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Thread: Three math books for elite math skills from the ground up974 days old

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    Quote Originally Posted by NixYO View Post
    But he said that they're good for n00bs. The recommendations weren't directed towards professional mathematicians.
    Actually, two of the math books are for n00bs but "What Is Mathematics? An Elementary Approach to Ideas and Methods 2nd Edition by Ian Stewart, Herbert Robbins, and Ian Stewart" is not for n00bs but not for professional mathematicians either per se and if you read the companion book "From Here To Infinity : A Guide to Today's Mathematics" by Ian Stewart and maybe peruse superficially through one or two other books you will be very up to date with mathematics. "What is Mathematics ? " is not entirely suitable for the layman. Its target audience includes those who enjoy reading and studying mathematics and have a good background through precalculus or higher.
    Last edited by ThePendragon; 2016-11-25 at 16:15.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rugevit View Post
    But they guy is intellectually challenged. I've never called dumb anyone on this forum in several years since I joined. I will stand by my words - the guy is stupid.
    Yes, he's extremely narcissistic and often tries to play the tough guy; this quote from Alex Linder is pretty descriptive:

    “It's a sign of how undeveloped politics is in Anglo world that it's eternally a battle of personalities, and never gets to the deep & real.” — Alex Linder, https://twitter.com/A_Linder_5/statu...48792989700096 (his account is apparently suspended)

    ^^ And this behaviour tend to characterize his posts and OPs, so it isn't hard to see why people goes OT, but let's stop doing that now. What is your opinions on the books themselves?

    Mathematics For the Million: How To Master the Magic of Numbers by Lancelot Hogben: https://archive.org/details/HogbenMa...sForTheMillion

    Mathematic in 10 lessons: The Grand Tour by Jerry P. King: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mathematics...dp/1591026865/

    What Is Mathematics? An Elementary Approach to Ideas and Methods by Richard Courant (Author), Ian Stewart (Editor) and Herbert Robbins (Contributor): https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mathematics...dp/0195105192/
    Last edited by NixYO; 2016-11-25 at 16:19.
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    Moved five posts to the thread E. B. Farnum VS Mr. Blazanov [split] //mod.

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    “And, furthermore, that some people have a sex life and others don’t just because some are more attractive than others. I wanted to acknowledge that if people don’t have a sex life, it’s not for some moral reason, it’s just because they’re ugly. Once you’ve said it, it sounds obvious, but I wanted to say it.” — Michel Houellebecq

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    Math is incredibly important, and really one of the few scientific fields that are 100% objective (I'd say more so than physics, although physics is mostly or largely math anyway).

    Personally I've never been interested in math though. To me it's just a 'dead language' so to say. If I practice or calculate math enough, I become good at it, but I hate wasting time on math. It's incredibly boring and I always feel like it doesn't give me much in return. Reading a 500 pages book is so much more enlightening and fascinating, which is also why I've never bothered with math (it's just not fun, it's really super boring). But I do recognize the tremendous importance math has contributed to civilization. In fact, you can't have civilization without math, although, language and the written language is actually far more important to civilization, but math is the next big step or 'upgrade' in civilization after the writing script has been invented.

    Buildings, architecture, art, computers and computer science in general, all that stuff, can't be done without math, so we should celebrate and appreciate math more than we do. Me personally though, I have no passion for math

    By the way, while we're at it, @ThePendragon , do you think Collatz conjecture will ever be solved? I've contributed some serious BOINC power to it (with my ATI GPUs!), but it seems pointless to do so anyway (just a lot of money spent on the electric bill).
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    Quote Originally Posted by EliasAlucard View Post
    Math is incredibly important, and really one of the few scientific fields that are 100% objective (I'd say more so than physics, although physics is mostly or largely math anyway).

    Personally I've never been interested in math though. To me it's just a 'dead language' so to say. If I practice or calculate math enough, I become good at it, but I hate wasting time on math. It's incredibly boring and I always feel like it doesn't give me much in return. Reading a 500 pages book is so much more enlightening and fascinating, which is also why I've never bothered with math (it's just not fun, it's really super boring). But I do recognize the tremendous importance math has contributed to civilization. In fact, you can't have civilization without math, although, language and the written language is actually far more important to civilization, but math is the next big step or 'upgrade' in civilization after the writing script has been invented.

