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Thread: Genetic origins of the Minoans and Mycenaeans (Lazaridis et al. 2017)79 days old

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    Molecular Biologist tauromenion's Avatar
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    Why is it that sometimes the increased Sardinian type affinity (25% or so compared to a modern Sicilian or Cretan) shows up in Mycenaeans' results and other times it does not?

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    Quote Originally Posted by tauromenion View Post
    I would imagine it is similar to a modern person from Laconia/Mani area. It is definitely northward shifted compared to modern Cretans or southern Italians, and does seem to have elevated NE European affinity, but we have no idea if the NE European in modern Greeks is from that admixture event or if a later one, or both.

    But I do believe a NE European element higher than that of Mycenaeans existed in classical Greece and was spread to Sicily by Greek settlers, because the areas of higher Doric influence like southern Apulia, Syracuse, Ragusa today have a higher NE European element than what is normal for southern Italy -- though it is nowhere near that of modern Greeks.
    U think she"s Doric? Not to early early in time for Dorics to be that far south?

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    I have just discovered my old post from the EastPole thread:

    Quote Originally Posted by Wojewoda
    This is off-topic here, but Greeks look like Cypriots "invaded" by the people of the Vatya culture (while Cypriots look like a simple cross between Caucasus hunter-gatherers and Anatolian Neolithic farmers).
    The shift to cremation rather than interment around 1300 BC, gave archaeologists a name for the burgeoning Urnfield culture. The typical Urnfield burial used a urn to contain the ashes of the desceased, capped by an upturned bowl, set into a pit. The usage had spread over much of Europe by 1000 BC.

    Any type of cremation was uncommon earlier over most of Europe except the Carpathian Basin, where it appears among the Makó and Bell Beaker groups as early as c. 2700 to 2400 BC. So this region has often been considered the starting point for the Urnfield tradition. Two of the Middle Bronze Age cultures of Hungary favoured cremation, but only one of them placed a capped burial urn in a pit. That was the Vatya Culture of sheep-breeders living in the settlements along the Danube. These were well-placed for trading, as well as having good grazing land nearby. So the idea could easily have travelled up the Danube to the trading nexus at its head. From there it spread west and north into Germany and Poland and south into Italy. Finally it moved into France and part of Spain. There was also a transition to cremation burial in Scandinavia and the British Isles in the Late Bronze Age, but without the vast cemeteries of Continental Europe.


    And an EastPole's PCA plot which inspired my comment:



    What was happening in this Hungarian Bronze Age:

    Quote Originally Posted by Litvin
    Modeling Slavs as mixtures of >100 ancients:

    I'm using the same settings, parameters and the same >100 ancient samples in every run. One consistent pattern is that Hungarian BA and Lithuanian BA samples show up all the time:
    ?
    Last edited by Wojewoda; 2017-08-18 at 20:07.

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