User Tag List

Page 22 of 22 FirstFirst ... 12 20 21 22
Results 211 to 218 of 218

Thread: Brazilian Genetic Discussion1007 days old

  1. #211
    Established Member
    Molecular Biologist
    Last Online
    2018-04-20 @ 15:58
    Join Date
    2016-05-26
    Posts
    748
    Gender
    Brazil

    Default

    http://repositorio.unb.br/bitstream/...eMOGodinho.pdf

    According 13 markers of CODIS system (seems to seems to overestimate the African contribution) I think Amerindian results maybe OK, I mean these results already appeared in other tests, not that I agree with them.


    African Ancestry

    Jamaica 90,3% (83,4% in other compilation*)
    Bahamas 85,2% (78,7% in other compilation*)
    Puerto Rico 26,4%
    Brazil 24,8%
    Colombia 20,3% (maybe 13%)
    Venezuela 16,3%
    Costa Rica 12,2%
    Peru 11,9%
    Mexico 10,1% (I think it is 3,5%)
    El Salvador 9,7%
    Argentina 9,0% (I think it is 2%)
    Chile 6,3% (I think it is 1,5%)

    *
    https://humanvarietiesdotorg.files.w...micadmix11.png

    On the other hand Amerindian ancestry seems to be on point with Puerto Rico being in the 13% range for Amerindian (many tests with this result), 42% for Chile, these countries are very homogeneous and these results repeat a lot. Maybe other more heteregeneous are more or less Amerindian.

    Good point is that I think Venezuela could be in the 60% Euro range (along w/ Paraguay too), all the videos I see in Venezuela, I see Whites around, I don't think Whites there are uncommon, or at least they are in much more number than in Colombia in my opinion.

  2. # ADS
    Advertisement bot
    Join Date
    2013-03-24
    Posts
    All threads
       
     

  3. #212
    Established Member
    Molecular Biologist
    Last Online
    2018-04-20 @ 15:58
    Join Date
    2016-05-26
    Posts
    748
    Gender
    Brazil

    Default

    About NA ancestry:

    Puerto Rico is about ~13,5% amerindian not 12%, Brazil is less (national results varies between 8% and 13%, less one that is Brazil is ~15% Amerindian, 25% African and 60% European, but not one Brazilian in that is over 92% European which is quite impossible since many people in South/Southeast are in this range 92-100%, also all Brazilians in that test had 4% Amerindian and SSA blood at the same time, a lot of Brazilians are less than 4% Amerindian/African).

    I've seen many Genetic Test about Brazil and I suspect that the Native American blood is around 8% in South/Southeast/Bahia and maybe in Pernambuco too. Ceará and other states like Rio Grande do Norte, Piaui, Sergipe around ~15% and Center-West maybe between 10-15%, less Mato Grosso that I think it is more. But the only part of Brazil that the Amerindian contribution is probably more than 20% is in the northern part of Brazil where it reaches around ~25-30%, but Northern Brazilians are 8% all Brazilians, no more.

    I think Brazil is 11% Native American (with most of Brazilians being less than 10% NA), over 13% is unlikely just like under 9% in my opinion, in some 23andme compilations, Brazil is in the 6% range amerindian even a bit less than Dominicans for example, but I need to see more tests and the Joinville Stroke test will say a lot about it, since this test contain cities like Sobral, Interior of Ceará, Campo Grande, MS and one city in the Interior of SP with a lot of SNP's.

    About this test of Uruguay:


    I didn't paid many attention to this test, but 160 AIM is very close to the 192 AIM from Pelotas so the result is prob. legit, but of couse there are many Uruguayans that are fully Euro and not only 96% Euro, so I if you add 4% to reach the 100% values to some Uruguayans would say that Montevideo would be 80,6% European, 12% Native American and 7,4% African.

    To be honest I think there is a many more Uruguayans Castizos and Mestizos than Afro-Uruguayans, but I personally don't think Uruguay is only 3% SSA, I think they are like 5%, but depend of the sample a lot of Uruguayans maybe the majority doesn't have significant Black African admix, the Native though seems to be stronger and more present in the Interior too. But 160 AIM is very OK, I was thought it was 48..
    Last edited by Montanini; 2018-02-02 at 04:53.

  4. #213
    Established Member
    Molecular Biologist
    Last Online
    2018-04-20 @ 15:58
    Join Date
    2016-05-26
    Posts
    748
    Gender
    Brazil

    Default

    Genome-wide association study of warfarin maintenance dose in a Brazilian sample


    The patients were attending anticoagulation clinics at two tertiary care institutions of the Brazilian Public Health System, namely the Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia Laranjeiras, a reference cardiology hospital located in Rio de Janeiro (n = 390) and the University Hospital of Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, in Porto Alegre (n = 488). Samples = 874


    Self-declaration in Rio de Janeiro (n= 390)


    - At least 279 of those 488 Porto-Alegrenses were self-declared White-Brazilians.
    http://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC3175513/

    Markers:The Biobank array has more than 650,000 variants, including 265,000 exome coding snps and indels, 70,000 novel loss-of-function SNPs and indels, 23,000 eQTLs, 2000 markers of pharmacogenomic relevance and 246,000 genome-wide association markers designed to ensure good genome-wide coverage in major populations, which make it possible to carry out imputation in order to increase the number of markers in the statistical analyses.

