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Thread: R-L21!! Celts of Spain mostly in the NW?68 days old

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    Quote Originally Posted by Opie View Post
    Yeah, I see what you’re saying, this was done with some of my ancestors as well in Mexico in the 1800’s but I have yet to see it in the 1700’s when mexico was still in the colonial era. I certainly am not implying it did not happen during the colonial era, I’m just saying it didnt happen on any of my lines. We tracked our surname to sonora, (it changed spelling by one letter in the mid 1800’s), and into the mid 1700’s now in jalisco.
    Was your Hernandez name ever shortened or from a prominent family?

    For example, I see that in some people I've spoken to, their surname would be Garcia or Perez, but when you keep tracing it back further, it was originally Garcia de Alba or Perez de Alencastro, two founding families that settled in Western Jalisco in the 1500's(Francisco Garcia de Alba was given a land grant in 1563, he is the patriarch of all Jalisco Garcia de Alba descendants today).

    Edit: If from a prominent family, or they shortened a unique surname, then it makes the research much easier.
    Last edited by a_garcia49; 2019-05-12 at 06:01.
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  3. #12
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    Speaking to what Celph was describing, that happened with my adoptive mother's family lol.

    I decided to research my adoptive maternal grandfather's tree, because no one knew anything about his family before his parents. Turns out the reason we couldn't find any records, is because my grandfather's surname(Magallon) was not passed paternally. Research shows his grandfather(born 1874) was the first to be named Magallon, whom he got from his maternal grandmother(my grandfather's 2nd great grandmother born 1831). Before that generation, the paternal surname was Topete.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opie View Post
    Yeah, I see what you’re saying, this was done with some of my ancestors as well in Mexico in the 1800’s but I have yet to see it in the 1700’s when mexico was still in the colonial era. I certainly am not implying it did not happen during the colonial era, I’m just saying it didnt happen on any of my lines. We tracked our surname to sonora, (it changed spelling by one letter in the mid 1800’s), and into the mid 1700’s now in jalisco.
    Okay but surnames mean nothing
    because of spelling changes, changing last names, shortening last names etc
    unless you have tracked your Spanish ancestor, then that is the only way you can verify your last name

    also the Spanish last name origins mean nothing because many of them can be found all over Spain, like I once mentioned, that 90% of the so called Basque last names found in Mexico came via Southern Spaniards, because many of them also had so called Basque last names, and also looking at the Mexican results from AncestryDNA with so called Basque last names, they have not come out with Basque, not even 1%

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    Quote Originally Posted by a_garcia49 View Post
    Was your Hernandez name ever shortened or from a prominent family?

    For example, I see that in some people I've spoken to, their surname would be Garcia or Perez, but when you keep tracing it back further, it was originally Garcia de Alba or Perez de Alencastro, two founding families that settled in Western Jalisco in the 1500's(Francisco Garcia de Alba was given a land grant in 1563, he is the patriarch of all Jalisco Garcia de Alba descendants today).

    Edit: If from a prominent family, or they shortened a unique surname, then it makes the research much easier.
    No in fact it he was listed as minero. Apparently, I come from a looong line of miners. And thats the surname line. Back to the mid 1700’s the name change slightly by one letter. He was also a mestizo at that time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Celph Titled View Post
    Okay but surnames mean nothing
    because of spelling changes, changing last names, shortening last names etc
    unless you have tracked your Spanish ancestor, then that is the only way you can verify your last name

    also the Spanish last name origins mean nothing because many of them can be found all over Spain, like I once mentioned, that 90% of the so called Basque last names found in Mexico came via Southern Spaniards, because many of them also had so called Basque last names, and also looking at the Mexican results from AncestryDNA with so called Basque last names, they have not come out with Basque, not even 1%
    The basque surnames lines that have been traced are definately basque. One was my grandmother Luz, her grandfather is the one that was killed by apache. My dads cousin Luis did most of it. They came to mexico in the early 1700’s. They were basque.

