User Tag List

Page 10 of 10 FirstFirst ... 8 9 10
Results 91 to 97 of 97

Thread: How Is Homosexuality Viewed In Your Country?1215 days old

  1. #91
    Established Member
    Molecular Biologist Rugevit's Avatar
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:50
    Join Date
    2013-12-04
    Posts
    2,923
    Gender
    Metaethnos
    Slavic
    Ethnicity
    Belarusian
    Lithuania Grand Duchy

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skaner View Post
    Ok, thank you. You see Belarus is like listed as a 'warning zone' on most gay travel sites, has a terrible portrayal in the media regarding this issue and fares consistently poorly in ILGA reviews and the like. I was just trying to work out if violence is one of the reasons why.
    You can read the site or you can read people who have first hand experience. Homosexual are not viewed favourably in Belarus . 99 times out 100 , you will not be beaten up for being gay in Belarus. You won't have many friends either if you are opened about your non-traditional sexual orientation. Unless you meet low social class people who would beat up anyone for anything. Just give them a reason.
    Last edited by Rugevit; 2016-09-29 at 10:35.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to Rugevit For This Useful Post:

    skaner (2016-09-29)

  3. # ADS
    Advertisement bot
    Join Date
    2013-03-24
    Posts
    All threads
       
     

  4. #92
    Established Member
    Here and Queer skaner's Avatar
    Last Online
    2017-09-10 @ 03:15
    Join Date
    2016-04-23
    Posts
    356
    Location
    Oxford, UK
    Gender
    Ethnicity
    Mixed race Briton
    Politics
    Anti-Capitalist
    Religion
    Atheist
    United Kingdom Germany Jamaica Grenada Gay pride Israel Star of David

    Default

    Some interesting analysis regarding Europe here. I have emboldened some key points:

    Rainbow Europe 2016 showcases the current state of play of the laws, policies and practices that affect LGBTI people in Europe today. This year’s benchmarking exercise shows three distinct patterns:

    1. countries who are demonstrating leadership by introducing standard-setting equality measures;
    2. countries who are now standing still, including some traditionally seen as progressive;
    3. and the countries who are actively targeting LGBTI people with restrictive laws.


    The latest Rainbow Europe Map, which reflects legal and policy developments, confirms that a few countries are still setting new standards for LGBTI equality and being propelled upward on our country ranking as a result. ILGA-Europe Executive Director Evelyne Paradis noted “The countries who are on this upward curve tend to be the ones who have protected people from discrimination on the grounds of gender identity, or legislated to protect the bodily integrity of intersex people and who have ingrained this change in everyday measures such as equality actions plans. Malta’s rise to the top of the Rainbow Europe rankings for the first time is a prime example of this standard-setting in action. These advances represent very welcome progress”

    [...]

    Brian Sheehan, Co-Chair of ILGA-Europe’s Executive Board, also commented: “There is an inherent danger in thinking that our equality work is done when we achieve protection in one facet of life, such as equal marriage or parenting rights. Such successes can give politicians the adrenaline needed to keep working towards full equality. These achievements can be the fuel that propels us to further progress; slowing down the pace of this change is a lost opportunity. We must remember that these hard-won advances will only benefit LGBTI people if they are translated into into the daily lived experience of being LGBTI. Having a law is only truly useful if they are implemented. Changing laws does not automatically change lives. What LGBTI people all over Europe need from their governments now is continual, committed and collaborative action.”
    So this seems to run contrary to what I said about EU integration, for example. That said, there is a flaw in this, given that a significant amount of their analysis is based around current legislation. I think this point does stand true in some instances but I also think that government intervention is somewhat essential for tackling discrimination. People often quote South Africa as an example outside of Europe where quite advanced pro-LGBT legislation has apparently little bearing on people's living standards. I couldn't agree less. If you compare South Africa to surrounding countries in Southern Africa, the situation seems vastly improved and there have been attitude surveys to suggest this. Yes, in South Africa, LGBT acceptance does link to class and race but this seems to be a trend in most of the world outside Europe, North America and East Asia. And even with that factored in, there still seems to be huge improvement.

    What I deem to be a very key point, however, is that LGBT supportive legislation has to look beyond the obvious, beyond cohabitation rights. There needs to be active discouragement of homophobia on behalf of the government and hate crimes need to be well defined and strongly asserted. Even things like the ability for MSMs to donate blood, something which is still illegal in the UK, have an impact on people's perceptions and attitudes towards homosexuality. I haven't spoken about legislation based on gender identity/ expression because that is an issue in itself but that too is hugely important.