    The average European, African and Native American ancestry in the Brazilian sample were estimated as 76.8, 15.1 and 8.1%, respectively.

    Native American ancestry:


    African ancestry:



    http://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC4573240/

    Referencia para Colombianos, Puerto Riqueños e Mexicanos: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1306.4021.pdf

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Montanini For This Useful Post:

    cmv88 (2018-02-05)

  6. #214
    Established Member
    Race Scientist
    Last Online
    2018-02-05 @ 21:26
    Join Date
    2011-08-18
    Posts
    407
    Gender
    India Angola

    Default

    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2018/01/23/252155
    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/earl...52155.full.pdf
    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/bior...1/252155-1.pdf

    Candela study with more info

    Historical records and genetic analyses indicate that Latin Americans trace their ancestry mainly to the admixture of Native Americans, Europeans and Sub-Saharan Africans. Using novel haplotype-based methods here we infer the sub-populations involved in admixture for over 6,500 Latin Americans and evaluate the impact of sub-continental ancestry on the physical appearance of these individuals. We find that pre-Columbian Native genetic structure is mirrored in Latin Americans and that sources of non-Native ancestry, and admixture timings, match documented migratory flows. We also detect South/East Mediterranean ancestry across Latin America, probably stemming from the clandestine colonial migration of Christian converts of non-European origin (Conversos). Furthermore, we find that Central Andean ancestry impacts on variation of facial features in Latin Americans, particularly nose morphology, possibly relating to environmental adaptation during the evolution of Native Americans. (...)
    Allele-based analyses have previously documented that broad patterns of Native American population structure are detectable in admixed Latin Americans6,7. SOURCEFIND analysis extends these results by enabling the inference of 25 Native American ancestry components across Latin America, resulting in a high-resolution picture of Native variation in the region (Figures 1B and 2A) and emphasizing the “genetic continuity” of pre-Columbian and admixed populations across the Americas. In addition, SOURCEFIND distinguishes between closely-related ancestry components from the Iberian Peninsula, as well as from the East and South Mediterranean (including individuals self-identified as Sephardic; i.e. Iberian Jews). The distribution of European ancestry in the CANDELA sample shows a sharp differentiation between Brazil and the Spanish American countries (Fig. 1C). In Brazil the predominant European sub-component matches mostly the Portugal/West-Spain reference group while in Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Chile mostly Central/South-Spanish ancestry is inferred (Figures 1C and 2B). This differentiation matches the colonial history, Portuguese migration having concentrated in Eastern South America while the Spanish settled mainly in Central America and Western South America1. The relatively small contribution inferred for the Basque and Catalan agrees with historical information documenting that Spanish migrants to America originated mainly in Southern and Central Spain8. (...)




  7. The Following User Says Thank You to cmv88 For This Useful Post:

    Montanini (2018-02-06)

  8. #215
    Established Member
    Molecular Biologist
    Last Online
    2018-04-20 @ 15:58
    Join Date
    2016-05-26
    Posts
    748
    Gender
    Brazil

    Default

    Other study among Brazilians:

    Origins and dynamics of the Brazilian population and sickle cell mutations reveal unexpected diversity


    Samples: 2800/3000 from 6 cities, 4 states
    1500 markers








    https://reds-iii.rti.org/portals/0/p...7_Guo_GPP5.pdf

    https://reds-iii.rti.org/portals/0/p..._protected.pdf

    https://reds-iii.rti.org/ResearchStu...e2Studies.aspx

    https://reds-iii.rti.org/portals/0/p..._protected.pdf


    The sample was composed by basically Pardos and Blacks with very few White-Brazilians. Look at how different is these Brazilian population compared with other Latinos, one more Euro-African other more Euro-Amerindian, they don't overlap too much in this sample. And also very few White-Brazilians, I think a lot of people in these cities could cluster with CEU and IBS, TSI, but in this test I can't see one.

    Also I wouldn't guess over 8% amerindian for this sample and probably less since you hard can see one being more amerindian like you can see in the test Genome-wide association study of warfarin maintenance dose in a Brazilian sample. POST 213, a lot of people there should be almost strictly Euro-African.
    Last edited by Montanini; 2018-02-06 at 00:49.

  9. #216
    Established Member
    Molecular Biologist
    Last Online
    2018-04-20 @ 15:58
    Join Date
    2016-05-26
    Posts
    748
    Gender
    Brazil

    Default

    As expected since we already have seen the proportion of Italian and German surnames in Rio Grande do Sul, the Center-North or RGS (45%) is Italian-German with significant Portuguese and other ancestries, Porto Alegre region (45%) is Portuguese with significant Italian-German blood and the Southern part (10%) is mostly Portuguese with some Italian-German. In general they are more Portuguese than Italian-German and it fits almost perfectly with the study of surnames.

    Observation: a lot of students of Public Universities* in Brazil have quotas for Public School, low income and for afro-brazilians and in the UFRGS is pretty much the same thing, also I suspect that at least some samples were from the Brazilian army too.