    Buildings, architecture, art, computers and computer science in general, all that stuff, can't be done without math, so we should celebrate and appreciate math more than we do. Me personally though, I have no passion for math

    By the way, while we're at it, @ThePendragon , do you think Collatz conjecture will ever be solved? I've contributed some serious BOINC power to it (with my ATI GPUs!), but it seems pointless to do so anyway (just a lot of money spent on the electric bill).
    Math was not my best subject but I managed to pass in both Math A and B in high school. I didn't bother with Math C, as I thought I wouldn't be good there. It's important for anyone to have basic math skills like knowing how to calculate percentage and knowing how to round off. I am a statistics nerd and I can read demography statistics, economic statistic or sport statistic for hours sometime.

    Btw, ThePendragon why the hell did you went from an America-hating Frenchie to a Wasp? Which of it is your real you?
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    Love math, I'm reading Geoffrey Grimmett and David Stirzaker: Probability and Random Processes and DK Cheng: Field and Wave Electromagnetics at the moment. Just finished reading Matthias Beck, Gerald Marchesi, Dennis Pixton, and Lucas Sabalka: A First Course in Complex Analysis. Quite a pleasant, short, and compact book which delves into the core ideas of complex analysis, with it's ending chapters developing techniques for solving residue problems.

    Just love the rush I get from solving equations and mathematical problems, it's like a drug. Physics I can do without however. Just finished reading Elliot and Lira: Introductory Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics, a beast of a book, which gives me headaches to this day. It wasn't all that well structured either, with the Maxwell equations coming quite late in the book which would have helped in the understanding early on. Book on physics are a different kind of animal, establishing different postulates early on and building on that, with loads of approximations etc. Math is much purer, everything has to be proven.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EliasAlucard View Post
    Math is incredibly important, and really one of the few scientific fields that are 100% objective (I'd say more so than physics, although physics is mostly or largely math anyway).

    Personally I've never been interested in math though. To me it's just a 'dead language' so to say. If I practice or calculate math enough, I become good at it, but I hate wasting time on math. It's incredibly boring and I always feel like it doesn't give me much in return. Reading a 500 pages book is so much more enlightening and fascinating, which is also why I've never bothered with math (it's just not fun, it's really super boring). But I do recognize the tremendous importance math has contributed to civilization. In fact, you can't have civilization without math, although, language and the written language is actually far more important to civilization, but math is the next big step or 'upgrade' in civilization after the writing script has been invented.
    Actually, my book recommendations are for people like you. Math is not a 'dead language' it is the only truly international language that leaves no room for personal sentiment from the individual or the nation. I think the main problem is the way it is taught in school (at least in the West). The two books "Mathematics for the Million..." by Lancelot Hogben and "Mathematics in 10 lessons : the Grand Tour " by Jerry King take a very different approach to teaching mathematics than the one that is currently given in schools. My hope was people like you (I was just like you) would be able to get into a book like "What is Mathematics ?... " by first reading those first two books. That is what Rugevit doesn't get. This relatively cheap book can take the place of bigger undergraduate textbooks on the subject. Rugevit says mathematicians only read other mathematician's research papers but how the hell does he expect normal people to be able to get to that level without the books I recommended ? I dunno why people think I am being narcisstic in this thread. It is funny that you say it is a 'dead language' but then go on to contradict yourself by saying it is incredibly important for modern civilization. Actually, I think I get what you are saying -- you are saying it is a dead language for you personally subjectively but not objectively for civilization. Broseph, it doesn't have to be that way my book recommendations are exactly for people like you and not for Rugevit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Elias
    Buildings, architecture, art, computers and computer science in general, all that stuff, can't be done without math, so we should celebrate and appreciate math more than we do. Me personally though, I have no passion for math

    By the way, while we're at it, @ThePendragon , do you think Collatz conjecture will ever be solved? I've contributed some serious BOINC power to it (with my ATI GPUs!), but it seems pointless to do so anyway (just a lot of money spent on the electric bill).
    I think in the far off future it will be solved it is like an avante-garde like conjecture right now IMHO.
    Last edited by ThePendragon; 2016-11-26 at 03:13. Reason: punctuation
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    Quote Originally Posted by EliasAlucard View Post
    Math is incredibly important, and really one of the few scientific fields that are 100% objective (I'd say more so than physics, although physics is mostly or largely math anyway).

    Personally I've never been interested in math though. To me it's just a 'dead language' so to say. If I practice or calculate math enough, I become good at it, but I hate wasting time on math. It's incredibly boring and I always feel like it doesn't give me much in return. Reading a 500 pages book is so much more enlightening and fascinating, which is also why I've never bothered with math (it's just not fun, it's really super boring). But I do recognize the tremendous importance math has contributed to civilization. In fact, you can't have civilization without math, although, language and the written language is actually far more important to civilization, but math is the next big step or 'upgrade' in civilization after the writing script has been invented.

