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View Poll Results: Do you know the names of all four of your grandparents?

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Thread: Do You Know Your Family History? Third Of Americans Can’t Even Name All 4 Grandparents, Survey Finds131 days old

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    Question Do You Know Your Family History? Third Of Americans Can’t Even Name All 4 Grandparents, Survey Finds

    NEW YORK — How much do you know about your family tree? For many folks, it’s not very much. A recent survey finds that a third of Americans can’t even name all four of their grandparents, incredibly.

    While DNA kits that trace one’s ancestry have surged in popularity over the years, there are still plenty of people who don’t seem to care too much about where they came from. The survey of 2,000 Americans showed that a third of respondents struggled to climb the branches of their family tree beyond their grandparents.

    One in five couldn’t even name one of their great-grandparents.

    “In recent decades, we’ve seen a major upswing in interest when it comes to researching family history, and this is largely due to the accessibility of historical information,” says Jennifer Utley, Director of Research at Ancestry.com, which commissioned the survey, in a statement. “This valuable historical data is helping people paint a picture of their past.”

    It wasn’t just names of relatives that respondents failed to come up with either. A fifth didn’t know the city that any of their grandparents were born in, and 14 percent had no idea what their grandparents even did for a living.

    On the bright side, many participants have put in the time and effort to learn about their background. Half of those surveyed say they’ve researched their heritage be it through family tree books, official records, or using an online service. Six out of ten also are aware of the country their last name comes from, and 65 percent were able to name the country or countries their relatives came to America from.

    Thankfully, most do wish they knew more: eight in ten say they care about their family history and feel it’s important to find out where they came from. Utley says it’s easier than it seems, it just requires a little bit of work and outreach.

    “Most family history research starts with oral history, listening to the stories passed down from generation to generation,” she says. “Conversations during holiday gatherings can help us discover more than just what country our relatives migrated from, but also who they were as individuals – their stories, their dreams and lessons learned.”

    As for what kind of information participants said they’d like to learn from their grandparents or great-grandparents, 72 percent were interested in hearing stories of them from when they were young, 62 percent wanted to know where their family came from, and half simply wanted some life advice.

    Interestingly, only 40 percent of respondents were interested in their grandparents’ medical history. Just 37 percent cared about the work their grandparents did, and slightly less (36 percent) wanted to hear about the best places they’d traveled to in their lives.

    The survey was conducted by OnePoll in December 2018.
    https://www.studyfinds.org/family-tr...-grandparents/

    I think it's sad that a third of Americans can't name all four grandparents.

    I hope more Americans take up genealogy and do the research into their family tree. And I hope more people do DNA testing.

    Have you tried a DNA testing website/company to help you learn more?

    Do you know the names of all four of your grandparents? (You don't have to list them, just answer yes or no.)

    I'll make this a poll.

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    I grew up knowing all four of my adoptive grandparents, as well as hearing some stories of their own parents(adoptive great grandparents). Additionally, I've been using AncestryDNA's records to help research my adoptive family's history, figure they would find it interesting, even though it doesn't necessarily apply to me.

    I don't know my own biological parents, nor grandparents. However, with DNA testing and lots of trial/error triangulation with my DNA matches, I've been able to approximate some of my very likely 2nd great grandparents and back to the 1600's. Seems I have the opposite issue from most other people, I know some of my historical ancestors(late 1800's and back), but not my recent family.
    "Living or dying, it's not a big deal. What we should be concerned about is whether or not we're allowed to crawl to our graves."

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    Quote Originally Posted by ~Elizabeth~ View Post
    https://www.studyfinds.org/family-tr...-grandparents/

    I think it's sad that a third of Americans can't name all four grandparents.

    I hope more Americans take up genealogy and do the research into their family tree. And I hope more people do DNA testing.

    Have you tried a DNA testing website/company to help you learn more?

    Do you know the names of all four of your grandparents? (You don't have to list them, just answer yes or no.)

