i2
    Phenotype
    Aethiopid
    Ethnicity
    Somali
    Politics
    Centrist Progressivism
    Religion
    Islam
    Somalia Djibouti

    Default Kurdistan

    Map of Kurdistan:


    Kurdistan is not a internationally recognised country in the world. This region is inhabited by the ethnic Kurdish people whom are predominantly Muslims with rich history. The territory of Kurdistan is divided by four countries (Turkey, Syria, Iraq & Iran). Currently the Kurdistan section of Iraq have their own autonomous administration and enjoy more self-governance compared to other Kurdish regions. There are roughly 30-38 million ethnic Kurds worldwide. They are a significant and influential ethnic group in the regions they inhabit.

    Erbil is the capital of Iraqi Kurdistan:



































    - - - Updated - - -





























    Last edited by Ajuran; 2014-06-07 at 09:16.

  2. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Ajuran For This Useful Post:

    Awale (2014-06-07), beyw (2014-06-07), Hallteks (2014-06-07), Svin (2014-06-09), Zert (2014-06-07)

  3. # ADS
    Advertisement bot
    Join Date
    2013-03-24
    Posts
    All threads
       
     

  4. #2
    Established Member
    Zumurd-i sudah Zert's Avatar
    Last Online
    @
    Join Date
    2010-07-30
    Posts
    1,363
    Location
    Absurdistan
    Gender
    Age
    27
    Metaethnos
    Iranic
    Ethnicity
    Kurd
    Religion
    None (Atheism)
    Kurdistan Belgium Flanders lion Armenia

    Default

    Some history on the term:
    It is usually believed that Hamd-allah Mustaufi Qazvini was the first who made use of the term Kurdistan in his Nuzhat-al-qulub (1340). However, the earliest occurrences of this geographical name in historical sources date back to the 12th century and are attested in Armenian texts. Matt‘eos Urhayec‘i (d. 1138 or 1144), describing the events related to the end of the 11th century, writes: Yaysm ami zolov arareal omn Yehnuk anun, 5000 arambk‘ gnac‘eal i veray K‘rds tanac ‘ i gavarn Amt‘ay i telin, or Cepu-sahar koc‘i; ew areal bazum ew ant‘iw awar-oc‘xars ew paxres, jis ew carays ew ayl bazum awars; ew gayr i berdn, or koc‘i Seweraks. Ew hasaner i het, or awag er k‘rdac‘n, orum anun Xalt‘ asein, ink‘n ew iwr erek‘ ordik‘n; ew teseal Yehnukn ew iwr zork‘n i p‘axust darjan - “In the same year (1062-1063), a certain Yehnuk conscripted 5000 men [and] went [with them] to Kurdistans (sic!), in the district of Amid in a locality called Jebu-shahar; and taking a huge and countless booty-small and neat cattle, horses and servants and many other trophies, [he] came to a fortress called Sewerak. Soon [however], the leader of the Kurds whom [they] called Khalt, he himself and his three sons, overtook [Yehnuk]; and having seen them, Yehnuk and his army took to flight” (Urhayec‘i 1991: 156).

    The toponyms mentioned in the above passage-Amid, near Diyarbakır, and Sewerak (modern Siverek) to the south of Diyarbakır and to the north of Urfa (the ancient city of Edessa = Arm. Urha)-point to the fact that under the term Kurdistan the Armenian author in the 12th century implied an area between Urfa and Diarbekir. Moreover, as indicates the plural form of the name (Kurdistans!), it could not be a toponym in the strict sense of the word, but, rather, a conventional attribute of the demographic situation of the given territory. The plural forms of the georgraphical terms with the suffix –stan in Armenian, as well as the names of bigger units, even now show the indefinite and vague spatial dimensions. For instance, Rusastanner (pl. form of Russia in Armenian) does not mean Russia, but an area to the North of Armenia; or Parskastanner (pl. form of Persia in Arm.) indicates the south; Mjin Asianer (pl. of Central Asia)-the East; Evropaner (pl. of Europe)-the West (like Farang in Persian), etc. Therefore, Urhayec‘i’s K‘rdstanac‘ (acc. pl.) could simply be an ad hoc formation by analogy and not an established term.
    Later on, Kurdistan was often used in multiple ways; to indicate the ruling forces of an area, the demographically largest people, or an administrative region. (and in more recent times, short-lived countries, and an autonomous region)

    Before this there were other terms to indicate zones of Kurdish habitation. The Arabophone authors used terms like Zawzan (or Zuzan) al-Akrad (summer pastures of the Kurds); Bilad al-Akrad (land of the Kurds) and Jibal al-Akrad (mountains of the Kurds).

    Sources:
    Garnik Asatrian:
    https://ia600505.us.archive.org/14/i...rian_kurds.pdf

    Boris James:
    http://remmm.revues.org/3331
    or
    http://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/d..._the_Kurds.pdf

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Zert For This Useful Post:

    Ajuran (2014-06-07), beyw (2014-06-07)

  6. #3
    QBS Banned
    Molecular Biologist
    Last Online
    2014-08-31 @ 15:29
    Join Date
    2014-01-01
    Posts
    1,741
    Gender
    Y-DNA
    E1b1b1
    mtDNA
    L3i2
    Phenotype
    Aethiopid
    Ethnicity
    Somali
    Politics
    Centrist Progressivism
    Religion
    Islam
    Somalia Djibouti

    Default


  7. #4
    QBS Banned
    Molecular Biologist
    Last Online
    2015-12-05 @ 01:33
    Join Date
    2012-11-09
    Posts
    320
    Gender
    Age
    38

    Default

    All that shiny modernity and metallic buildings is nice and all, but from the pictures it seems like a generic "MENA" city that tries to polish itself and present a "fake modern city" with a plastic identity image. The buildings and the place seems like it was forced down, in a top-down command style, to be what it is and there is no real originality, philosophical essence or soul behind the city that connects a bridge with it's historic importance and past.

