User Tag List

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4
Results 31 to 37 of 37

Thread: Is German-American ancestry really the most common ancestry in the US?427 days old

  1. #31
    Established Member
    Molecular Biologist
    Last Online
    2019-07-02 @ 00:13
    Join Date
    2017-08-06
    Posts
    346
    Location
    Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    Gender
    Age
    22
    Race
    Europid
    Phenotype
    Mediterranid
    Metaethnos
    Romance
    Ethnicity
    Iberian + Italian
    Phenotype
    Med + Alpine
    Brazil Portugal Italy

    Default

    Nope, English is bigger, just less reported.
    And many of these German-Americans aren't full blooded German.

    Americans tend to overestimate their German, Irish ancestry... and dowgrade the English and Scottish.
    I think it's because of these three reasons:
    -English ancestry is distant/colonial, which makes people forget about it or not being aware. It also happens in Hispanic America with Spanish colonial ancestry and in Brazil with Portuguese ancestry.
    -English is the founding stock, the ones that defined the US, so many people might not identify with it because it's the normal ethnic group, they are just "American".
    -Americans fought against England in order to have their independence, so it might not make much sense to identify with their English ancestry.

  2. # ADS
    Advertisement bot
    Join Date
    2013-03-24
    Location
    ForumBiodiversity.com
    Age
    2010
    Posts
    All threads
       
     

  3. #32
    Established Member
    Den Svarta Vikingen CWF's Avatar
    Last Online
    2019-02-23 @ 20:55
    Join Date
    2010-02-23
    Posts
    2,258
    Location
    USA
    Gender
    Y-DNA
    I1d
    mtDNA
    B2
    Race
    Triracial
    Metaethnos
    Afro-Viking AmerIndian
    Ethnicity
    Black/African American
    Phenotype
    FAIL! Try genetics.
    Sweden African Union(OAS) United States United States Eastern Band Cherokee Cuba

    Default

    Actually, most people who claim German that I know are well aware of where their ancestors came from. It is very well documented where European immigrants settled in the U.S. and they all usually came from one city, town, village or area in Europe and settled in large numbers in the place they emigrated to in the U.S. The names of families frequently became the name of the town or city or area in the U.S.

    To me there doesn't seem to be a lot of confusion or guessing about this. It's fairly well documented history.

  4. #33
    Junior Member
    Last Online
    2019-01-19 @ 22:04
    Join Date
    2018-12-01
    Posts
    7
    Gender
    Age
    27
    Race
    Sub-Saharan African
    Ethnicity
    Black
    Religion
    Christian
    Congo Democratic Republic Belgium

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CWF View Post
    Actually, most people who claim German that I know are well aware of where their ancestors came from. It is very well documented where European immigrants settled in the U.S. and they all usually came from one city, town, village or area in Europe and settled in large numbers in the place they emigrated to in the U.S. The names of families frequently became the name of the town or city or area in the U.S.

    To me there doesn't seem to be a lot of confusion or guessing about this. It's fairly well documented history.
    The problem is more so about people who don't reported English ancestry because they don't aware. It's interesting because I don't think we talk a lot about German influence in the media, we hear more about the Irish influence, I even thought Irish was the largest ancestry before I look a the numbers.

  5. #34
    Established Member
    Lord of Asgard Odin's Avatar
    Last Online
    2019-07-15 @ 00:30
    Join Date
    2018-05-08
    Posts
    1,200
    Location
    West Coast
    Gender
    Age
    29
    Race
    Europid
    Metaethnos
    Germanic
    Ethnicity
    American
    Phenotype
    Nordo-Cromagnid
    Politics
    Paleoconservatism
    Religion
    Christian
    Viking Norway Denmark Netherlands United States

    Default


  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Odin For This Useful Post:

    Latinus (2019-02-05)

  7. #35
    Established Member
    Master procrastinator JaM's Avatar
    Last Online
    @
    Join Date
    2009-10-30
    Posts
    4,795
    Location
    East Doggerland
    Gender
    Metaethnos
    Doggerlandic
    Ethnicity
    South Norse
    Phenotype
    Kostenkioid
    Politics
    Relativism
    Religion
    None
    Denmark Viking Finland Spain Castile

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CWF View Post
    Actually, most people who claim German that I know are well aware of where their ancestors came from. It is very well documented where European immigrants settled in the U.S. and they all usually came from one city, town, village or area in Europe and settled in large numbers in the place they emigrated to in the U.S. The names of families frequently became the name of the town or city or area in the U.S.

