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View Poll Results: Your favorite Finno-Ugric ethnicity?

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  • Khantis

    3 20.00%
  • Mansis

    0 0%
  • Komis

    0 0%
  • Udmurts

    0 0%
  • Maris

    0 0%
  • Erzas

    1 6.67%
  • Mokshas

    0 0%
  • Karelians

    1 6.67%
  • Finns

    2 13.33%
  • Votics, Izhorians, Vepses

    0 0%
  • Estonians

    2 13.33%
  • South-Estonians

    0 0%
  • Livs

    2 13.33%
  • Saami

    1 6.67%
  • Hungarians

    3 20.00%
  • I am FU myself but I am a (western, Scandndinavian, Germanic, American, Jewish etc) wannabe.

    0 0%
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Thread: Your favourite Finno-Ugric people958 days old

  1. #21
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    Molecular Biologist Rugevit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evi View Post
    And how about Norwegian symbols? They were influenced by Slavic and Baltic cultures too?
    Quite likely!

    Earliest Indo-European culture spread to central & western Europe from eastern Europe - from us. For example, ancient swastika symbol in Germany or Sweden is our influence.


    And Southern Khanty garment also has Balto-Slavic influences?

    Unless you can find examples of the garment pre-dating 150 years ago in the Khanty culture, I'd say it's Russian influence. You know Russians influenced you culturally a great deal.

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  3. #22
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    Eva!

    Some symbols , especially symbols in simple rhombus shapes are as old as 5,000 years. Look at the rhombus on the stomach. It’s typical to Latvian and Belarusian cultures. The artifact is around 5,000 years of age from Cucuteni-Trypillian culture.


    She's labeled as goddess of fertility by scholars. Of course, we don't know who she represented 5,000 years ago.




    Last edited by Rugevit; 2017-03-04 at 10:12.

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    Finnish Iron Age is most famous about weapons, people were warlike and tough, but also metal buckles are found everywhere in Finland, from the south to the north. Here two examples from the area we call now Lapland. Especially women used those buckles on their shoulders to bind tunic.



    Blog: http://terheninenmaa.blogspot.fi/, with essence "Believe me, or I'll nuke you".

    H39 - Thracia 1650 BC, Hungary 5000 BC
    I1 - Transdanubia 5000 BC

    Three simple facts about Finns:
    1. Baltic Finnic languages (including Finnish) never came from the Volga basin along with ancestors of present-day Finns.
    2. Finnish I1 (around 30% of all Finns) has Germanic roots from the late Bronze Age or the early Iron Age.
    3. As to the Finnish prehistory we have no evidences about any Iron Age (or later) east-to-west migration, but many unquestionable evidences about west-to-east migrations.

    Väinämöinen - R1a
    Lemminkäinen - I1
    Joukahainen - N

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    Rugevit (2017-03-04)

  6. #24
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    Livs of course
    I live on their land, and most likely I have some genes from these guys too, if not me then my kids definitely

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    Huck Finn (2017-03-04)

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    Quote Originally Posted by parastais View Post
    Livs of course
    I live on their land, and most likely I have some genes from these guys too, if not me then my kids definitely
    Unless I see the Livs speaking Livian I won't believe there were in Latvia.

  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rugevit View Post
    Quite likely!

    Earliest Indo-European culture spread to central & western Europe from eastern Europe - from us. For example, ancient swastika symbol in Germany or Sweden is our influence.

    Unless you can find examples of the garment pre-dating 150 years ago in the Khanty culture, I'd say it's Russian influence. You know Russians influenced you culturally a great deal.
    OK, and how would you explain fact, that Turkic speaking folks (maybe except Chuvashes) basically don't have those geometric symbols, no matter how much they interacted with Slavic people???

    The Siberian Tatars are southern neighbours of Khanty people, yet their ornaments and symbols are basically from another world. Tatars and Khanty both were interacting with Russians (and Tatars probably even more, because they had more sedimentary lifestyle).

    Another thing is that Southern Khanty ornamentation resembles more Udmurt, Erzya etc. ornamentation (basically Finno-Ugric folks) than Russian one.

    However, there is some Russian influence in Southern Khanty emboidery, though, but it is quite easy to tell apart (there is one style of sewing, which is specifically called "Russian stiching").

