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Thread: Akkadian Language3261 days old

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    Thanks to Othuroyo and Birko for posting those links...it's the first time I've heard Akkadian being spoken and I agree that it sounds more like sureth than Arabic, though the pronunciation was no doubt off. They should have gotten an Assyrian or Syriac priest to read it for them; would've sounded more authentic.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Othuroyo View Post
    Some Assyriologists have recorded themselves reading Assyrian/Babylonian litterature and poetry in the Akkadian Language. It's the Babylonian dialect they read, because of all the sh-sounds while the Assyrian dialect pronounce it by just the letter S.
    Indeed, that's a character that West-Semitic languages lost along with other emphatic sounds.
    It was once represented by taw (ת) before the mainstream 't' sound was assigned to it.


    Quote Originally Posted by Othuroyo View Post
    The German dialects most of these Assyriologists have totally ruined it alot for me so chose the person Antoine Cavigneaux who have a more "semitic" accent when talking.

    He has a very french accent in the recording.


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    Those Bronze Age samples are just red herrings to distract you from the actual arrivals of populations with Semitic ancestry. Don’t take the bait by focusing on the wrong samples, lol. He is passing off Bronze Age Levantines with no evidence of strong predynastic input, as “Semites“. This way, he can flip it around and say Proto-Semitic speakers and predynastics were more or less identical to the Bronze Age Levantines sampled so far.
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    @Semitic Duwa

    Wonder what the resident Proto-Semite has to say about this. I thought unmixed Egyptians were supposed to be Abusir with less/zero Chl?

    In your view, does this prove you wrong, or is it just a coincidence () that M1 is absent in one of the three subsamples from Abusir, and rare overall?

    And don’t change your signature now, please. I’m looking forward to you looking more and more incompetent as more aDNA is published. Wish there was a way to speed this up. But the extra wait and seeing you with your pants down every day, kinda has its own appeal, too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Azvarohi View Post
    And by "Western Assyrian" and "Eastern Assyrian" you mean various Aramaic tongues?
    It's not really Aramaic tongues. More like a hybrid of Aramaic and Akkadian. If I'm not mistaken, modern Assyrian "Neo-Aramaic" has an Aramaic substratum or something but with an extensive Akkadian vocabulary. Perhaps not 50/50, but it's surely a great deal of Akkadian in the modern Assyrian dialects. The closest we have today to the original Aramaic language is a few villages in Syria. Assyrians don't understand these Western Aramaic dialects very well.

    Ancient Assyrian was however, an Akkadian language influenced by Sumerian.

    These recordings of Assyriologists speaking (or trying to speak) Assyrian is interesting, and Assyrians ought to cooperate with these Assyriologists in order to fine-tune the pronunciation and subsequently revive the Akkadian language as a national Assyrian language.
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    Quote Originally Posted by EliasAlucard View Post
    It's not really Aramaic tongues. More like a hybrid of Aramaic and Akkadian. If I'm not mistaken, modern Assyrian "Neo-Aramaic" has an Aramaic substratum or something but with an extensive Akkadian vocabulary. Perhaps not 50/50, but it's surely a great deal of Akkadian in the modern Assyrian dialects. The closest we have today to the original Aramaic language is a few villages in Syria. Assyrians don't understand these Western Aramaic dialects very well.

    Ancient Assyrian was however, an Akkadian language influenced by Sumerian.

    These recordings of Assyriologists speaking (or trying to speak) Assyrian is interesting, and Assyrians ought to cooperate with these Assyriologists in order to fine-tune the pronunciation and subsequently revive the Akkadian language as a national Assyrian language.
    Revive it for the sake of learning and study sure, but revive it to replace our current language? I don't agree, why would we abandon our current language that was passed down to us by our forefathers? Our language is a continuation from ancient Assyrian period, in other words it's more authentic than a made-up language.

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    Thank you Humanist for sharing the list of the Akkadian vocabulary. However, it seems that many of the words are indo-european, for instance, baba (papa), enu, eina, aino, (eye, the same word used in farsi and kurdish). And the words in the example are strikingly close to the English equivalent.

    How do you think that these words have been transmitted to the Akkadian language? Or is it loan-words from the Akkadian language, that have been absorbed by indo-European/Iranian speakers from the area?