    Buildings, architecture, art, computers and computer science in general, all that stuff, can't be done without math, so we should celebrate and appreciate math more than we do. Me personally though, I have no passion for math

    By the way, while we're at it, @ThePendragon , do you think Collatz conjecture will ever be solved? I've contributed some serious BOINC power to it (with my ATI GPUs!), but it seems pointless to do so anyway (just a lot of money spent on the electric bill).
    Some art can obviously be done without math and just intuition + motor skills. Actually, one of the great math geniuses Srinivasa Ramanujan even did math solely through intuition (rather than consciously following mechanical rules). He made major breakthroughs in math but couldn't formally explain them in western lines of thinking, which made western scholars question him. There's a movie about him I recommend everyone to watch.

    He was deeply religious and credited his substantial mathematical capacities to divinity: "An equation for me has no meaning, unless it expresses a thought of God."

    Anyway, you are obviously a creative writer, and I don't personally think the best writers/authors are 'math persons'. To be a good writer, you must have a certain kind of intuitional domain where math doesn't reach, which enables you to write creatively and beautifully. Math is something you do, writing is something you engage in.

    Me personally, I can't do math. Numbers freaks me out

    I've had math phobia since a child, and it's still a thorn in my eye. Math just comes of as too rigid and systematic for me (although I've never wholeheartedly tried it). As you say, quite frankly boring and lifeless (at least the way it was taught in school) for vivid and intuitive thinkers. They say being a math person or not is a myth, but I don't think so. I mean some people simply just aren't math persons, just as some people suck at languages (but are otherwise smart).

    I really want to conquer math and become good at it though. I think calculating math structures/systemizes your brain (which is plastic), organizes and improves your general logical thinking and cognitive function. I think there's a connection in how well you do math, and how effectively you can process information, as well as how well you do analytical and abstract thinking. Counting math will obviously increase the connections between neurons in your brain, and thus maximize your brains potential from a logical POV. I can't think of better brain gymnastics. I don't think it can increase your maximum IQ, but I think it can bring your IQ closer to its peak and speed up your cognition. I view math as going to the gym for the brainz. It's not funny, but it will increase your brain strenght (efficiency).

    I don't think people who're good at math necessarily possess higher intelligence than people who suck at math either. I know some engineering students who excel at math, but come off as autists or morons in a general sense. Persons who couldn't write a book if their lives depended on it. I think true math wizards are single-track human beings who are made for specialized fields in sciences such as engineering and physics, but who aren't necessarily well equiped for domains such as politics, which requiers a high degree of emotional, strategical (visual, spatial) and verbal intelligence. Something more than just plain logic, that gives you the ability to distinguish right from wrong and assess issues holistically.

    The most intelligent persons are IMO those who potentially can both excel in math and language (high linguistic + logical intelligence), such as some of the great philosophers in history.

    I also believe there are things math definitely can't do. Math can't reach the symbolic and mythical aspects of life. For example, if you look at nature, it's obvious there's structure, but not math like structure. A flower is structured, but it is not plain and straight, it is assymetrical symmetry - resulting in beauty and surpassing the domain of mechanical structure. Math is like the human code of the universe, but not the key to its mystery I believe.

    Maybe I shall give one of those books a try.
    Last edited by Aragorn; 2016-11-26 at 04:00.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aragorn View Post
    Some art can obviously be done without math and just intuition + motor skills. Actually, one of the great math geniuses Srinivasa Ramanujan even did math solely through intuition (rather than consciously following mechanical rules). He made major breakthroughs in math but couldn't formally explain them in western lines of thinking, which made western scholars question him. There's a movie about him I recommend everyone to watch.


    He was deeply religious and credited his substantial mathematical capacities to divinity: "An equation for me has no meaning, unless it expresses a thought of God."
    You made a good post here, unlike Rugevit, actually my original post, in this thread, was specifically for people like you and not for people like Rugevit.