    Another was a presidio comandante, a criollo of basque descent very much a pominent family who’s father too was a presidio comandante. It shows in two of my DNA results done

    I am showing portugee on my dna results too which are known to have a lot of celtic there

    What I find interesting was with all these soldiers in what is today arizona, and soldiers in california as well as pobladores, I was expecting to find some pima or chumash or maybe yaque or tongva but all the NA comes from southern mexico.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Opie View Post
    No in fact it he was listed as minero. Apparently, I come from a looong line of miners. And thats the surname line. Back to the mid 1700’s the name change slightly by one letter. He was also a mestizo at that time.
    Ah, then that's going to be harder, since Hernandes is a generic name. I've seen some Hernandes in Jalisco trace back to mestizos, Indians and mulatos who adopted their surname in the late 1600s, before that, they didn't have a surname.

    You can't really predict much from a surname given Mexico's history of mixing and indigenous/African assimilation, unless you can track the specific Spanish family that immigrated.

    Do you by chance know where in Jalisco that distant Hernandes ancestor was from?

    Lots of mestizos, Indians and mulatos lived in some mining regions, he could've adopted the name.
    "Living or dying, it's not a big deal. What we should be concerned about is whether or not we're allowed to crawl to our graves."

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    Edit: Many surnames used "s" as opposed to "z" in the 1700's, so that's not too surprising.
    "Living or dying, it's not a big deal. What we should be concerned about is whether or not we're allowed to crawl to our graves."

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    Quote Originally Posted by a_garcia49 View Post
    Ah, then that's going to be harder, since Hernandes is a generic name. I've seen some Hernandes in Jalisco trace back to mestizos, Indians and mulatos who adopted their surname in the late 1600s, before that, they didn't have a surname.

    You can't really predict much from a surname given Mexico's history of mixing and indigenous/African assimilation, unless you can track the specific Spanish family that immigrated.

    Do you by chance know where in Jalisco that distant Hernandes ancestor was from?

    Lots of mestizos, Indians and mulatos lived in some mining regions, he could've adopted the name.
    No our surname is not Hernandes or Hernandez , sorry, that was an example, they changed our surname in the 1800’s by adding an s at the end. But yes, it would not surprise me to find a native in there or to find the surname came from a different region of Spain. The website also matched a mestizo in guatemala so that may be a possibility as well. It appears that Vera Cruz was THEE port back in the day and much of the north and south american efforts were pulled through this port. Although Mexico was the mother ship sort of speak, in that Spain did not do as much as I had previously thought. I often say that in the USA at least, on the east coast, England was the mother country but in the southwest, Mexico is the mother country.
    There also seems to be a Granillo tossed in there with my surname as well as Martinez so there is a possibility as well that somewhere along the line the the surnames were switched as the other poster (Celph)suggested.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Opie View Post
    No our surname is not Hernandes or Hernandez , sorry, that was an example, they changed our surname in the 1800’s by adding an s at the end. But yes, it would not surprise me to find a native in there or to find the surname came from a different region of Spain. The website also matched a mestizo in guatemala so that may be a possibility as well. It appears that Vera Cruz was THEE port back in the day and much of the north and south american efforts were pulled through this port. Although Mexico was the mother ship sort of speak, in that Spain did not do as much as I had previously thought. I often say that in the USA at least, on the east coast, England was the mother country but in the southwest, Mexico is the mother country.
    There also seems to be a Granillo tossed in there with my surname as well as Martinez so there is a possibility as well that somewhere along the line the the surnames were switched as the other poster (Celph)suggested.
    Gotcha, well the principle still stands, it's best to locate the unique Spanish family tracing to their arrival from Spain before speculating on surname origin.

    As for your haplogroup, ancient migrations could explain it. I have some DNA matches who are I-L205, which has roots in Northern Europe, but their recent paternal roots are obviously from Iberians who migrated to Mexico.
    "Living or dying, it's not a big deal. What we should be concerned about is whether or not we're allowed to crawl to our graves."

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