    *In UFPR there are more quotistas than generals for example, Quase 60 % dos aprovados são oriundos de escolas públicas. 5.439 estudantes puderam comemorar uma vaga nos cursos da... + Black quotas....


    I think in the UFRGS is similar the UFRGS students are not exactly more European than people of there.

    This is an typical agglomeration to do the exam of UFRGS:


    These are the actual 'students':




  10. #217
    Established Member
    Molecular Biologist
    Last Online
    2018-04-20 @ 15:58
    Join Date
    2016-05-26
    Posts
    748
    Gender
    Brazil

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Montanini View Post
    Interesting to see:


    Distribuição por classes sociais (RM)

    TOP 10:

    Blumenau (SC) --- 93,99%
    Caxias do Sul (RS) --- 92,48%
    Florianópolis (SC) --- 90,83%
    Joinville (SC) --- 90,31%
    Itajaí-Balneário Camboriú (SC) --- 89,05%
    Criciúma (SC) --- 88,83%
    São José do Rio Preto (SP) --- 87,14%
    Araraquara-São Carlos (SP) --- 86,60%
    Maringá (PR) --- 86,44%
    Chapecó (SC) --- 86,41%
    http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1397168

    Municípios

    Municípios A+B+C

    Blumenau (SC) --- 94,15%
    Florianópolis (SC) --- 92,06%
    Caxias do Sul (RS) --- 91,77%
    Maringá (PR) --- 91,29%
    Joinville (SC) --- 90,65%
    Criciúma (SC) --- 90,24%
    Curitiba (PR) --- 89,76%
    Itajaí (SC) --- 89,34%
    São José do Rio Preto (SP) --- 88,41%
    Ribeirão Preto (SP) --- 88,26%
    http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...397168&page=13
    The four most euro states in Brazil are also the states with less % of people on Bolsa Familia (welfare/social program).


  11. #218
    Established Member
    Molecular Biologist Caipira's Avatar
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 21:52
    Join Date
    2014-01-13
    Posts
    665
    Gender
    Race
    Caucasoid
    Phenotype
    Mediterranid
    Politics
    Liberal conservative
    Religion
    Roman Catholicism
    Brazil Portugal 1485 Portugal Spain Castile Spain traditional Spain

    Default

    I can't argue with the things posted here based on genetic evidence etc. since I honestly don't understand anything at all on this subject, but I'd like to give my two cents on some things:

    There are some places on the "whitest" parts of Brazil that are not really that white. I'm talking about the oldest regions of São Paulo and South in terms of settlement. Actually, I don't know that much about the South since I only travelled to Curitiba, Northern Paraná and the Joinville region, but I can give info about São Paulo since I've travelled and lived in almost all the regions of this state.

    These older regions usually received less immigration during the 1880-1920s period than the regions settled later. I'm talking about cities such Sorocaba, Itu, Jundiaí, Itapetininga, Piracicaba, Taubaté, São José dos Campos, Jacaré, Pindamonhangaba, Guaratinguetá etc. and the tiny towns nearby (the cited cities have over 100.000 inhabitants and were settled between the 17th and 18th centuries, so they are not insignificant, with something like 4 or 5 million people living in all those regions combined). A lot of people living there are mostly from colonial stock, which means they have some good amount of amerindian background (checkout the 23andme tests from users tracing their background on those old cities). The paulistas (people from São Paulo region) were known for being very amerindian influenced, as many travellers from Europe and the USA such as Spix, Martius, Saint-Hilaire, Kidder etc wrote about in the 19th century (I can quote them if someone doubt it). Also, during the "coffee" era, all those cities had a large african population. Both amerindian and african influences on the population are still visible if you go there, with lots of caboclos (persons of white and amerindian background) and black people among its inhabitants. Many people claiming to be white in the census are actually castizos or something. I personally know quite a few.

    Since there are info about Pelotas, which is one of the oldest cities in Rio Grande do Sul and have historical similarities with the "traditional" regions of São Paulo, I would like to see the tests made with people from Sorocaba, for example, where most of it's inhabitants trace at least one or two ancestors from the 17th-18th centuries. I don't know if something like that even exist, since when they do such studies in São Paulo state, they use samples from the capital, where very few people have colonial ancestry. That would be interesting to see if the balance between white/amerindian/african influence changes a lot or nothing at all in São Paulo case (most whites in the capital or Campinas have little or none colonial ancestry, but in Sorocaba, with a population of almost 700.000 people, it's quite common).

    If someone have such studies, I would be glad to see.

    PS: I'm not criticizing the thread or something, which is very interesting. I'm just curious.

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to Caipira For This Useful Post:

    El Andullero (2019-02-17)

Page 22 of 22 FirstFirst ... 12 20 21 22

Similar Threads

  1. Mexican Genetic Discussion
    By Celph Titled in forum Americas
    Replies: 1219
    Last Post: 2019-07-23, 04:03
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 2016-08-04, 12:01
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 2012-08-28, 03:45
  4. Genetic vs Cultural identity discussion
    By jibarodepr in forum Race & Ethnicity in Society
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 2012-05-29, 18:38

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
<