User Tag List

Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 6 7 8
Results 71 to 79 of 79

Thread: Curly hair on Europeans3014 days old

  1. #71
    Wiki Editor
    Established Member
    Most Hated Member DragonRouge's Avatar
    Last Online
    @
    Join Date
    2010-02-08
    Posts
    7,211
    Location
    America's Hat
    Gender
    Y-DNA
    Male relatives J1c3
    mtDNA
    U5a2c
    Metaethnos
    Métis-Souriquois
    Ethnicity
    Acadian
    Politics
    Meh
    Religion
    Atheist
    Canada Canada Acadia Canada Quebec Basque Faroe Islands Viking

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Itoli View Post
    More importantly, none of our living animal relatives have kinky hair. It seems to be a fairly recent and unique mutations. Afaik, I don't think there's a single non-human animal which has a tightly curled hair type which wasn't bred that way by humans.
    Cats have kinky hairs under their straight hair, kind of like an undercoat, and for cats it serves for thermoregulation. Next time you’re petting a cat, look at their fur closely. That hair of that undercoat is similar to human curly hair, meaning, oval shaped, while the top layer of fur, called the guard hair, is straight and the follicles are circle.

    Cat fur is a lot softer than human hair, however.

    Here are some kittens without guard hairs. This particular breed (Devon Rex) was bred to have the curly hair (no guard hairs), but all cats have that layer of curly hair:



    Cats were one of the first domesticated animals, however, we didn’t domesticate them, they domesticated themselves, pretty much evolving on their own from their African wildcat ancestors to live among humans (a cat’s meow is at the same frequency as a human baby, a frequency which immediately triggers a “care response” in humans... they evolved to be able to manipulate us, pretty much) since it was easier to just follow humans and eat their scraps or suck up to humans to get fed than to hunt. Domesticated cats first appeared in the same part of Africa as humans and spread throughout the world by following them.
    Last edited by DragonRouge; 2018-01-21 at 05:32.

  2. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to DragonRouge For This Useful Post:

    a_garcia49 (2018-01-21), Itoli (2018-01-21), Power77 (2018-02-03)

  3. # ADS
    Advertisement bot
    Join Date
    2013-03-24
    Location
    ForumBiodiversity.com
    Posts
    All threads
       
     

  4. #72
    Established Member
    Molecular Biologist Itoli's Avatar
    Last Online
    @
    Join Date
    2017-04-16
    Posts
    902
    Gender

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DragonRouge View Post
    Cats have kinky hairs under their straight hair, kind of like an undercoat, and for cats it serves for thermoregulation. Next time you’re petting a cat, look at their fur closely. That hair of that undercoat is similar to human curly hair, meaning, oval shaped, while the top layer of fur, called the guard hair, is straight and the follicles are circle.

    Cat fur is a lot softer than human hair, however.

    Here are some kittens without guard hairs. This particular breed (Devon Rex) was bred to have the curly hair (no guard hairs), but all cats have that layer of curly hair:



    Cats were one of the first domesticated animals, however, we didn’t domesticate them, they domesticated themselves, pretty much evolving on their own from their African wildcat ancestors to live among humans (a cat’s meow is at the same frequency as a human baby, a frequency which immediately triggers a “care response” in humans... they evolved to be able to manipulate us, pretty much) since it was easier to just follow humans and eat their scraps or suck up to humans to get fed than to hunt. Domesticated cats first appeared in the same part of Africa as humans and spread throughout the world by following them.
    Cat's were self domesticated but they have gone on to be further bred by humans to select for further desirable physical and behavioral traits e.g. the bengal cat's leopard like markings:



    besides that, that's not really like afro hair though. If you look closely it's more like small frizzy waves rather than small, tight frizzy curls.
    Last edited by Itoli; 2018-01-21 at 08:51.

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Itoli For This Useful Post:

    DragonRouge (2018-01-21), Power77 (2018-02-03)

  6. #73
    Regular Member
    Junior Member
    Last Online
    2018-01-21 @ 08:33
    Join Date
    2017-08-31
    Posts
    23
    Gender

    Default

    My mother is Dutch and Danish and has very curly hair. As a result, I (mixed with Congolese), have extremely kinky hair. I have seen sandy blonde curls on many Europeans, especially Norwegians, and Austrians, for some reason.