    I also want to highlight that words describing body parts and nature - are the last words, in a language to be replaced by a foreign one. Therefore, it could be interesting to compare these types of words with other indo-iranian languages, to see whether they have any similarity with each other.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheikh-Ubayd View Post
    Thank you Humanist for sharing the list of the Akkadian vocabulary. However, it seems that many of the words are indo-european, for instance, baba (papa), enu, eina, aino, (eye, the same word used in farsi and kurdish). And the words in the example are strikingly close to the English equivalent.

    How do you think that these words have been transmitted to the Akkadian language? Or is it loan-words from the Akkadian language, that have been absorbed by indo-European/Iranian speakers from the area?

    I also want to highlight that words describing body parts and nature - are the last words, in a language to be replaced by a foreign one. Therefore, it could be interesting to compare these types of words with other indo-iranian languages, to see whether they have any similarity with each other.
    Both Baba and Aino are Semitic in origin:

    Father
    Aramaic - Aba
    Hebrew - Aba
    Arabic - Ab

    Persian - Pedar
    Avestan - Pitar
    Parthian - Pid

    Eye
    Aramaic - Ayina
    Hebrew - Ayin
    Arabic - Ayin

    Persian - Chashm
    Avestan - Chashman
    Parthian - Chashm

    Clearly Kurdish and Farsi borrowed it from Arabic, this comes from the Islamic influence.

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    Quote Originally Posted by birko19 View Post
    Both Baba and Aino are Semitic in origin:

    Father
    Aramaic - Aba
    Hebrew - Aba
    Arabic - Ab

    Persian - Pedar
    Avestan - Pitar
    Parthian - Pid

    Eye
    Aramaic - Ayina
    Hebrew - Ayin
    Arabic - Ayin

    Persian - Chashm
    Avestan - Chashman
    Parthian - Chashm

    Clearly Kurdish and Farsi borrowed it from Arabic, this comes from the Islamic influence.
    Are you sure that these word are arabic or semitic in origin? Because, "abro" in farsi/kurdi, means eyebrow - the same word used in English. Then, regarding your theory, the english equivalent would also be borrowed word from semitic languages, due to the "influence of islam", but Islam has never had a major influence on the anglo-saxon world. There is of course, words that english have borrowed from semitic languages, for instance, "candy". Candy derives from the arabic word "cand" which means something sweat (the same word means suger in farsi/kurdish). But not that severely as it would, if many of the words presumable indo-european in origin, was in fact semitic. But, you are probably right. And in the end, who cares? At least not me, since I dont base my nationalism on linguistic and vocabulary.

    By the way, another word that kurdish and farsi, with out a doubt, have borrowed from the semitic tongue is, "klido", which means key.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheikh-Ubayd View Post
    By the way, another word that kurdish and farsi, with out a doubt, have borrowed from the semitic tongue is, "klido", which means key.
    Very interesting. I knew of some pure Assyrian words in the Kurdish language but "klido" was a new one to me (and vice versa of course). We use that word exactly the same

    ---------- Post added 2011-03-19 at 21:04 ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by Sheikh-Ubayd View Post
    Are you sure that these word are arabic or semitic in origin?
    And yes, those words are Semitic in origin. They are Proto-Semitic words who are prevalent in all Semitic languages, where as e.g. the root for eye is "a-y-n".
    “Ashur lived at the city of Nineve; and named his subjects Assyrians, who became the most fortunate nation, beyond others” (Antiquities, i, vi, 4): Flavius Josephus

    “It is impossible for me and my people to surrender after seeing the atrocities done to my Assyrian people by your government; therefore my brother is one, my people are many, I would rather lose my brother but not my nation”
    - Mar Shimun XXI Benyamin, Catholicos Patriarch of the
    Assyrian Church of the East 1887 - 1918

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    I confirm "Aino/Ayn" is very Semitic. A good Sephardi Jew sentence would be "esa ainai el heharim" (i'll fit my eyes to the mountains) ...x)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ekarfi View Post
    I confirm "Aino/Ayn" is very Semitic. A good Sephardi Jew sentence would be "esa ainai el heharim" (i'll fit my eyes to the mountains) ...x)
    Are you fluent in Hebrew?
    “Ashur lived at the city of Nineve; and named his subjects Assyrians, who became the most fortunate nation, beyond others” (Antiquities, i, vi, 4): Flavius Josephus

    “It is impossible for me and my people to surrender after seeing the atrocities done to my Assyrian people by your government; therefore my brother is one, my people are many, I would rather lose my brother but not my nation”
    - Mar Shimun XXI Benyamin, Catholicos Patriarch of the
    Assyrian Church of the East 1887 - 1918

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