    I'll make this a poll.
    It seems to me this is more of a function of the Anglo world's neglect for the extended family than plain ignorance. At the very least in the Latin world and elsewhere you don't see families consigning their elderly to foster homes once they can't depend on themselves as frequently. I know, it's a gross generalization, but it has always rubbed me the wrong way how people in the US and related sites don't care as much for extended family as much as they should.

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    Quote Originally Posted by El Andullero View Post
    It seems to me this is more of a function of the Anglo world's neglect for the extended family than plain ignorance. At the very least in the Latin world and elsewhere you don't see families consigning their elderly to foster homes once they can't depend on themselves as frequently. I know, it's a gross generalization, but it has always rubbed me the wrong way how people in the US and related sites don't care as much for extended family as much as they should.
    The Anglo’s disrespect for elders and their community astounds me. This is a product of a “culture” where people only care about themselves and end up destroying themselves as a result. It’s not “cultural Marxism” or whatever conspiracy they pull out of their asses to deflect the blame from themselves.
    The reason a dog has so many friends is that he wags his tail instead of his tongue.

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    Actually I don't, because one of my grandmothers remarried, and I only know her second husband (I don't know if that is called a step grandfather?). I've never met my biological grandfather and I didn't even know that the step one wasn't my real grandfather until I was adult.
    Beyond that I couldn't care less and I have no plans to take any test of any kind.

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    I grew up knowing all four of my grandparents and one great grandmother, I was especially close to my dad's parents. My maternal grandma's ancestry is somewhat of a mystery to me and I am not 100% sure exactly what her maiden surname was but my family is only 2-3 generations removed from their old countries though.

    I have taken a 23andme test, mostly expected results.
    Last edited by arkas; 2019-01-13 at 02:17.

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    I don't even understand how someone cannot know their grandparents
    The reason a dog has so many friends is that he wags his tail instead of his tongue.

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    They should say White Americans because every other ethnic group in America are very close to their family, most white americans send their parents to live in senior homes, the grandkids grow up not knowing much about them, that explains why White Americans in this study can't even name their 4 grandparents

    You would have to be a damn moron not to know who they were
    but White Americans in general have no soul, so its obvious they do not care about the elders in their family

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    Quote Originally Posted by DragonRouge View Post
    I don't even understand how someone cannot know their grandparents

    In my case I grew up with only my Mom. I had no father or grandparents growing up. I knew their names from my Mom. My father was an irresponsible jerk who abandoned us (me and my Mom). Both of my grandfathers died years before I was born. I met both of my grandmothers. My father grew up estranged from his father's family because they were Roman Catholic and didn't approve of his converting to Protestantism and marrying my grandmother. And my grandmother's family didn't like my grandfather's family. My paternal grandfather died as a passenger in a car accident (there is some family dispute over that...my father says his father was pushed out of the car, filled with relatives). Then on my Mother's side, her parents families didn't approve of each other either. My maternal grandmother being from the South, and my maternal grandfather from the North. Both had grandparents who fought in the Civil War. So my Mom and her brothers grew up barely knowing either side of the family. My Mom and her Mom were estranged from each other. My grandmothers didn't care about knowing me growing up. My maternal grandmother told my Mom to give me up for adoption but she kept me.

    I've done a lot of genealogical research and I've done DNA testing.
    Last edited by ~Elizabeth~; 2019-01-13 at 04:59.

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    Quote Originally Posted by El Andullero View Post
    It seems to me this is more of a function of the Anglo world's neglect for the extended family than plain ignorance. At the very least in the Latin world and elsewhere you don't see families consigning their elderly to foster homes once they can't depend on themselves as frequently. I know, it's a gross generalization, but it has always rubbed me the wrong way how people in the US and related sites don't care as much for extended family as much as they should.

    In my case it was the opposite. The adults didn't care about the kids. When my maternal grandmother was widowed with 3 children her husband's family (six siblings) did not offer any help. Neither of my parents families were interested in being in my life growing up.
    Last edited by ~Elizabeth~; 2019-01-13 at 05:09.

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