  7. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to naomikiabonde For This Useful Post:

    DragonRouge (2018-01-21), EliasAlucard (2018-01-21), Power77 (2018-02-03)

  8. #74
    Wiki Editor
    Established Member
    Most Hated Member DragonRouge's Avatar
    Last Online
    @
    Join Date
    2010-02-08
    Posts
    7,211
    Location
    America's Hat
    Gender
    Y-DNA
    Male relatives J1c3
    mtDNA
    U5a2c
    Metaethnos
    Métis-Souriquois
    Ethnicity
    Acadian
    Politics
    Meh
    Religion
    Atheist
    Canada Canada Acadia Canada Quebec Basque Faroe Islands Viking

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Itoli View Post
    Cat's were self domesticated but they have gone on to be further bred by humans to select for further desirable physical and behavioral traits e.g. the bengal cat's leopard like markings:



    besides that, that's not really like afro hair though. If you look closely it's more like small frizzy waves rather than small, tight frizzy curls.
    The selective breeding in domestic cats, which created different breeds, happened way later in their evolution, and the domestic cat's ancestor, the African wildcat, also has this pattern of guard hairs on top of curly hairs. Same with just run of the mill house cats, domestic shorthairs and longhairs, which have not undergone the same selective breeding.

    And yeah, it is not like Afro hair, but I'd say pretty close, same follicle shape... the straight hair on cats isn't like straight human hair either. Probably for animals, the hair closest to human hair is horse hair, hence why horse hair is used to make wigs and hair extensions, and hair care products for horses are quite popular among humans (I am a fan of Mane n' Tail products myself).

    What's interesting about cats is that they have a similar pattern of continental variation as humans (what in humans, is mistaken for being different races), this is even despite selective breeding by humans.

    African wildcat:



    Domestic relative (Sokoke):



    European wildcat:



    Domestic relative (Norwegian forest cat):



    North Asian wildcat:



    Domestic relative (Persian):



    South Asian wildcat:



    Domestic relative (Singapura)




    Chinese wildcat:



    Domestic relative (Dragon Li)



    All the wildcats are Felis silvestris silvestris and their domestic counterparts are Felis silvestris catus, like all humans are Homo sapiens sapiens, but there seems to be a regional variation in how they look. Could be because they followed humans, I am guessing.

    I would say that the difference between Felis silvestris silvestris and Felis silvestris catus more constitutes what a "race" is than the continental differences between humans and cats do. Felis silvestris silvestris evolved to be a highly efficient hunter, having even a higher percentage of successful kills than big cats like lions and tigers, while Felis silvestris catus evolved traits specific to making them more able to interact with and get what they need to survive from humans, like their meow registering at a frequency that is impossible for humans to ignore or tune out (this is why a baby crying on an airplane is so annoying and a baby crying or a cat meowing at 3 am always wakes you up, sounds at this frequency are used for torture for this reason)... Felis silvestris silvestris and other meowing wildcats (cheetahs, lynxes, etc) have a lower pitched meow that humans can tune out.
    Last edited by DragonRouge; 2018-01-21 at 18:44.

  9. #75
    Established Member
    Molecular Biologist
    Last Online
    2018-06-15 @ 22:45
    Join Date
    2017-11-16
    Posts
    314
    Gender

    Default

    What is the reason why Scandinavians, Balts, and North-Slavs have by my guesses 75% straight hair, 20% wavy hair, and 5% curly hair, as opposed to British Islanders who by my guesses have 40% straight hair, 40% wavy hair, and 20% curly hair.

    In this aspect, at least the many Irish I've encountered here, are just as curly haired, and wavy haired as the many Southern Italians I've encountered here.

    Is there a reason for this?

  10. #76
    Established Member
    Molecular Biologist
    Last Online
    2018-06-15 @ 22:45
    Join Date
    2017-11-16
    Posts
    314
    Gender

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by windie View Post
    In a collier's encyclopedia they describe the Khoisan as having some thing call 'peppercorn hair'.

    Some Irish people have frizzly and curly hair. With Oceanic. I think some people forget Black people are not the only people with Afro hair. Most Melanesian also have this same hair type. In fact the same hair products can be use on black and Melanesian hair.
    http://www.melanesianhair.com/
    Yes, Irish people have quite a bit of frizzy, and curly hair.

    The hair texture of Irish people seems to be more like that of Ashkenazi Jews, than to say a Swede, or Pole.

    Some might say that it's from "Asiatic" mixture, but how much of Swedish, and Polish mixture is Asiatic, perhaps 1-5% judging by Siberian components, or N haplogroup?

    Also the hair texture of Swedes, and Poles is different, with many having thin fine straight hair, as opposed to Mongoloid's who have typically thick straight hair.