    In the countries at the bottom of our country ranking, LGBTI people and their families are faced with a scenario where their rights are actively being eroded. ILGA-Europe’s latest Rainbow Europe package also contains a stark reminder that Europe is not just damaged by this slowing legislative process. The absence of supportive laws and policies is one thing, the legalisation of oppression is another threat altogether. Regressive laws, targeting both individuals and the work of LGBTI activists and NGOs, are a pernicious and real threat in many European countries.

    [...]
    Laws by themselves don’t automatically mean that life is easy – or even safe – for LGBTI people in all the countries at the top of the Rainbow Europe country ranking. A truly accurate picture is one that combines legal conditions and living conditions, that’s why it’s important to use our Map and the Annual Review in tandem.
    Source: http://www.ilga-europe.org/resources...ow-europe/2016

    I have not yet read the annual review but will post about it soon.

    Here is the map:


  5. The Following User Says Thank You to skaner For This Useful Post:

    David Noi (2016-10-05)

  6. #93
    Established Member
    Molecular Biologist Rugevit's Avatar
    Last Online
    Today @ 05:50
    Join Date
    2013-12-04
    Posts
    2,923
    Gender
    Metaethnos
    Slavic
    Ethnicity
    Belarusian
    Lithuania Grand Duchy

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skaner View Post
    Some interesting analysis regarding Europe here. I have emboldened some key points:



    So this seems to run contrary to what I said about EU integration, for example. That said, there is a flaw in this, given that a significant amount of their analysis is based around current legislation. I think this point does stand true in some instances but I also think that government intervention is somewhat essential for tackling discrimination. People often quote South Africa as an example outside of Europe where quite advanced pro-LGBT legislation has apparently little bearing on people's living standards. I couldn't agree less. If you compare South Africa to surrounding countries in Southern Africa, the situation seems vastly improved and there have been attitude surveys to suggest this. Yes, in South Africa, LGBT acceptance does link to class and race but this seems to be a trend in most of the world outside Europe, North America and East Asia. And even with that factored in, there still seems to be huge improvement.

    What I deem to be a very key point, however, is that LGBT supportive legislation has to look beyond the obvious, beyond cohabitation rights. There needs to be active discouragement of homophobia on behalf of the government and hate crimes need to be well defined and strongly asserted. Even things like the ability for MSMs to donate blood, something which is still illegal in the UK, have an impact on people's perceptions and attitudes towards homosexuality. I haven't spoken about legislation based on gender identity/ expression because that is an issue in itself but that too is hugely important.


    Source: http://www.ilga-europe.org/resources...ow-europe/2016

    I have not yet read the annual review but will post about it soon.

    Here is the map:


    How such statistics are collected in countries such as those of Eastern Europe? A lot of these charts and tables are non-sensual unless described how data were collected and analysed in details.

    Don't get me wrong. I am not trying to portray we tolerant towards homosexual. We won't be able to have a Mardi Gras (gay parade) to which children are taken.

    But thinking that we are not aware of gay looking for an opportunity to put them down is far from being accurate. People will get on your side if injustice is done to you regardless of your social status or sexual orientation.
    Last edited by Rugevit; 2016-09-29 at 11:00.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Rugevit For This Useful Post:

    skaner (2016-09-29)

  8. #94
    Established Member
    Here and Queer skaner's Avatar
    Last Online
    2017-09-10 @ 03:15
    Join Date
    2016-04-23
    Posts
    356
    Location
    Oxford, UK
    Gender
    Ethnicity
    Mixed race Briton
    Politics
    Anti-Capitalist
    Religion
    Atheist
    United Kingdom Germany Jamaica Grenada Gay pride Israel Star of David

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rugevit View Post
    You can read the site or you can read people who have first hand experience. Homosexual are not viewed favourably in Belarus . 99 times out 100 , you will not be beaten up for being gay in Belarus. You won't have many friends either if you are opened about your non-traditional sexual orientation. Unless you meet low social class people who would beat up anyone for anything. Just give them a reason.
    That's why I'm asking you!