    To me there doesn't seem to be a lot of confusion or guessing about this. It's fairly well documented history.
    I've read about this quite a bit, from the perspective of the countries people migrated from. I know for a fact that "German" was what people were labeled as in Ellis Island and wherever else they came through, as long as they traveled from Germany. So in fact some people who were German in the US were not actually German at all, they just came via Germany. This happened because of German unification and expansion. Basically the ever changing borders of Central Europe. People even tended to change their names.

    Apart from that it is probably true, most people who report German DO indeed have "some" German ancestry, and they know about this ancestry because it is recent. However, as mentioned before, they may have a more significant portion of other ancestry which they do not know much about, since the majority of German migration was relatively recent, while the other ancestry may be older. In reports I've read, it was noted that some ethnicities, including most Germans, tended to assimilate totally into the American general society, and intermarry a lot with the generic Americans.

  8. #36
    Established Member
    Den Svarta Vikingen CWF's Avatar
    Last Online
    2019-02-23 @ 20:55
    Join Date
    2010-02-23
    Posts
    2,258
    Location
    USA
    Gender
    Y-DNA
    I1d
    mtDNA
    B2
    Race
    Triracial
    Metaethnos
    Afro-Viking AmerIndian
    Ethnicity
    Black/African American
    Phenotype
    FAIL! Try genetics.
    Sweden African Union(OAS) United States United States Eastern Band Cherokee Cuba

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JaM View Post
    I've read about this quite a bit, from the perspective of the countries people migrated from. I know for a fact that "German" was what people were labeled as in Ellis Island and wherever else they came through, as long as they traveled from Germany. So in fact some people who were German in the US were not actually German at all, they just came via Germany. This happened because of German unification and expansion. Basically the ever changing borders of Central Europe. People even tended to change their names.

    Apart from that it is probably true, most people who report German DO indeed have "some" German ancestry, and they know about this ancestry because it is recent. However, as mentioned before, they may have a more significant portion of other ancestry which they do not know much about, since the majority of German migration was relatively recent, while the other ancestry may be older. In reports I've read, it was noted that some ethnicities, including most Germans, tended to assimilate totally into the American general society, and intermarry a lot with the generic Americans.
    ????? Ellis Island? Ellis Island is just one of many immigration points for the U.S. and it only operated for 65 years starting in 1892. Swedish and German immigrants were settling in the U.S. Southwest and Northeast long before that. Maybe you're looking at something that is just factually focused on Ellis Island but that's just a one part of U.S. immigration history.

  9. #37
    Established Member
    Master procrastinator JaM's Avatar
    Last Online
    @
    Join Date
    2009-10-30
    Posts
    4,795
    Location
    East Doggerland
    Gender
    Metaethnos
    Doggerlandic
    Ethnicity
    South Norse
    Phenotype
    Kostenkioid
    Politics
    Relativism
    Religion
    None
    Denmark Viking Finland Spain Castile

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CWF View Post
    ????? Ellis Island? Ellis Island is just one of many immigration points for the U.S. and it only operated for 65 years starting in 1892. Swedish and German immigrants were settling in the U.S. Southwest and Northeast long before that. Maybe you're looking at something that is just factually focused on Ellis Island but that's just a one part of U.S. immigration history.
    I have read that many of the immigrants, with no particular immigration facility mentioned, were reported as Germans due to nationality. Whether that only applied to Ellis Island immigration I don't know, so you could be right - it could've been different earlier and depend on where they came through .

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 87
    Last Post: 2014-05-05, 20:32
  2. Typical Dr. Mcdonald report for Germans/people of German ancestry
    By FeistyGermanGhost in forum Genetic DNA Companies
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 2012-07-27, 15:42
  3. Guess his Ancestry (german or brit)
    By smartguy in forum Guess Ethnicity
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 2011-11-01, 14:10
  4. How did german ancestry became the most common throughout the US?
    By Debian in forum Race & Ethnicity in Society
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: 2011-04-15, 23:05
  5. USA % on Ancestry Finder (23&me) for non-american persons
    By oditous in forum Genetic DNA Companies
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 2011-02-04, 07:53

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
<