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Thread: A fully organic retinal prosthesis restores vision in a rat model of degenerative blindness921 days old

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    Default A fully organic retinal prosthesis restores vision in a rat model of degenerative blindness

    Abstract

    The degeneration of photoreceptors in the retina is one of the major causes of adult blindness in humans. Unfortunately, no effective clinical treatments exist for the majority of retinal degenerative disorders. Here we report on the fabrication and functional validation of a fully organic prosthesis for long-term in vivo subretinal implantation in the eye of Royal College of Surgeons rats, a widely recognized model of retinitis pigmentosa. Electrophysiological and behavioural analyses reveal a prosthesis-dependent recovery of light sensitivity and visual acuity that persists up to 6–10 months after surgery. The rescue of the visual function is accompanied by an increase in the basal metabolic activity of the primary visual cortex, as demonstrated by positron emission tomography imaging. Our results highlight the possibility of developing a new generation of fully organic, highly biocompatible and functionally autonomous photovoltaic prostheses for subretinal implants to treat degenerative blindness.

    http://www.nature.com/nmat/journal/v.../nmat4874.html

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    Junior Member Wolfwind's Avatar
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    I don't have full access to the website and can only read the abstract.
    I'm just curious how they blinded the rats.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfwind View Post
    I don't have full access to the website and can only read the abstract.
    I'm just curious how they blinded the rats.
    I don't have access to the article either. The rat known as "the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat" was bred to develop retinal degeneration as per this article.
    https://www.sciencealert.com/scienti...on-to-millions


    Also


    The Royal College of Surgeons rat: an animal model for inherited retinal degeneration with a still unknown genetic defect.


    Abstract


    The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat is the first known animal with inherited retinal degeneration. Despite the fact that the genetic defect is not known, the RCS rat is widely used for research in hereditary retinal dystrophies. This review tries to summarize observations which have been made in the RCS rat and to make an attempt to formulate candidate genes which may the cause for the retinal degeneration in this rat strain. The genetic defect in RCS rats causes the inability of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) to phagocytose shed photoreceptor outer segments. In normal rats or humans, this circadian process is regulated by both the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and the calcium/ inositol phosphate systems. The calcium/inositol phosphate system seems to be linked to the phagocytosis receptors which recognize photoreceptor outer membranes to initialize phagocytosis. The cAMP system appeared as modulator of the regulation of phagocytosis. An increase in the intracellular cAMP concentration is an 'off' signal for phagocytosis. In RPE cells from RCS rats many observations have been made which indicate a changed second messenger metabolism concerning both the cAMP and the calcium/inositol phosphate systems. The genetic defect seems to concern a protein which is involved in the initialization of a second messenger pathway. We conclude that the genes coding for the phagocytosis receptor or for proteins which are linked to receptors (for example G proteins) are good candidates for defective genes in RCS rats.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9831756

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rugevit View Post
    I don't have access to the article either. The rat known as "the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat" was bred to develop retinal degeneration as per this article.
    https://www.sciencealert.com/scienti...on-to-millions


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    Ah thanks

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    The artificial retina is a great breakthrough with a potential to restore vision to millions of blind people.

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