    BTW, yeah, I am atheist but I am hoping to find God through Math, like Ramanujan, and science, like Lord Kelvin but don't hold your breath. Hoping to find God is part of what is motivating me to do Math.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aragorn
    Anyway, you are obviously a creative writer, and I don't personally think the best writers/authors are 'math persons'. To be a good writer, you must have a certain kind of intuitional domain where math doesn't reach, which enables you to write creatively and beautifully. Math is something you do, writing is something you engage in.
    I dunno there is a world of difference between non-fiction books and fiction books and in fiction books you probably have more of a point. Math textbooks are dry but books about mathematics cannot be poorly written, at least not since the 20th century or so, since publishing standards are competitive and the cream rises to the top. You might be pleasantly surprised by some of the books I recommended. If they are too heavy for you, at least at first, books like "Innumeracy" by John Allen Paulos and "How Not to be Wrong : the Power of Mathematical Thinking" by Jordan Ellenberg might be gentler better written easier reading before taking the plunge into the books I recommended.

    As a side note : Rugevit engaged in the logical fallacy of the argumentum ad verecundiam but two can play at that game. Marilyn Vos Savant, who has a 220 IQ, recommended the book "Mathematics for the Million..." by Lancelot Hogben in her book "Brain Building..." and I highly doubt Rugevit is as smart as her.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aragorn
    Me personally, I can't do math. Numbers freaks me out
    Ah, you should probably start with the two books I recommended, to you, start with "Innumeracy" first then "How Not to be Wrong.." next.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aragorn
    I've had math phobia since a child, and it's still a thorn in my eye. Math just comes of as too rigid and systematic for me (although I've never wholeheartedly tried it). As you say, quite frankly boring and lifeless (at least the way it was taught in school) for vivid and intuitive thinkers. They say being a math person or not is a myth, but I don't think so. I mean some people simply just aren't math persons, just as some people suck at languages (but are otherwise smart).
    It is just taught wrong in school, trust me, you just need to wholeheartedly try. The reason why it is taught wrong can be blamed on the ancient philosopher Plato and Euclid to a lesser extent. Math is a language : it is the language of size, order and shape. You say it is boring and lifeless but Einstein said of the book, I recommended, "Mathematics for the Million..." : "It makes alive the contents of mathematics" -- Albert Einstein

    Trust me the book makes math alive in a historical context as the story of mans ever increasing need to control nature etc...


    Quote Originally Posted by Aragorn
    I really want to conquer math and become good at it though. I think calculating math structures/systemizes your brain (which is plastic), organizes and improves your general logical thinking and cognitive function. I think there's a connection in how well you do math, and how effectively you can process information, as well as how well you do analytical and abstract thinking. Counting math will obviously increase the connections between neurons in your brain, and thus maximize your brains potential from a logical POV. I can't think of better brain gymnastics. I don't think it can increase your maximum IQ, but I think it can bring your IQ closer to its peak and speed up your cognition. I view math as going to the gym for the brainz. It's not funny, but it will increase your brain strenght (efficiency).
    Yeah, you should master math the best you can. I'm not saying become a mathematician but if it is a weak spot of yours then it is good to get rid of that chink in your armor. That is how I got good at math; I realized it was my weak spot and I sought out the right books since the schooling system failed me in this regard. You will hear people tell you math teaches you how to think and there is alot of truth to that. Your deductive reasoning powers will go off the hook, you will be able to better solve everyday problems, your view of the world will change to a more sound deeper one : you will see a skeleton to an otherwise seemingly chaotic formless world; it will also help you with syllogistic skills your in writing so on and so forth. It is really best for deductive reasoning but also helps with induction, to a lesser extent, because it also deals with rank and order with the series concept.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aragorn
    I don't think people who're good at math necessarily possess higher intelligence than people who suck at math either. I know some engineering students who excel at math, but come off as autists or morons in a general sense. Persons who couldn't write a book if their lives depended on it. I think true math wizards are single-track human beings who are made for specialized fields in sciences such as engineering and physics, but who aren't necessarily well equiped for domains such as politics, which requiers a high degree of emotional, strategical (visual, spatial) and verbal intelligence. Something more than just plain logic, that gives you the ability to distinguish right from wrong and assess issues holistically
    They are not necessarily born smarter per se but they might actually become smarter and they might actually be born with innate talent and then capitalize on it making quantum leaps above you in intelligence. However, math doesn't just require logic but also visual-spatial intelligence. You can get better at math too. You don't have to become a wizard but believe me you will not regret increasing your mathematics skills and intelligence.
    .