    Then there's the aspect of Swedes, and Poles having lots of blonde hair, and basically none in Mongoloid's.

    I fail to see how the differences between more Continental Europeans compared to Irish could possibly be because of Mongoloids.

  11. #77
    Wiki Editor
    Established Member
    Most Hated Member DragonRouge's Avatar
    Last Online
    @
    Join Date
    2010-02-08
    Posts
    7,211
    Location
    America's Hat
    Gender
    Y-DNA
    Male relatives J1c3
    mtDNA
    U5a2c
    Metaethnos
    Métis-Souriquois
    Ethnicity
    Acadian
    Politics
    Meh
    Religion
    Atheist
    Canada Canada Acadia Canada Quebec Basque Faroe Islands Viking

    Default

    Come to think of it, I posted a lot about cats in this thread and their fur pattern, curly undercoat consisting of down hairs and awn hairs, then a top layer of straight guard hairs.

    I wonder if, early human ancestors, when we had fur all over our bodies, had all these types of hairs, and when our ancestors lost their fur, they kept their down and awn hairs, which are the curly layers, and Afro-textured hair is essentially awn hairs in their original form. Curly-haired cats do not have guard hairs, after all. Curly-haired dog breeds do not have guard hairs, either. It cannot be down hairs, since down hairs do not grow very long and are very soft.. maybe "baby hairs" that humans have are down hairs. Awn hairs are where most animals get their hair/fur colour and texture from.

    Here is a hairstyle displaying baby hairs, you can see, it appears to be under the rest of her hair.



    Baby hairs are often associated with people of African descent, probably because they are featured in traditional hairstyles more often, but all humans have baby hairs.

    Humans do not have guard hairs, although we used to, this is why we get goosebumps which is pretty much a vestigial trait... it's a reaction to fear or cold, where an animal will puff out their guard hairs to either keep warm or to look bigger in order to scare away whatever startled them.

    Straight hair in humans is obviously not guard hairs, since mammals have the ability to do that with guard hairs.




  12. #78
    Established Member
    Evolutionary Biologist
    Last Online
    2018-08-15 @ 21:58
    Join Date
    2017-08-06
    Posts
    230
    Location
    Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    Gender
    Age
    21
    Race
    Europid
    Phenotype
    Mediterranid
    Metaethnos
    Romance
    Ethnicity
    Iberian + Italian
    Phenotype
    Med + Alpine
    Brazil Portugal Italy

    Default

    I think it's more common among Western than Eastern Euros. I assume Eastern Euros are more homogeneous in hair texture: straight.

  13. #79
    Established Member
    Evolutionary Biologist
    Last Online
    2018-08-15 @ 21:58
    Join Date
    2017-08-06
    Posts
    230
    Location
    Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    Gender
    Age
    21
    Race
    Europid
    Phenotype
    Mediterranid
    Metaethnos
    Romance
    Ethnicity
    Iberian + Italian
    Phenotype
    Med + Alpine
    Brazil Portugal Italy

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Celph Titled View Post
    This reminds me of an anthro forum member I bought a 23andMe ancestry DNA kit to prove he didn't have black, because his hair texture was that of a biracial person and I just couldn't believe a white person could have such hair texture. He had also posted a picture of his dad or grandfather with an Afro. It turned out he was a white boy genetically with no ssa ancestry.

    That is when I began to understand that whites can have such hair texture without being mix
    I didn't mind wasting my money on an European from Norway, because this helped me educate myself more in regards to European hair texture
    Some people are even more extreme. They assume whites can only have straight hair. Yep, I have seen people claiming that even wavy hair is not a white trait. But these people were dumb Brazilians that never studied Racial Anthropology and have never set their foot in Europe. It's one thing to say Mongoloids are homogeneous in hair texture (straight), but to say the same thing about whites is pretty stupid.

Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 6 7 8

Similar Threads

  1. How All Europeans Became White in America
    By JackKnightstick in forum History
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 2012-10-15, 21:11
  2. What is your hair color?
    By Sevastopol in forum Other
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 2012-04-09, 21:02
  3. What can europeans expect from muslims?
    By Ulf in forum Race & Ethnicity in Society
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 2010-05-12, 16:47
  4. Why are all my Y-dna matches on FTDNA Europeans?
    By ChechenRebelZ in forum y-DNA Haplogroups
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 2010-05-11, 04:05
  5. Why Do Europeans Have So Many Hair and Eye Colors?
    By Anodyne in forum Physical Anthropology
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 2010-01-17, 01:36

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
<