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Thread: Novel mtDNA N Found in Ancient Saharan Sample15 days old

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    I could have sworn someone said the remains at Gobero were so called "Medit Caucasoids." Unless they retratcted and changed things, thats what I heard.


    Quote Originally Posted by beyoku View Post
    ^ I find it interesting that Gobero Remains are morphometrically Negroid now. Anyone have full access to PUBMED so We can get the raw data?
    Paxhumana died a long time ago Anodyne, GET OVER IT!

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    Quote Originally Posted by beyoku View Post
    ^ I find it interesting that Gobero Remains are morphometrically Negroid now. Anyone have full access to PUBMED so We can get the raw data?
    There were two notable "populations" occupying Gobero one during the early-Holocene and the other during mid-Holocene. The former where considered closest to Saharans and North Africans moreso defined as relatively "robust" and the Latter very much more "Negroid" with considerable prognathsm etc. Regardless the settlers of Gobero were morphologically saharan inspite of their Negro or lack of Negro Affinities. The Early Holocene samples are best described as 'mechtoid' shifted toward the Mid-Holocene Gobero people. I'm guessing these Lybians cluster in between these guys, possibly closer to the mid holocene settlers.
    Forum biodiversity is awesome!


    Quote Originally Posted by Polako View Post
    Depends which prehistoric North Africa you mean. There's a preprint here saying that Neolithic North Africans (you know, the ones who replaced the hunter-gatherers there), were fully West Eurasian. Makes sense.

    https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2017/09/21/191569

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    (a) Haplogroup N differentiates from L3 in the African continent, with a subsequent spread out of Africa. (b) Haplogroups M and N diverged from L3 outside Africa or during the expansion of AMH out of the continent; later migrations during Early Upper Paleolithic and the Neolithic diffusion led some lineages back to North Africa.

    Our results show an unprecedented evidence of an ancestral N lineage in the central Sahara, exactly at the middle of the north-south and east-west clines of the northern part of the continent, greatly enriching the fragmented picture of ancient DNA studies in Africa. The survival of an ancestral haplogroup in areas where it is now no longer present reinforces the need to increase research on ancient samples in Africa, in particular in the still poorly investigate regions of the Sahara.
    A previous Saudi Arabian study also found that Y chromosome DE-YAP* originated in the Arabian Peninsula, which served as an incubator for the early diversification of non-African haplogroups (Abu-Amero et al. 2009). It's plausible that DE-YAP* evolved in the Arabian Peninsula around 65,000 years ago and Haplogroup D subsequently headed for Asia and Oceania from the Arabian Peninsula along with the three main Eurasian mtDNA haplogroups M, R, and N.

    Thus, the spread of pastoralism from the Levant to Northeast Africa could probably represent the context for the introgression of the N haplogroup into the central Sahara, even if it is commonly associated with derivative lineages (N1)1,37.
    The spread of pastoralism from the Levant to Northeast Africa could also be associated with Haplogroup E. DE-YAP* returned to northeast Africa from the Arabian Peninsula and evolved into Haplogroup E.

    Regions near but external to northeast Africa, like the Levant or the southern Arabian Peninsula could have served as an incubator for the early diversification of non-African uniparental haplogroup varieties like Y chromosome DE-YAP*, CF-P143* and mtDNA M and N molecular ancestors. These would have spread globally and diversified over time and space. This model would imply that both CF-P143 and the DE-YAP evolved nearby but outside Africa. One DE-YAP* ancestor would have spread to Asia and evolved to haplogroup D while another DE-YAP* returned to northeast Africa and evolved into hg E. It is noteworthy that DE-YAP* has been detected at low frequency in Africa [37]. Again, this hypothesis has its mtDNA counterpart as it is well documented that, in the Palaeolithic, at least three clades (X1, U6, M1) derived respectively from the three main Eurasian macrohaplogroups (N, R, M) came back to North Africa from Asia [38–42].
    https://bmcgenet.biomedcentral.com/a...471-2156-10-59
    Last edited by ThirdTerm; 2019-03-18 at 21:35.

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