    Here BTW is a nice blog post about the Southern Khanty embroidery:

    http://folkcostume.blogspot.fi/2011/...alk-today.html


    And here you can browse Southern Khanty online collection in Finnish museum:

    http://suomenmuseotonline.fi/fi/sela...it&pageIndex=2


    And here you can see wearers of those clothes:

    http://humus.livejournal.com/3638913.html

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by Rugevit View Post
    Unless I see the Livs speaking Livian I won't believe there were in Latvia.
    I have met Livonian people speaking Livonian language in Latvia.
    Last edited by Evi; 2017-03-04 at 17:38.

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    Rugevit (2017-03-04)

  11. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by parastais View Post
    Livs of course
    I live on their land, and most likely I have some genes from these guys too, if not me then my kids definitely
    I like the landscape of ancient Livonia, both garden like river valleys such as Gauja region and also Kurzeme area, with all those sandy beaches and sea breaze.

  12. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evi View Post
    OK, and how would you explain fact, that Turkic speaking folks (maybe except Chuvashes) basically don't have those geometric symbols, no matter how much they interacted with Slavic people???

    The Siberian Tatars are southern neighbours of Khanty people, yet their ornaments and symbols are basically from another world. Tatars and Khanty both were interacting with Russians (and Tatars probably even more, because they had more sedimentary lifestyle).

    Another thing is that Southern Khanty ornamentation resembles more Udmurt, Erzya etc. ornamentation (basically Finno-Ugric folks) than Russian one.

    However, there is some Russian influence in Southern Khanty emboidery, though, but it is quite easy to tell apart (there is one style of sewing, which is specifically called "Russian stiching").

    Here BTW is a nice blog post about the Southern Khanty embroidery:

    http://folkcostume.blogspot.fi/2011/...alk-today.html


    And here you can browse Southern Khanty online collection in Finnish museum:

    http://suomenmuseotonline.fi/fi/sela...it&pageIndex=2


    And here you can see wearers of those clothes:

    http://humus.livejournal.com/3638913.html

    - - - Updated - - -
    Tatars were Muslims from early stage. Perhaps, Islam made the community conservative about their culture. Kazan Tatars are also immediate geographic and genetic cousins of Chuvashes and Maris who are not as conservative.


    Thanks for examples of beautiful southern Khanty embroidery. In general the symbols do not look Slavic except for Swastika and Auseklis.



    I have met Livonian people speaking Livonian language in Latvia.
    Were those Livonian people you met learned the language at Universities? There are no more native Livonian speakers according to this source.




    The last native Livonian speaker died in 2013, which makes Livonian the latest European language casualty of globalization! Grizelda Kristina fought with all her heart to preserve her language, but she finally passed away in Canada at age 103!

  13. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rugevit View Post
    Tatars were Muslims from early stage. Perhaps, Islam made the community conservative about their culture. Kazan Tatars are also immediate geographic and genetic cousins of Chuvashes and Maris who are not as conservative.
    If Maris and Chuvashes weren't conservative, why didn't they take also Tatar ornament motives over? Historically they were actually more in touch with Tatars than with Russians. Yet you can almost draw the linguistic line with the help of ornaments in the Volga-Ural region. No, there must be some other explanation for the ornamental variety.

    Thanks for examples of beautiful southern Khanty embroidery. In general the symbols do not look Slavic except for Swastika and Auseklis.
    In fact many symbols in Volga-Ural region also don't look Slavic, if you just take a closer look at them.

    Were those Livonian people you met learned the language at Universities? There are no more native Livonian speakers according to this source.
    Those people, I met, learned Livonian language in childhood. They were actually brother and sister, and learned the language from their grandfather. Maybe Livonian language isn't their primary language, but they learned it from family member, and not from some school or university.

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    Another common buckle profile in Finland so called crab buckle. The variation seen in this picture was invented in Finland. On the bottom left the original form, which was a northern variant of old Roman buckles. Other buckles in picture represent the style unique for Iron Age Finland.

    Blog: http://terheninenmaa.blogspot.fi/, with essence "Believe me, or I'll nuke you".

    H39 - Thracia 1650 BC, Hungary 5000 BC
    I1 - Transdanubia 5000 BC

    Three simple facts about Finns:
    1. Baltic Finnic languages (including Finnish) never came from the Volga basin along with ancestors of present-day Finns.
    2. Finnish I1 (around 30% of all Finns) has Germanic roots from the late Bronze Age or the early Iron Age.
    3. As to the Finnish prehistory we have no evidences about any Iron Age (or later) east-to-west migration, but many unquestionable evidences about west-to-east migrations.

    Väinämöinen - R1a
    Lemminkäinen - I1
    Joukahainen - N

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