    I bet that the people designing the city were forced to do it in a "culturally acceptable" manner in which quality was pushed aside over quantity of money and the city was designed to "project an image" and to "save face" for an authority figure who likely didn't really know what the fuck he was doing or anything about real artistic creativity except to grab and copy whatever shiny thing he saw in a picture on a magazine or fancy architecture firm brochure leaflet that was given to him by a greedy generic designer company out to make money.

    From the buildings and surroundings, you see the typical Islamic MENA flavor and myopicness being present in the architecture forms; the buildings don't quite fit in or capture with the desert-ish barren wasteland background and it's quote obvious that from the gardens and buildings, that the structures and city is being shoved down and put there by force while being made as a generic cookie cutter design copy being imposed to cover up the blandness, underdeveloped backwardness, unorganic, barren feel of the place.

    Basically there is nothing unique about the structural forms here and it feels like there is a churned down dumbed down modern city being forced to be made there that has no real inside or creative expression that is showing to the outside world and it's made by someone else with limited choices and flexibility. The buildings sort of seems out of place compared to the region and morass of everything being pushed down on there.

    It's the typical design of a city I would expect from a "honor-based" and "ego-projecting" MENA culture, there is no real expression by the city except to help someone's ego feel good and to milk money from the place. This is the typical MENA mentality and way of designing and making cities that I see common across this region, which doesn't impress or compare with the higher up outside world like the West or East.

    I hate to sound like a pretentious art prick, but this city being built and seeded here, which like most of the MENA world, is by no means on the same level of expression and uniqueness as Moscow, London, Florence, Tokyo, Paris, Beijing, Boston, Venice, Shanghai, Budapest etc growing in fruition. I would say this applies to every single newly constructed and "developed", "Capital" and "City" that tries to look "modern" in the "MENA" region but fails in the process unfortunately.
    Last edited by Eyptianknight; 2014-06-09 at 04:08.

  8. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Eyptianknight For This Useful Post:

    beyw (2014-06-09), Svin (2014-06-09), Zert (2014-06-09)

  9. #5
    QBS Banned
    Molecular Biologist
    Last Online
    2014-08-31 @ 15:29
    Join Date
    2014-01-01
    Posts
    1,741
    Gender
    Y-DNA
    E1b1b1
    mtDNA
    L3i2
    Phenotype
    Aethiopid
    Ethnicity
    Somali
    Politics
    Centrist Progressivism
    Religion
    Islam
    Somalia Djibouti

    Default

    Sulaymaniyah, Kurdistan


  10. #6
    Established Member
    Junior Member
    Last Online
    2019-04-13 @ 04:31
    Join Date
    2010-01-19
    Posts
    1,247
    Gender
    Star of David

    Default

    Interesting thoughts, I think personally Erbil looks pretty nice and can accept and appreciate that its still under a lot of development so I don't feel as though its really ready yet to be critiqued against major world cities. I do agree though that economic incentives can kill off aspects of culture and heritage in the design of cityscapes, the UAE being a very good example. Unfortunately your right, too many cities today mirror each other with very homogenised architectural styles, the same grid street patters and the same TNC logo's everywhere. Still, I like that Erbil makes the most of courtyards, plaza's and has a fairly centralised layout and nice mountains (Zagros?) and rolling hills to surround it. Still looks a bit like a ghost city or wasteland in some parts, but its still being continuously developed. Just hope it doesn't go over the top in modernising.

    Sometimes simplicity and disorganisation is what makes a city awesome in my opinion, as long as its functional. Sanaa in Yemen for example I think still retains a very unique architectural style, despite repetitive designs and a lack of colours, but than again why should cities be overwhelmingly white like some Mediterranean cities? Or ridiculously colourful like some Puerto Rican towns and cities. I like the mosaics, absence of balconies and high floor space ratios.


  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Svin For This Useful Post:

    Ajuran (2014-06-09), Zert (2014-06-09)

  12. #7
    Established Member
    Zumurd-i sudah Zert's Avatar
    Last Online
    @
    Join Date
    2010-07-30
    Posts
    1,363
    Location
    Absurdistan
    Gender
    Age
    27
    Metaethnos
    Iranic
    Ethnicity
    Kurd
    Religion
    None (Atheism)
    Kurdistan Belgium Flanders lion Armenia

    Default

    Gotta agree with the above posts, the building-craze has made it into a generic city. Luckily, care is being given to other cities and towns to maintain their unique feel.

    http://rudaw.net/english/business/04052014

    I like the look of the typical Kurdish town built on the slope of a mountain:
    Akre:



    Palangan:



    Uramanat:



    Siah Dareh:
    Featured in 'the Wind Will Carry Us', by the famous Iranian filmmaker, Abbas Kiarostami. Can't find a proper pic, so I'll post the trailer:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wsS3sXwwwNo

  13. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Zert For This Useful Post:

    Awale (2014-06-09), beyw (2014-06-09), Svin (2014-06-09)

Similar Threads

  1. Minorities in Kurdistan - Iraq
    By ideas in forum Current Affairs & Politics
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 2012-04-13, 04:12
  2. Iraqi Kurdistan Independence by 2016: Says Former Obama Advisor
    By Sheikh-Ubayd in forum Current Affairs & Politics
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 2010-12-28, 22:45
  3. The situation of the internally displaced Assyrians in Iraqi Kurdistan
    By Sheikh-Ubayd in forum Current Affairs & Politics
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 2010-11-26, 13:27

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
<