    Quote Originally Posted by Aragorn
    The most intelligent persons are IMO those who potentially can both excel in math and language (high linguistic + logical intelligence), such as some of the great philosophers in history.
    Probably true

    Quote Originally Posted by Aragorn
    I also believe there are things math definitely can't do. Math can't reach the symbolic and mythical aspects of life. For example, if you look at nature, it's obvious there's structure, but not math like structure. A flower is structured, but it is not plain and straight, it is assymetrical symmetry - resulting in beauty and surpassing the domain of mechanical structure. Math is like the human code of the universe, but not the key to its mystery I believe.
    Are you sure there is not a Fibonacci math sequence to the flower petals structure or arrangement ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Aragorn
    Maybe I shall give one of those books a try.
    You won't regret it but you should maybe give those other books I recommended a more casual reading first. Those books I first recommended, in the OP, are going to be more hardcore analytical reading. At times you will be greatly enthusiastic about reading them and at other parts you just have force yourself to plow through them. The end result you will not regret I promise. However, have a pen or pencil and a notebook handy to do some mathematical scribbling alongside the ones I recommended in my OP or first post in this thread.
    Last edited by ThePendragon; 2016-11-26 at 07:29.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThePendragon View Post
    Actually, my book recommendations are for people like you.
    Probably, and I'm sure I'd be able to make good use of them, if I cared about math. Who knows, maybe some day when I'm 80 I'll develop a passion for math -- but right now, it feels like I just don't need math in this life. I am however, an autodidact, and in fact, pretty much everything I know I've learned on my own; my parents really didn't teach me anything, the only thing my school teachers taught me was the alphabet and arithmetics. I thought math was interesting until we got to division in the fifth or maybe fourth grade (I can't remember which right now), after that I began losing interest in math because division was a slightly difficult at that age, especially with my concentration problems, which lead to me being unable to focus in my entire school years (not just math btw, and never eating breakfast in the mornings probably also contributed to my concentration problems). This all lead to me having lousy math grades, and serious problems getting a "godkänd" (grades approved) in math later on. However, I actually got godkänd when I focused on math for like a week or two straight. Math isn't difficult when I set my mind on it, it's just that my mind is constantly busy focusing on other stuff that are way more interesting. In my teens, my focus was totally set on video games, computers, action films, comic books, astronomy, Anne Rice novels (The Vampire Chronicles mainly), bodybuilding, taekwondo, and porn. In other words, pretty much the same interests and hobbies I have now, although I have to get back to Taekwondo at some point

    Quote Originally Posted by ThePendragon View Post
    Math is not a 'dead language' it is the only truly international language that leaves no room for personal sentiment from the individual or the nation.
    Math isn't an international language at all; it's a universal language. As I'm sure you know, if there are extra-terrestrial aliens at or above human intelligence, we can only communicate with them (at least initially) through math, which is quite awesome in and of itself.

    Quote Originally Posted by ThePendragon View Post
    I think the main problem is the way it is taught in school (at least in the West).
    Yeah, but it's not just math that suffers from this problem: the school system in the entire West sucks hard. Again: I never really learned anything in school. I intentionally flunked almost all my grades in the ninth grade (I was approved only in English and music, even though I was barely there, and that's because my English teacher knew hands down I was by far the best English speaker in my class, and I knew a lot about music too, based on the 2-3 classes I showed up). The Swedish school system (and this is in no way unique to Swedish schools btw; American schools probably suck even more) manages to make something as interesting, fascinating and awesome as knowledge, boring. That's one hell of an accomplishment! Few things in life are more fun than knowledge, but you go to school, and some boring stiff robot who doesn't know what the hell he's talking about and has to read straight from the book in every class (with no passion, interest or deeper knowledge in the subject he's teaching), is supposed to teach young kids about how the world works. Doesn't work that way.

    Throughout school, there were only like, 2-3 teachers I really liked, one of whom was named "Lars-Göran", that guy was really cool and fun as hell. I loved showing up on his classes. He had a great sense of humor too (he used to sarcastically and condescendingly call us "the MTV generation" as if that was a bad thing). All other teachers sucked and they were only there for the salary, not because they had any passion for or understanding of their duty, that their job is to impart something as important as knowledge, to us, the generation of the future. I think the "American Nietzsche" nailed it:

    The most erroneous assumption is to the effect that the aim of public education is to fill the young of the species with knowledge and awaken their intelligence, and so make them fit to discharge the duties of citizenship in an enlightened and independent manner. Nothing could be further from the truth. The aim of public education is not to spread enlightenment at all; it is simply to reduce as many individuals as possible to the same safe level, to breed and train a standardized citizenry, to put down dissent and originality. That is its aim in the United States, whatever the pretensions of politicians, pedagogues and other such mountebanks, and that is its aim everywhere else.” ― H.L. Mencken