    I think class divisions always play a role in homophobia. It's like what redifflal said about scope for sexual freedom when is of a higher socioeconomic status. But it's more than that. There's often less of a focus on raw physicality in middle/ upper-class groups generally. This changes the means by which people express their disapproval of others. They work by disengagement or ostracism whereas working class populations seem to work more by active engagement in the form of confrontation. I think you see this in India and Pakistan from what I understand of gay rights there. Same in Italy. Here in the UK there seems to be more of a blanket acceptance of LGBT people. People don't fully accept and there are still social burdens against us but the only people who seem to show active opposition, at least to the concept of homosexuality, tend to be deeply religious, with a few exceptions obviously.
    Actually people will often have individual disapproval but it's active disapproval which causes damage.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Rugevit View Post
    How such statistics are collected in countries such as those of Eastern Europe? A lot of these charts and tables are non-sensual unless the describe how data were collected and analysed in details.

    Don't get me wrong. I am not trying to portray we tolerant towards homosexual. We won't be able to have a Mardi Gras (gay parade) to which children are taken.

    But thinking that we are not aware of gay looking for an opportunity to put them down is far from being accurate. People will get on your side if injustice is done to you regardless of your social status or sexual orientation.
    I agree. I'll read the annual review and hopefully that will give more of an explanation. You have to remember though that this is not simply focused on homosexuality but LGBT rights more generally. So things like right to change legal gender without having gender confirmation surgery or even having a third gender category play a role. That's why Malta has such a high score. They introduced laws recently allowing parents to mark their children in an agendered category if they are born intersex. They've also allowed a third gender/ agender as a legal category. It was some of the most advanced trans rights legislation ever introduced in Europe and that pushed them way up.

    But I'm sure you are right. That said, it's important to be ambitious and look beyond simply tolerating homosexuality as a fringe sexuality or not tolerating it but not being violently opposed towards it either. That's my view as a gay person anyway. I want full acceptance rather than reluctant tolerance.

  9. #95
    Regular Member
    Theorist EclectYummi's Avatar
    Last Online
    2017-01-21 @ 15:40
    Join Date
    2017-01-01
    Posts
    20
    Gender
    Age
    30
    Metaethnos
    North American
    Ethnicity
    black American
    Phenotype
    sort of like Ice Cube
    Politics
    MildlyLiberal/Centrist
    Religion
    I believe in Yahoshua
    United States

    Default

    It varies.

    You have some very intolerrant types and you've got some very tolerant types.

    It also varies by region. They say the South is more intolerant.

  10. #96
    Established Member
    Evolutionary Biologist beyw's Avatar
    Last Online
    2018-05-06 @ 15:12
    Join Date
    2013-09-11
    Posts
    209
    Location
    Sweden
    Gender
    Y-DNA
    R1a1a
    Race
    Caucasian
    Ethnicity
    Kurd
    Phenotype
    Alpinid/Iranid
    Politics
    Kurdistan yan Neman
    Religion
    None
    Kurdistan Sweden

    Default

    Homosexuality was decriminalised in 1858 in the Ottoman Empire as part of the Tanzimat reforms, and has remained a non-punishable act since.

    But there is despite that still a very large social stigma around homosexuality as many people are old-fashioned (ironically not old-fashioned enough). Homosexuals were up until 2015 exempt from military service if they could provide pictures of them engaging in homosexual intercourse (a Turk I know told me they had to be the taker, not the giver, interestingly enough).

    In Sweden it usually isn't a problem at all. Wogs have a much bigger issue with it, but it usually doesn't go beyond some fear of the gay one moving on them lol.

  11. #97
    Established Member
    Lord of Asgard Odin's Avatar
    Last Online
    2019-07-15 @ 00:30
    Join Date
    2018-05-08
    Posts
    1,200
    Location
    West Coast
    Gender
    Age
    29
    Race
    Europid
    Metaethnos
    Germanic
    Ethnicity
    American
    Phenotype
    Nordo-Cromagnid
    Politics
    Paleoconservatism
    Religion
    Christian
    Viking Norway Denmark Netherlands United States

    Default


Page 10 of 10 FirstFirst ... 8 9 10

Similar Threads

  1. What is more taboo in your country? Homosexuality or miscegenation?
    By najbritcol in forum Current Affairs & Politics
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 2013-09-08, 07:41
  2. What will this Papuan Muslim guy be viewed in your area?
    By ilham_indonesia in forum Race & Ethnicity in Society
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 2012-10-19, 19:42
  3. How would he be viewed in NYC/NJ area?
    By Johnny Blaze in forum Classification Requests
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 2011-04-07, 06:33
  4. How would these Sudanese dudes be viewed in your area?
    By Johnny Blaze in forum Classification Requests
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 2011-03-08, 01:44

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
<