    ^^ This is why school sucks. As long as education is going to be anti-knowledge, anti-originality and pro-brainwashing, school will always suck. And I'm so proud of having dropped out of the shitty school system. To hell with that shit

    The irony here is, that I'd actually make a really good teacher (seriously, no joke!). I'm very open-minded and knowledgeable, I'm a very fast learner and I am -- believe it or not -- very pedagogic too (I'm also really good at explaining complicated things in an ingenious way, especially IRL). I just hate school and I feel like setting my foot in a school room room again, even as a teacher, would be like waking up to a nightmare, and math more than any other subject, feels like school. In a sense though, I guess you could say I'm a free of charge online teacher here on ABF

    Quote Originally Posted by ThePendragon View Post
    The two books "Mathematics for the Million..." by Lancelot Hogben and "Mathematics in 10 lessons : the Grand Tour " by Jerry King take a very different approach to teaching mathematics than the one that is currently given in schools. My hope was people like you (I was just like you) would be able to get into a book like "What is Mathematics ?... " by first reading those first two books. That is what Rugevit doesn't get. This relatively cheap book can take the place of bigger undergraduate textbooks on the subject. Rugevit says mathematicians only read other mathematician's research papers but how the hell does he expect normal people to be able to get to that level without the books I recommended ? I dunno why people think I am being narcisstic in this thread. It is funny that you say it is a 'dead language' but then go on to contradict yourself by saying it is incredibly important for modern civilization. Actually, I think I get what you are saying -- you are saying it is a dead language for you personally subjectively but not objectively for civilization. Broseph, it doesn't have to be that way my book recommendations are exactly for people like you and not for Rugevit.
    Never mind @Rugevit , and this is a good thread and I appreciate you started it (we need threads like this one, and we definitely should diversify the topics here on ABF, as opposed to only genetics and politics; make no mistake about it, this really is a science forum first and foremost, and math is a very important field to discuss).

    Look, I'm no ignoramus; I take knowledge very seriously, always have. I fully understand the tremendous importance of math, but it's just not my cup of tea, that's all. What I meant when I said it's a dead language, isn't of course that it is, it's just that math is a language you have no real use of in the real world, unless you're a professional scientist of some sort (which I have no intention of becoming). You can't charm or impress women and get laid by knowing math at an advanced level (unless she's into math also, and that's almost always the ugly chicks who are into that), you can't write a novel by being proficient in math (which is what I'm actually aiming at; my dream is becoming an author), and statistically speaking, it's easier to become financially successful, through great oratory skills (Jews being the most notable example), and that's what I am: verbally gifted (I guess I have that Semitic gene so to say). It's not that I'm genetically inferior at math or anything like that, I just hate math because it's such an autistic, anti-social field of study. You have to be a bit like that schizo guy in A Beautiful Mind to enjoy math (great movie btw). It's no coincidence that all those aspie savants are math geniuses.

    That said, I did make some decent money recently on Trump's victory, and I guess you could attribute that to my math skills So many things were in the right place at the right time and it was all interconnected beautifully and perfectly as far as my synchromysticism radar was concerned, that I calculated a Trump loss was, statistically speaking, extremely unlikely! And this in spite of all the polls and pundits 24/7 saying Trump would lose, but I knew better than those morons

    Quote Originally Posted by ThePendragon View Post
    I think in the far off future it will be solved it is like an avante-garde like conjecture right now IMHO.
    Cool. I just bought two new Asus Strix Radeon R9 Fury GPUs, and I'll be contributing some serious shit to BOINC with them soon, who knows, my work units just may solve Collatz conjecture
    ReactOS <--- support this project so that we can get rid of Windows!
    Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS | PRISM-Break! | Windows7sins

    “A wise man makes his own decisions; an ignorant man follows public opinion.” ― Chinese proverb

    “Every decent man is ashamed of the government he lives under.” ― H. L. Mencken

    “The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance.” ― Socrates

    “Damnant quod non intelligunt.” ― Latin proverb

    Quoted for truth:
    Quote Originally Posted by Alaron View Post
    Anatolian Urhemait supporters are mostly butthurt Meds.
    For the lulz:
    Quote Originally Posted by drgs View Post
    Poland is a misunderstanding. It is a country which lies on the frontier between western and slavic world, and which combines elements of both.
    In fact, they are not even the Europeans in strict sense, meaning European as in bearing the responsibility and understanding of European interests. Poland has always been an subordinate country, on one side sucking German dick, on the other side -- Russian one, some kind of "novice" europeans, who are full of inferiority complexes, hysteria and obsessity neuroses. This is also true for all Baltic countries

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